1967 Major League Baseball season

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The 1967 Major League Baseball season. The St. Louis Cardinals defeated the Boston Red Sox four games to three in the 64th World Series, which was the first World Series appearance for the Red Sox in 21 years. Following the season, the Kansas City Athletics relocated to Oakland.

Awards and honors

Dodgers vs. Reds at Dodger Stadium, June 1967

MLB statistical leaders

  American League National League
Type Name Stat Name Stat
AVG Carl Yastrzemski1 BOS .326 Roberto Clemente PIT .357
HR Harmon Killebrew MIN
Carl Yastrzemski1 BOS
44 Hank Aaron ATL 39
RBI Carl Yastrzemski1 BOS 121 Orlando Cepeda STL 111
Wins Jim Lonborg BOS
Earl Wilson DET
22 Mike McCormick SFG 22
ERA Joe Horlen CHW 2.06 Phil Niekro ATL 1.87
SO Jim Lonborg BOS 246 Jim Bunning PHI 253
SV Minnie Rojas CAL 27 Ted Abernathy CIN 28
SB Bert Campaneris KCA 55 Lou Brock STL 52

1 American League Triple Crown Batting Winner

Major league baseball final standings

American League final standings

American League
Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
Boston Red Sox 92 70 .568
Detroit Tigers 91 71 .562 1
Minnesota Twins 91 71 .562 1
Chicago White Sox 89 73 .549 3
California Angels 84 77 .522 7.5
Baltimore Orioles 76 85 .472 15.5
Washington Senators 76 85 .472 15.5
Cleveland Indians 75 87 .463 17
New York Yankees 72 90 .444 20
Kansas City Athletics 62 99 .385 29.5

National League final standings

National League
Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
St. Louis Cardinals 101 60 .627
San Francisco Giants 91 71 .562 10.5
Chicago Cubs 87 74 .540 14
Cincinnati Reds 87 75 .537 14.5
Philadelphia Phillies 82 80 .506 19.5
Pittsburgh Pirates 81 81 .500 20.5
Atlanta Braves 77 85 .475 24.5
Los Angeles Dodgers 73 89 .451 28.5
Houston Astros 69 93 .426 32.5
New York Mets 61 101 .377 40.5

Other

  • April 21 - The Los Angeles Dodgers run of 737 consecutive games without a game being rained out ends.1
  • October 18, 1967: City officials from Kansas City, Oakland and Seattle were invited by Joe Cronin to discuss the A’s relocation plans. United States Senator Stuart Symington attended the meeting and discussed the possibility of revoking baseball’s antitrust exemption if the A’s were allowed to leave Kansas City. The owners began deliberation and after the first ballot, only six owners were in favor of relocation. The owner of Baltimore voted against, while the ownership for Cleveland, New York and Washington had abstained.2 In the second ballot, the New York Yankees voted in favor of the Athletics relocation to Oakland. To appease all interested parties, the Athletics announced that MLB would expand to Kansas City and Seattle no later than the 1971 MLB season.3 MLB owners, bowing to Symington's threat, awarded Kansas City and Seattle expansion American League franchises for the 1969 season.

Ironically, Seattle would lose its expansion club, the Pilots, after its lone campaign in the Pacific Northwest when the team was declared bankrupt and awarded to Milwaukee automobile dealer Bud Selig, who immediately moved the franchise to Milwaukee and renamed it the Brewers. Selig later became Commissioner of Baseball in 1998.

References

  1. ^ Pellowski, Michael J (2007). The Little Giant Book of Baseball Facts. United States: Sterling Publishing Co. p. 352. ISBN 9781402742736. 
  2. ^ Charlie Finley: The Outrageous Story of Baseball's Super Showman, p.113, G. Michael Green and Roger D. Launius. Walker Publishing Company, New York, 2010, ISBN 978-0-8027-1745-0
  3. ^ Charlie Finley: The Outrageous Story of Baseball's Super Showman, p.114, G. Michael Green and Roger D. Launius. Walker Publishing Company, New York, 2010, ISBN 978-0-8027-1745-0

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