1912 in baseball

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The following are the baseball events of the year 1912 throughout the world.  

Champions

Awards and honors

MLB statistical leaders

American League National League
AVG Ty Cobb DET .402 Heinie Zimmerman CHC .372
HR Frank Baker PHA &
Tris Speaker BOS
10 Heinie Zimmerman CHC 12
RBI Frank Baker PHA 130 Honus Wagner PIT 102
Wins Joe Wood BOS 34 Larry Cheney CHC &
Rube Marquard NYG
26
ERA Walter Johnson WSH 1.39 Jeff Tesreau NYG 1.96
Ks Walter Johnson WSH 303 Grover Cleveland Alexander PHI 195

Major league baseball final standings

American League final standings

American League W L Pct. GB Home Road
Boston Red Sox 105 47 0.691 57–20 48–27
Washington Senators 91 61 0.599 14 45–32 46–29
Philadelphia Athletics 90 62 0.592 15 45–31 45–31
Chicago White Sox 78 76 0.506 28 34–43 44–33
Cleveland Naps 75 78 0.490 30½ 41–35 34–43
Detroit Tigers 69 84 0.451 36½ 37–39 32–45
St. Louis Browns 53 101 0.344 53 27–50 26–51
New York Highlanders 50 102 0.329 55 31–44 19–58


National League final standings

National League W L Pct. GB Home Road
New York Giants 103 48 0.682 49–25 54–23
Pittsburgh Pirates 93 58 0.616 10 44–31 49–27
Chicago Cubs 91 59 0.607 11½ 46–30 45–29
Cincinnati Reds 75 78 0.490 29 45–32 30–46
Philadelphia Phillies 73 79 0.480 30½ 34–41 39–38
St. Louis Cardinals 63 90 0.412 41 37–40 26–50
Brooklyn Trolley Dodgers 58 95 0.379 46 33–43 25–52
Boston Braves 52 101 0.340 52 31–47 21–54


Events

U.S. president Taft at a Washington-Chicago game, August 13
  • May 17 - Fenway Park is officially dedicated, almost one month after hosting its first game, as the Boston Red Sox host the Chicago White Sox playing in front of an overflow crowd. Nevertheless, the home town fans had their day spoiled as the White Sox trimmed the Red Sox, 5–2.
  • October 16 – The Boston Red Sox defeat the New York Giants, 3–2, in Game 8 of the World Series, ending one of the most exciting Series in Major League history. The Red Sox win the World Championship four games to three (with Game 2 being declared a tie). Nearly all of the games were close. Four games in this series were decided by one run. A fifth ended in a tie. A sixth was decided by two runs. Game 7 was the only one with a margin greater than three runs. Two games, including the decisive Game 8, went to extra innings. In Games 1 and 3, the losing team had the tying and winning runs on base when the game ended. This was the first time in which a World Series was decided in the last inning of the final game, in "sudden death" or "sudden victory" fashion. It was also the first Series where a team within one inning of losing came back to win. The next time a team that close to elimination recovered to win was in Game 6 of the 1986 Series.

Births

January–February

March–April

May–June

July–August

September–October

November–December

Deaths

January–March

  • January 11 – Lefty Marr, 49, outfielder/third baseman who hit .289 in 363 games for the Cincinnati Red Stockings, Columbus Solons, and Cincinnati Kelly's Killers from 1886 to 1891.
  • January 18 – John Russ, 53, outfielder/pitcher for the 1882 Baltimore Orioles of the American Association.
  • January 31 – Ed Taylor, 34, pitcher for the 1903 St. Louis Cardinals.
  • February 1 – Jim Doyle, 30, third baseman who hit .278 in two seasons with the Cincinnati Reds (1910) and Chicago Cubs (1911).
  • February 11 – Jimmy Knowles, 55, Canadian infielder who .241 in 357 games with six different teams in two leagues between 1884 and 1892.
  • March 6 – Pembroke Finlayson, 23, who pitched from 1908 through 1909 for the Brooklyn Superbas of the National League.
  • March 9 – Doc Amole, 33, National League pitcher for the Baltimore Orioles (1897) and Washington Senators (1898).
  • March 22 – Ed Kenna, 34, pitcher for the 1902 Philadelphia Athletics of the American League.
  • March 25 – Harry Keener, 40, pitcher who posted a 3–11 record and a 5.88 ERA for the 1896 Philadelphia Phillies.

April–August

  • April 17 – Ace Stewart, 43, second baseman for the 1895 Chicago Colts of the National League.
  • April 18 – Hank Gehring, 31, pitcher who posted a 3–7 record and a 3.91 ERA for the Washington Senators from 1907 to 1908.
  • April 20 – Sam Barkley, 53, American Association second baseman who played from 1884 through 1889 for the Toledo Blue Stockings, St. Louis Browns, Pittsburgh Alleghenys and Kansas City Cowboys.
  • April 28 – Josh Bunce, 64, left fielder for the 1877 Brooklyn Hartfords of the National League.
  • May 7 – Gus Alberts, 51, third baseman/shortstop for the Blues/Brewers/Nationals/Alleghenys from 1884 to 1891.
  • June 11 – Leonidas Lee, 51, outfielder for the 1877 St. Louis Brown Stockings of the National League.
  • June 29 – Harry Lyons, 46, outfielder who hit .234 and stole 120 bases in four different leagues with the Giants, Broncos, Browns and Quakers between 1887 and 1893.
  • August 6 – Dick Van Zant, 47, third baseman for the 1888 Cleveland Blues of the American Association.
  • August 10 – Ed Sales, 51, for the 1890 Pittsburgh Alleghenys of the National League.
  • August 15 – Lou Polchow, 32, pitcher for the 1902 Cleveland Bronchos of the American League.

September–October

  • September 5 – Tug Arundel, 50, catcher who played with four teams in two leagues from 1882 to 1888.
  • September 7 – Bugs Raymond, 30, pitcher who posted a 45–57 record and a 2.49 ERA in 136 games for the Tigers, Cardinals and Giants between 1904 and 1911.
  • September 15 – Al Barker, 73, who pitched one game for 1871 Rockford Forest Citys of the National Association.
  • September 26 – Cherokee Fisher, 67, star pitcher before and after the official beginning of professional baseball, known for his blazing fastball, who led the National Association in 1872 with a .909 W-L% and a 1.80 ERA.
  • October 1 – Bill Boyd, 59, National Association IF/OF/P and manager between the 1872 and 1875 seasons.
  • October 4 – George Knight, 56, pitcher for the 1875 New Haven Elm Citys of the National Association.
  • October 6 – Bill Finley, 49, National League catcher/outfielder for the 1886 New York Giants.
  • October 8 – Heinie Heitmuller, 29, outfielder who played from 1909 to 1910 for the Philadelphia Athletics.
  • October 10 – Bill Tobin, 58, National League third baseman for the Troy Trojans and Worcester Ruby Legs during the 1880 season.
  • October 20 – John Skopec, 32, American League pitcher for the Chicago White Sox (1901) and Detroit Tigers (1903).
  • October 21 – Charlie Waitt, 59, outfielder/first baseman for the Orioles/Browns/White Stockings/Quakers from 1875 to 1883.
  • October 24 – Piggy Ward, 45, OF/IF who hit .286 with 172 runs and 90 RBI in 221 games with the Senators/Orioles/Reds/Quakers/Pirates from 1883 to 1894.

November–December

  • November 1 – Ed Green, 52, pitcher/infielder for the 1890 Philadelphia Athletics of the American Association.
  • November 4 – Frank Murphy, 36, National League OF/IF who hit a combined .219 average in 80 games for the Boston Beaneaters and New York Giants in 1901.
  • November 8 – Cupid Childs, 45, second baseman for the Spiders/Orphans/Stars/Perfectos/Quakers from 1888 to 1901, a .306 career hitter with 1214 hits, who topped the American Association in doubles (1890) and the National League in runs (1892), while ranking third all-time in walks (991) upon retirement.
  • November 11 – John Rainey, 48, OF/IF for the New York Giants of the National League (1887) and the Buffalo Bisons of the Players League (1890).
  • November 15 – Dennis O'Neill, 45, first baseman for the 1893 St. Louis Browns of the National League.
  • November 26 – John T. Brush, 67, owner of the New York Giants from 1890 until the time of his death, who also owned the Indianapolis Hoosiers in the late 1880s and the Cincinnati Reds from 1891 to 1902.
  • November 27 – Fred Corey, 57[?], 3B/P/OF who posted a 27–46 record and hit a .246 average for the Providence Grays, Worcester Ruby Legs and Philadelphia Athletics between 1878 and 1885.
  • December 12 – Jim Green, 58, third baseman for the 1884 Washington Nationals of the Union Association.
  • December 21 – Jim Conway, 54, American Association pitcher who posted a 22–29 record and a 3.64 ERA in 56 games with the Brooklyn Atlantics (1884), Philadelphia Athletics (1885) and Kansas City Cowboys (1889).
  • December 21 – Jim Gilman, 42, third baseman the 1893 Cleveland Spiders of the National League.
  • December 22 – Ed Kennedy, 51, third baseman for the Cincinnati Outlaw Reds of the Union Association in 1884.
  • December 31 – Charlie Sprague, 48, pitcher who went 10–7 with a 4.51 ERA in three seasons with the Chicago White Stockings (1887), Cleveland Spiders (1889) and Toledo Maumees (1890).










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