Bowling average

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George Lohmann
Of bowlers who have bowled at least 600 balls in Test cricket, George Lohmann has the lowest career bowling average, 10.75.1

The bowling average is one of a number of statistics used to compare bowlers in the sport of cricket. It is the ratio of runs conceded per wickets taken, meaning that the lower the bowling average is, the better the bowler is performing. The bowling average is commonly used alongside the economy rate and the strike rate to judge the overall performance of a bowler.

While the bowling average is a useful tool for judging bowlers, it has limitations; bowling averages in Test cricket have tended to rise over time, meaning that comparing bowlers of the modern period with those from before the First World War is impossible using the bowling average alone. Similarly, the location and strength of the opposition are significant factors in a player's bowling average.

Where a bowler has taken only a small number of wickets, their average can be artificially low, and an increase in wickets taken can result in large changes in their bowling average. Due to this, qualification caveats are generally applied to determine career records for bowling averages. After applying these criteria, George Lohmann holds the record for the lowest average in Test cricket, having claimed 112 wickets at an average of 10.75.

Calculation

A cricketer's bowling average is calculated by dividing the numbers of runs they have conceded by the number of wickets they have taken.2 The number of runs conceded by a bowler is determined as the total number of runs that the opposing side have scored while the bowler was bowling, excluding any byes, leg byes,3 or penalty runs.4 The bowler receives credit for any wickets taken during their bowling that are either bowled, caught, hit wicket, leg before wicket or stumped.5

\mathrm{Bowling~average} = \frac{\mathrm{Runs~conceded}}{\mathrm{Wickets~taken}}

A number of flaws have been identified for the statistic, most notable among these the fact that a bowler who has taken no wickets can not have a bowling average, as dividing by zero does not give a result. The effect of this is that there is that the bowling average can not distinguish between a bowler who has taken no wickets and conceded one run, and a bowler who has taken no wickets and conceded one hundred runs. The bowling average also does not tend to give a true reflection of the bowler's ability when the number of wickets they have taken is small, especially in comparison to the number of runs they have conceded.6 In his paper proposing an alternative method of judging batsmen and bowlers, Paul van Staden gives an example of this:

Suppose a bowler has bowled a total of 80 balls, conceded 60 runs and has taken only 2 wickets so that.. [their average is] 30. If the bowler takes a wicket with the next ball bowled (no runs obviously conceded), then [their average is] 20.6

Due to this, when establishing records for bowling averages, qualification criteria are generally set. For Test cricket, the Wisden Cricketers' Almanack sets this as 75 wickets,7 while ESPNcricinfo requires 2,000 deliveries.8 Similar restrictions are set for one-day cricket.910

Variations

A number of factors other than purely the ability level of the bowler have an effect on a player's bowling average. Most significant among these are the different eras in which cricket has been played. The bowling average tables in Test and first-class cricket are headed by players who competed in the nineteenth century,11 a period when pitches were uncovered and some were so badly looked after that they had rocks on them. Other factors which provided an advantage to bowlers in that era was the lack of significant safety equipment; batting gloves and helmets were not worn, and batsmen had to be warier. Other variations are caused by frequent matches against stronger or weaker opposition, changes in the laws of cricket and the length of matches.12 The bowlers competing in the Howa Bowl, a competition played in South African during the apartheid-era, restricted to non-white players,13 during which time, according to Vincent Barnes: "Most of the wickets we played on were underprepared. For me, as a bowler, it was great."14

Records

A. N. Hornby is one of three players to have a bowling average of zero in Test cricket.

Due to the varying restrictions placed on the records by different statisticians, the record for the lowest career bowling average can be different from publication to publication. In Test cricket, George Lohmann is listed as having the superior average by each of the Wisden Cricketers' Almanack, ESPNcricinfo and CricketArchive. Though all three use different restrictions, Lohmann's average of 10.75 is considered the best.178 If no qualification criteria were applied at all, three players—Wilf Barber, A. N. Hornby and Bruce Murray—would tie for the best average, all having claimed one just one wicket in Test matches, without conceding any runs, thus averaging zero.15

In One Day Internationals, the varying criteria set by ESPNcricinfo and CricketArchive result in different players being listed as holding the record. ESPNcricinfo has the stricter restriction, requiring 1,000 deliveries: by this measure, Joel Garner is the record-holder, having claimed his wickets at an average of 18.84.9 By CricketArchive's more relaxed requirement of 400 deliveries, John Snow leads the way, with an average of 16.57.16 The record is again split for the two websites for Twenty20 International cricket; in this situation ESPNcricinfo has the lower boundary, requiring just 30 balls to have been bowled. George O'Brien's average of 8.20 holds the record using those criteria, but the stricter 200 deliveries required by CricketArchive results in Andre Botha being listed as the superior, averaging 8.76.1017 The variations continue in women's international cricket; ESPNcricinfo list Betty Wilson as having the best Test average with 11.80,18 while CricketArchive accept Mary Spear's average of 5.78.19 In women's One Day International cricket, Caroline Barrs tops the CricketArchive list with an average of 9.52,20 but by ESPNcricinfo's stricter guidelines, the record is instead held by Gill Smith's 12.53.21

Domestically, the records for first-class cricket are dominated by players from the nineteenth century, who make up sixteen of the top twenty by ESPNcricinfo's criteria of 5,000 deliveries. William Lillywhite, who was active from 1825 to 1853 has the lowest average, claiming his 1,576 wickets at an average of just 1.54. The leading players from the twentieth century are Stephen Draai and Vincent Barnes with averages of just under twelve,11 both of whom claimed the majority of their wickets in the South African Howa Bowl tournament during the apartheid era.2223

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Test Lowest Career Bowling Average". CricketArchive. Retrieved 6 January 2013. 
  2. ^ van Staden (2008), p. 2.
  3. ^ "Understanding byes and leg byes". BBC Sport. Retrieved 6 January 2013. 
  4. ^ "Law 42 (Fair and unfair play)". Marylebone Cricket Club. 2010. Retrieved 6 January 2013. 
  5. ^ "The Laws of Cricket (2000 Code 4th Edition – 2010)". Marylebone Cricket Club. 2010. pp. 42–49. Retrieved 6 January 2013. 
  6. ^ a b van Staden (2008), p. 3.
  7. ^ a b Berry, Scyld, ed. (2011). Wisden Cricketers' Almanack 2011 (148 ed.). Alton, Hampshire: John Wisden & Co. Ltd. p. 1358. ISBN 978-1-4081-3130-5. 
  8. ^ a b "Records / Test matches / Bowling records / Best career bowling average". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 January 2013. 
  9. ^ a b "Records / One-Day Internationals / Bowling records / Best career bowling average". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 January 2013. 
  10. ^ a b "Records / Twenty20 Internationals / Bowling records / Best career bowling average". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 January 2013. 
  11. ^ a b "Records / First-class matches / Bowling records / Best career bowling average". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 January 2013. 
  12. ^ Boycott, Geoffrey (19 July 2011). "Geoffrey Boycott: ICC's Dream XI is a joke - it has no credibility". The Daily Telegraph (London: Telegraph Media Group). Retrieved 6 January 2013. 
  13. ^ "Player Profile: Vincent Barnes". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 January 2013. 
  14. ^ Odendaal, Andre; Reddy, Krish; Samson, Andrew (2012). The Blue Book: History of Western Province Cricket: 1890–2011. Johannesburg: Fanele. p. 185. ISBN 978-1-920196-40-0. Retrieved 6 January 2013. 
  15. ^ "Records / Test matches / Bowling records / Best career bowling average (without qualification)". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 January 2013. 
  16. ^ "ODI Lowest Career Bowling Average". CricketArchive. Retrieved 6 January 2013. 
  17. ^ "International Twenty20 Lowest Career Bowling Average". CricketArchive. Retrieved 6 January 2013. 
  18. ^ "Records / Women's Test matches / Bowling records / Best career bowling average". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 January 2013. 
  19. ^ "Women's Test Lowest Career Bowling Average". CricketArchive. Retrieved 6 January 2013. 
  20. ^ "Women's ODI Lowest Career Bowling Average". CricketArchive. Retrieved 6 January 2013. 
  21. ^ "Records / Women's One-Day Internationals / Bowling records / Best career bowling average". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 January 2013. 
  22. ^ "First-Class Matches played by Stephen Draai (48)". CricketArchive. Retrieved 6 January 2013. 
  23. ^ "First-Class Matches played by Vince Barnes (68)". CricketArchive. Retrieved 6 January 2013. 

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