Arab Commission for Human Rights

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Arab Commission for Human Rights
Arabic: اللجنة العربية لحقوق الإنسان
French: Commission Arabe des Droits Humains
Type Non-profit
NGO
Founded January 17, 1998 (1998-01-17)2
Headquarters
  • formally registered in Paris, 2/3 members live in Arab world, 1/3 in Europe
Key people Violette Daguerre, Moncef Marzouki, Haytham Manna
Mission "an indivisible and a wholesome approach toward all human rights in the Arab world as a whole" including economic, social and cultural rights2
Method(s) human rights
Members 15 founders in 19982
Website www.achr.nu

The Arab Commission for Human Rights (Arabic: اللجنة العربية لحقوق الإنسان‎ / French: Commission Arabe des Droits Humains / ACHR) is an Arab world non-governmental human rights organisation that was founded in 1998.23

Founding

The Arab Commission for Human Rights is a human rights non-governmental organisation founded on 17 January 1998 by 15 human rights activists from around the Arab world, that bases its work in the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESC), and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR).23 The ACHR claims to avoid any political affiliation.2 The ACHR aims to cover all human rights as being divisible in order to avoid the "western" vision of organisations of the "North" which limit their human rights advocacy to "arbitrary detention, judicial supervision, enforced disappearances, and torture."2

Leadership

The ACHR has a 15-member Board of Directors led by President Violette Daguerre from Lebanon. The Board includes Tunisian human rights activist and interim President of Tunisia Moncef Marzouki.2 Haytham Manna from Syria helped create the ACHR, becoming its spokesperson. He resigned from his role as ACHR spokesperson, while remaining a "non-office-holding" member, when in 2011 he helped found and take a leading role in the National Coordination Committee for Democratic Change in Syria.4

2009 suspension from United Nations Economic and Social Council

In June 2008, Algerian human rights lawyer and activist Rachid Mesli spoke at a United Nations event in Geneva on behalf of the Arab Commission for Human Rights. Algeria complained that Mesli had been charged with terrorism in 1999, and on 26 January 2009, representatives from the United Kingdom, Egypt, Sudan, Qatar and Algeria, along with other states, voted 18 to 0 (plus 1 abstention) to suspend the ACHR from the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC).56

References

  1. ^ see note 5 of Rishmawi, Mervat (December 2010). The Arab Charter on Human Rights and the League of Arab States: An Update. Oxford Journals. Archived from the original on 2011-01-18. Retrieved 2011-01-18. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h "What is the Arab Commission for Human Rights". 2011. Archived from the original on 2011-01-17. Retrieved 2011-01-17. 
  3. ^ a b "Regional Human Rights Organizations - Middle East". Emory University. 2011. Archived from the original on 2011-01-18. Retrieved 2011-01-18. 
  4. ^ Haddad, Bassam (2012-06-30). "The Current Impasse in Syria: Interview with Haytham Manna". Jadaliyya. Archived from the original on 2012-11-25. Retrieved 2012-11-26. 
  5. ^ Hussein, Abdel-Rahman (2009-02-01). "Arab Human Rights Commission blames Arab countries for UN Council suspension". Daily Star (Egypt). Archived from the original on 2011-01-17. Retrieved 2011-01-17. 
  6. ^ Lee, Matthew Russell. "At UN, Arab Commission for Human Rights Out for Year in 18-0-1 Vote, Member List Demanded". Inner City press. Archived from the original on 2011-01-18. Retrieved 2011-01-18. 

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