IIHF European Junior Championships

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The IIHF European Junior Championships were an annual ice hockey tournament organized by the International Ice Hockey Federation and held from 1968 to 1998, with an unofficial tournament being held in 1967.1 The tournament was played as a U19 tournament from 1968-1976. In 1977, the IIHF created the IIHF World Junior Championships, and the U19 championships became U18. The tournament was dominated by the Russians (and Soviets), Czechs (and Czechoslovaks), Swedes and Finns, winning all but two of the medals in the 31 years it was held.

The U18 Championships remained strong until 1999, when the new IIHF World U18 Championships were introduced, thus rendering the U18 European Championships redundant. Two European Divisions continued until 2000, but were tiered qualifiers, alongside Asian Divisions, with promotion and relegation to the World Group B.

Champions

U19

Year Gold Silver Bronze Host
1967 (unofficial)  Soviet Union  Finland  Sweden Yaroslavl, Russian SFSR,  Soviet Union
1968  Czechoslovakia  Soviet Union  Sweden Tampere,  Finland
1969  Soviet Union  Sweden  Czechoslovakia Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Bavaria,  West Germany
1970  Soviet Union  Czechoslovakia  Sweden Geneva,   Switzerland
1971  Soviet Union  Sweden  Czechoslovakia Prešov, Slovak SR,  Czechoslovakia
1972  Sweden  Soviet Union  Czechoslovakia Boden, Luleå, Skellefteå,  Sweden
1973  Soviet Union  Sweden  Czechoslovakia Leningrad, Russian SFSR,  Soviet Union
1974  Sweden  Soviet Union  Finland Herisau, Appenzell Ausserrhoden,   Switzerland
1975  Soviet Union  Czechoslovakia  Sweden Grenoble,  France
1976  Soviet Union  Sweden  Finland Koprivnice ,Opava, Czech SR,  Czechoslovakia

U18

Year Gold Silver Bronze Host
1977  Sweden  Czechoslovakia  Soviet Union Bremerhaven, Bremen,  West Germany
1978  Finland  Soviet Union  Sweden Helsinki, Vantaa,  Finland
1979  Czechoslovakia  Finland  Soviet Union Tychy, Katowice,  Poland
1980  Soviet Union  Czechoslovakia  Sweden Hradec Králové, Czech SR,  Czechoslovakia
1981  Soviet Union  Czechoslovakia  Sweden Minsk, Belorussian SSR,  Soviet Union
1982  Sweden  Czechoslovakia  Soviet Union Ängelholm, Tyringe,  Sweden
1983  Soviet Union  Finland  Czechoslovakia Oslo,  Norway
1984  Soviet Union  Czechoslovakia  Sweden Rosenheim, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Füssen, Bad Tölz, Bavaria  West Germany
1985  Sweden  Soviet Union  Czechoslovakia Anglet,  France
1986  Finland  Sweden  Czechoslovakia Düsseldorf, Ratingen, Krefeld, North-Rhine-Westphalia,  West Germany
1987  Sweden  Czechoslovakia  Soviet Union Tampere, Kouvola, Hämeenlinna,  Finland
1988  Czechoslovakia  Finland  Soviet Union Frýdek-Místek, Vsetín, Olomouc, Prerov, Czech Socialist Republic,  Czechoslovakia
1989  Soviet Union  Czechoslovakia  Finland Kiev, Ukrainian SSR,  Soviet Union
1990  Sweden  Soviet Union  Czechoslovakia Örnsköldsvik, Sollefteå,  Sweden
1991  Czechoslovakia  Soviet Union  Finland Spišská Nová Ves, Prešov, Slovakia,  Czechoslovakia
1992  Czechoslovakia  Sweden  Russia Lillehammer, Hamar,  Norway
1993  Sweden  Russia  Czech Republic Nowy Targ, Oswiecim,  Poland
1994  Sweden  Russia  Czech Republic Jyväskylä,  Finland
1995  Finland  Germany  Sweden Berlin,  Germany
1996  Russia  Finland  Sweden Ufa, Russia
1997  Finland  Sweden   Switzerland Znojmo, Trebic,  Czech Republic
1998  Sweden  Finland  Russia Malung, Mora,  Sweden

Medal Table

Country Gold medal icon.svg Gold Silver medal icon.svg Silver Bronze medal icon.svg Bronze Medals
 Russia
 Soviet Union
 
1
11
12
2
7
9
2
5
7
5
23
28
 Sweden 10 7 9 26
 Czech Republic
 Czechoslovakia
 
0
5
5
0
9
9
2
8
10
2
22
24
 Finland 4 5 4 13
 Germany 0 1 0 1
  Switzerland 0 0 1 1

European Division I (Qualifier for World Group B)

Year Gold Silver Bronze Host
1999  Latvia  Slovenia  Lithuania  Romania
2000  Kazakhstan  Estonia  Slovenia  Slovenia

References

  1. ^ Dupalcey page 528







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