European Parliament election, 2009 (United Kingdom)

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United Kingdom European Parliament election, 2009
United Kingdom
2004 ←
4 June 2009
→ 2014

72 seats to the European Parliament
  First party Second party
  David Cameron Nigel Farage
Leader David Cameron Nigel Farage
Party Conservative UKIP
Alliance ECR EFD
Leader since 6 December 2005 12 September 2006
Last election 27 seats 12 seats
Seats won 26 (including 1 UCUNF) 13
Seat change Decrease1 Increase1
Popular vote 4,198,394 2,498,226
Percentage 27.7% 16.5%
Swing Increase1.0% Increase0.3%

  Third party Fourth party
  Gordon Brown Nick Clegg
Leader Gordon Brown Nick Clegg
Party Labour Liberal Democrat
Alliance S&D ALDE
Leader since 24 June 2007 18 December 2007
Last election 19 seats 12 seats
Seats won 13 11
Seat change Decrease6 Decrease1
Popular vote 2,381,760 2,080,613
Percentage 15.7% 13.7%
Swing Decrease6.9% Decrease1.2%

2009 Euro ElectionMap.png

Colours indicate winning party.

Leader of Largest Party before election

David Cameron
Conservative

Subsequent Leader of Largest Party

David Cameron
Conservative

The European Parliament election was the United Kingdom's component of the 2009 European Parliament election, the voting for which was held on Thursday 4 June 2009, coinciding with the 2009 local elections in England. Most of the results of the election were announced on Sunday 7 June, after similar elections were held in the other 26 member states of the European Union. Scotland declared its result on Monday 8 June, as counting in the Western Isles was delayed due to observance of the Sabbath.

In total, 72 Members of the European Parliament were elected from the United Kingdom using proportional representation. (This figure would have been 73 if the Lisbon Treaty had entered into force by June 2009.) England, Scotland and Wales used the D'Hondt method of PR, whilst Northern Ireland used Single Transferable Vote (STV). Owing to the expansion of the European Union, the number of members elected for the United Kingdom was fewer than in 2004. This is because the total number of MEPs increased temporarily with the accession of Bulgaria and Romania in 2007, but was subsequently reduced again in accordance with the Treaty of Nice. The number of members elected from each region was modified by the Boundary Commission and Electoral Commission, based on the size of the electorate in each region.

Notable outcomes were the significant drop in support for the Labour Party (in its 12th year as government of the United Kingdom), who came third, and the United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP) finishing second in a major election for the first time in its history, coming level with Labour in terms of seats but ahead of them in terms of votes. This was the first time in British electoral history that a party in government had been outpolled in a national election by a party with no representation in the House of Commons. Also noteworthy was the election of two British National Party (BNP) candidates. It was the first time the Scottish National Party won the largest share of the European election vote in Scotland,1 and it was the first time since 1918 Labour had failed to come first in a Welsh election.2 It was the Democratic Unionist Party's worst ever European election result: the party had previously topped the poll in every European election in Northern Ireland since the first one in 1979.3 It was also the first time an Irish Republican topped the poll with Bairbre de Brun coming first with 125,000 votes.

Results

Great Britain and Gibraltar – overall result

Source: BBC News As the total number of UK seats went down compared to the 2004 election, the number of seats won in the 2004 elections is recalculated as it were in 2009 elections. Both figures are included in the table below, with the relative seat changes figures taking into account the changes in seat numbers per region.

Turnout across Great Britain was 15,136,932, representing 34% of the electorate

Party Votes Vote %  %
Change
Seats Seats
Change
Relative Seats
Change
Seats %
Conservative 4,198,394 27.9% +1.0 25 −2 +1 37.7
UKIP 2,498,226 16.6% +0.3 13 +1 +1 18.8
Labour 2,381,760 15.8% −6.9 13 −6 −5 18.8
Liberal Democrat 2,080,613 13.8% −1.2 11 −1 +1 15.9
Green 1,223,303 8.1% +2.4 2 0 0 2.9
BNP 943,598 6.3% +1.3 2 +2 +2 2.9
SNP 321,007 2.1% +0.7 2 0 0 2.9
Plaid Cymru 126,702 0.8% −0.1 1 0 0 1.4
English Democrats 279,801 1.9% +1.1 0 0 0 0
Christian/Christian
People's Alliance
(Joint Ticket)
249,493 1.7% +1.6 0 0 0 0
Socialist Labour 173,115 1.1% +1.1 0 0 0 0
NO2EU 153,236 1.0% +1.0 0 0 0 0
Scottish Green 80,442 0.5% 0.0 0 0 0 0
Jury Team 78,569 0.5% +0.5 0 0 0 0
UK First 74,007 0.5% +0.5 0 0 0 0
Libertas 73,544 0.5% +0.5 0 0 0 0
Jan Jananayagam (Independent) 50,014 0.3% +0.3 0 0 0 0
Pensioners 37,785 0.2% +0.2 0 0 0 0
Mebyon Kernow 14,922 0.1% +0.1 0 0 0 0
Animals Count 13,201 0.1% +0.1 0 0 0 0
Scottish Socialist 10,404 0.1% −0.3 0 0 0 0
Duncan Robertson (Independent) 10,189 0.1% +0.1 0 0 0 0
Total 15,072,325 69 -6 0 100
All parties with over 10,000 votes listed.

Northern Ireland

Party Candidate Seats Loss/Gain First Preference Votes
Number  % of vote
Sinn Féin Bairbre de Brún 1 0 126,184 25.8
DUP Diane Dodds 1 0 88,346 18.1
UCU-NF Jim Nicholson 1 0 82,892 17.0
SDLP Alban Maginness 0 0 78,489 16.1
TUV Jim Allister 0 0 66,197 13.5
Alliance Ian Parsley 0 0 26,699 5.5
Green (NI) Steven Agnew 0 0 15,764 3.2
Turnout4 488,891 42.8

Source: BBC News

By European Political Group

EP Group MEPs UK Party MEPs
European Conservatives and Reformists 26 Conservative 25
Conservatives and Unionists 1
Europe of Freedom and Democracy 13 UKIP 13
Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats 13 Labour 13
Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe 11 Liberal Democrats 11
The Greens–European Free Alliance 5 Green Party of England and Wales 2
Scottish National Party 2
Plaid Cymru 1
European United Left-Nordic Green Left 1 Sinn Féin 1
Non-Inscrits 3 British National Party 2
Democratic Unionist 1

Constituencies and representation

A ballot paper for the London constituency, showing 14 parties and five independent candidates to vote for, photographed at a polling booth in Hackney.

As has been the case since 1999, the electoral constituencies were based on the government's nine English regions, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales, creating a total of 12 constituencies. On 31 July 2007, in line with the required reduction in representation from the United Kingdom, the Electoral Commission recommended reductions in representation from Scotland, and from 5 English regions, resulting in new representation as below:

Constituency Representation
in 2004
Representation
in 2009
Net Gain/Loss
East Midlands 6 5 −1
East of England 7 7 No Change
London 9 8 −1
North East England 3 3 No Change
North West England 9 8 −1
South East England 10 10 No Change
South West England1 7 6 −1
West Midlands2 7 6 −1
Yorkshire and the Humber 6 6 No Change
Wales 4 4 No Change
Scotland 7 6 −1
Northern Ireland 3 3 No Change

The recommended changes were approved by the UK Parliament in 2008.5

1 Includes Gibraltar, the only British overseas territory which is part of the European Union.
2 Had the Treaty of Lisbon come into force prior to these elections, the UK would have been entitled to a 73rd MEP. Were the Electoral Commission to perform a reallocation in keeping with the same procedures they used to allocate 72 MEPs, the extra MEP would have been allocated to the West Midlands constituency,6 preserving its representation at 7 rather than reducing it to 6.

Source: The Electoral Commission

MEPs retiring

Conservative

Labour

UKIP

Liberal Democrat

Independent

MEPs defeated

Labour

Traditional Unionist Voice

Opinion polls

In the run up to the election, several polling organisations carried out public opinion polling in regards to voting intentions in Great Britain (i.e. the UK excluding Northern Ireland, which is alwayscitation needed excluded from such voting intention surveys). Results of such polls are displayed below.

The following chart shows the results from all opinion polls displayed in the table below, with each line's colour corresponding to a political party, where blue shows the Conservatives, red shows Labour, purple shows the UK Independence Party (UKIP), yellow shows the Liberal Democrats, and grey shows other parties.

Opinion Polling Chart for the European Elections 2009 UK.png

ComRes, ICM, Populus and YouGov are members of the British Polling Council, and abide by its disclosure rules. BPIX is not a member of the BPC, and does not publish detailed methodology and findings.

Date(s)
conducted
Polling organisation/client Cons Lab UKIP Lib Dem Others first party lead
4 June 2009 European Parliament Election Result, 2009 (United Kingdom) 27.7% 15.7% 16.5% 13.7% 26.4% 11.2% over UKIP
3 June 2009 YouGov/Daily Telegraph 26% 16% 18% 15% 25% 8% over UKIP
31 May 2009 ComRes/Green Party
of England and Wales
24% 22% 17% 14% 24% 2% over Lab
29 May 2009 YouGov/Daily Telegraph 27% 17% 16% 15% 26% 10% over Lab
28 May 2009 ICM/Sunday Telegraph 29% 17% 10% 20% 24% 9% over LD
28 May 2009 Populus/Times 30% 16% 19% 12% 22% 11% over UKIP
21 May 2009 ICM/Guardian 30% 24% 10% 18% 17% 6% over Lab
16 May 2009 YouGov/Daily Telegraph 28% 22% 15% 17% 17% 6% over Lab
16 May 2009 BPIX/Mail on Sunday 30% 17% 17% 15% 5% 13% over Lab & UKIP
14 May 2009 ComRes/UKIP 28% 23% 15% 14% 20% 5% over Lab
14 May 2009 YouGov/Sun 29% 20% 15% 19% 14% 9% over Lab
10 May 2009 Populus/Times 34% 25% 6% 20% 14% 9% over Lab
8 May 2009 YouGov/Sunday Times 36% 25% 7% 20% 13% 11% over Lab
4 May 2009 ICM/TPA 32% 28% 9% 22% 8% 4% over Lab
8 January 2009 YouGov/TPA 35% 29% 7% 15% 15% 6% over Lab
10 June 2004 European Parliament Election Result, 2004 (United Kingdom) 26.7% 22.6% 16.1% 14.9% 19.7% 4.1% over Lab

See also

References

External links








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