Elections in Costa Rica

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Coat of arms of Costa Rica.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Costa Rica

Elections in Costa Rica gives information on elections and election results in Costa Rica.

Costa Rica elects on national level a head of state – the president – and a legislature. The President of Costa Rica is, together with two vice-presidents, elected for a four-year term by the people. The Legislative Assembly (Asamblea Legislativa) has 57 members, elected for four-year terms by proportional representation in each of the country's seven provinces.

Schedule

Election

Position 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
Type Presidential (February)
National Congress (February)
Gubernatorial (February)
None Presidential (February)
National Congress (February)
Gubernatorial (February)
President and
vice president
President and vice president None President and vice president
National Congress All seats None All seats
Provinces, cities and municipalities All positions None All positions

Inauguration

Position 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
Type Presidential (May)
National Congress (May)
Gubernatorial (May)
None Presidential (May)
National Congress (May)
Gubernatorial (May)
President and
vice president
8 May None 8 May
National Congress 8 May None 8 May
Provinces, cities and municipalities 8 May None 8 May

Latest elections

e • d Summary of the 7 February 2010 Costa Rican presidential election results
Candidates – Parties Votes %
Laura ChinchillaNational Liberation Party 863,803 46.78
Ottón SolísCitizens' Action Party 464,454 25.15
Otto GuevaraLibertarian Movement Party 384,540 20.83
Luis FishmanSocial Christian Unity Party 71,330 3.86
Óscar LópezAccess without Exclusion 35,215 1.91
Mayra GonzálezCosta Rican Renovation Party 13,376 0.72
Eugenio TrejosBroad Front 6,822 0.37
Rolando ArayaPatriotic Alliance Party* 3,795 0.21
Walter MuñozNational Integration Party* 3,198 0.17
Total (turnout 69.14%) 1,846,533 100.00
* Candidacy withdrawn in favour of Ottón Solís on 15 January 2010.
Source: TSE

See also

External links








Creative Commons License