1900 in baseball

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The following are the baseball events of the year 1900 throughout the world.  

Champions

Statistical leaders

  National League
AVG Honus Wagner PIT .341
HR Herman Long BOS 12
RBI Elmer Flick PHI 110
Wins Joe McGinnity BRO 28
ERA Rube Waddell PIT 2.37
Ks Noodles Hahn CIN 132

National League final standings

National League W L Pct. GB Home Road
Brooklyn Superbas 82 54 0.603 43–26 39–28
Pittsburgh Pirates 79 60 0.568 42–28 37–32
Philadelphia Phillies 75 63 0.543 8 45–23 30–40
Boston Beaneaters 66 72 0.478 17 42–29 24–43
St. Louis Cardinals 65 75 0.464 19 40–31 25–44
Chicago Orphans 65 75 0.464 19 45–30 20–45
Cincinnati Reds 62 77 0.446 21½ 27–34 35–43
New York Giants 60 78 0.435 23 38–31 22–47


Events

  • April 19 – In Boston, the Phillies win 19–17 in the NL's highest scoring opening day game. Boston tied the game with 9 runs in the ninth. Philadelphia, once up 16–4, scores 2 in the 10th for the win.
  • May 5 – The Orphans' Jimmy Ryan hits his 20th career leadoff homer against the visiting Cincinnati Reds and Noodles Hahn. Chicago wins 4–3.
  • July 4 – At the West Side Grounds, about 1,000 of the 10,000 fans at the game fire pistols to celebrate July 4. No injuries were reported. meanwhile, Chicago beats Philadelphia, 5–4, in 12 innings.
  • July 13 – The Phillies' third baseman, Harry Wolverton, has 3 triples among his 5 hits in a 23–8 win over the Pirates.


Births

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Deaths

  • January 9 – Henry Kessler, 53, shortstop who hit .253 for the Brooklyn Atlantics and Cincinnati Reds from 1873 to 1877.
  • January 19 – Marty Bergen, 28, catcher for the Boston Beaneaters since 1896 who batted .280 for the 1898 championship team
  • January 21 – Jim Rogers, 27, played two seasons and managed one from 1896 to 1897.
  • February 7 – "Brewery Jack" Taylor, 26, pitcher for the Cincinnati Reds (among others), who had three 20-win seasons from 1894–'96, and led the National League in games and innings in the 1898 season.
  • February 23 – Nate Berkenstock, 69[?], played right field for one game with the 1871 Philadelphia Athletics.
  • March 31 – Foghorn Bradley, 44, pitcher for the 1876 Boston Red Caps who went on to umpire for six major league seasons.
  • April 28 – Walter Plock, 30, center fielder for the 1891 Philadelphia Phillies.
  • May 14 – Billy Taylor, 45[?], player for seven seasons, mostly as a pitcher and outfielder, from 1881 to 1887.
  • May 15 – John Traffley, 38[?], right fielder who appeared in two games with the 1889 Louisville Colonels.
  • May 31 – Tom Patterson, 55[?], outfielder for four seasons in the National Association.
  • June 1 – Charlie Gray, 36[?], pitcher who went 1–4 for the 1890 Pittsburgh Alleghenys.
  • June 12 – Mox McQuery, 38, first baseman who hit .271 with 13 home runs and 160 RBI in 417 games, and the National League in putouts in 1886.
  • June 13 – Frank Fleet, 52[?], utility player for five seasons in the National Association.
  • July 15 – Billy Barnie, 47, manager of the Orioles from 1883 to 1891, and later of three other teams; pilot of Hartford team in Eastern League since 1899.
  • July 22 – Harry Jacoby, [?], infielder/outfielder for two seasons with the Baltimore Orioles of the American Association.
  • July 24 – Fred Zahner, 30, backup catcher who hit .214 with the Louisville Colonels from 1894–'95.
  • August 24 – John Puhl, 24, third baseman who played briefly for the New York Giants in 1898 and 1899.
  • September 14 – Ed Knouff, 33, pitcher/outfielder who posted a 20–20 record and hit a .187 average in the American Association from 1885 to 1889.
  • October 7 – Bill Phillips, 43, first baseman for Cleveland and Brooklyn who was the first Canadian in the major leagues; batted. 302 in 1885.
  • October 9 – Harry Wheeler, 42, pitcher and outfielder for eight different teams between 1878 and 1884.
  • December 14 – Jim Devlin, 34, pitcher who posted a 11–10 record with a 3.38 ERA for the New York Giants, Philadelphia Quakers and St. Louis Browns from 1886 to 1889.









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