Jennifer Gillom

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Coach Jennifer Gillom
WNBA's Connecticut Sun
Coach
Born (1964-06-13) June 13, 1964 (age 49)
Abbeville, Mississippi
Nationality American
College Mississippi
WNBA career 1997–2003
Profile WNBA coach profile
WNBA head coach of
Minnesota Lynx (2009)
Los Angeles Sparks (2010–2011)
WNBA assistant coach of
Minnesota Lynx (2008)
Washington Mystics (2012)
Connecticut Sun (2013–present)
Coaching record
Regular season 31–47 (.397)
Postseason 0–2 (.000)
Jennifer Gillom
Medal record
Women's Basketball
World University Games
Gold 1985 World University Games Kobe, Japan Team Competition
FIBA World Championship for Women
Gold 1986 World Championships Moscow Team Competition
Pan American Games
Gold 1987 Indiana USA Team Competition
Olympic Games
Gold 1988 Seoul Basketball
Jennifer Gillom
Medal record
Women’s Basketball
Assistant Coach for  United States
Olympic Games
Gold 2012 London, England Team Competition
Assistant Coach for  United States
FIBA World Championship for Women
Gold 2010 Ostrava and Karlovy Vary, Brazil Team Competition

Jennifer "Grandmama" Gillom (born June 13, 1964 in Abbeville, Mississippi) is a former WNBA basketball player who played for the Phoenix Mercury from 1997 to 2002, before finishing her playing career with the Los Angeles Sparks in 2003. Gillom is also a former Sparks head coach, and also coached the Minnesota Lynx; she was most recently hired as an assistant coach of the Connecticut Sun for the 2013 season.

Gillom played college basketball at the University of Mississippi and helped the United States Basketball Team to a gold medal in women's basketball in the 1988 Summer Olympics.1 Gillom signed with the Mercury in 1996 where she was All-WNBA in 1998 and won the Kim Perrot Sportsmanship Award in her final season.

Gillom was the head coach of the Xavier College Preparatory High School basketball team in Phoenix, Arizona in 2006. Starting in the 2008 season, Gillom served as an assistant coach for the Minnesota Lynx. In June 2009, she was named head coach of the team. She succeeded Don Zierden, who resigned to accept an assistant coaching job under Flip Saunders of the Washington Wizards.

In 2009, Gillom was elected to the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame, located in Knoxville, Tennessee.2

USA Basketball

Player

Gillom played for the USA World University Games team in Kobe, Japan in 1985. The team brought home a silver medal, after falling to the USSR. The team trailed by 18 points at one time, mounted a come-back attempt but fell short, losing 87–81. Gillom was the second leading scorer for the USA team, with 12.8 points per game.3 The following year, Gillom played for the USA team at the World Championships, in Moscow. This time, the USA team would meet the USSR in the title game and emerge victorious, winning the gold medal with a score of 108–88. Gillom averaged 2.8 points per game.4

Gillom was named to the team representing the USA at the 1987 Pan American Games, held in Indianapolis, Indiana in August. The USA team won all four of their games winning the gold medal for the event. She averaged 9.5 points per game.5 Gillom continued with the national team at the 1988 Olympics in Seoul, South Korea, held in September. The team won all five games which resulted in the gold medal. Gillom averaged 2.8 points per game.1

Coach

Gillom was named assistant coach of the USA National team in preparation for competition in the 2010 World Championships and 2012 Olympics. Because many team members were still playing in the WNBA until just prior to the event, the team had only one day of practice with the entire team before leaving for Ostrava and Karlovy Vary, Czech Republic. Even with limited practice, the team managed to win their first game against Greece by 26 points. The team continued to dominate with victory margins exceeding 20 points in the first five games. Several players shared scoring honors, with Swin Cash, Angel McCoughtry, Maya Moore, Diana Taurasi, Lindsay Whalen, and Sylvia Fowles all ending as high scorer in the first few games. The sixth game was against undefeated Australia—the USA jumped out to a 24 point lead, but the Australian team cut the lead back to single digits late in the game. The USA prevailed 83–75. The USA won their next two games by over thirty points, then faced the host team, the Czech Republic, in the championship game. The USA team had only a five point lead at halftime, which was cut to three points, but the Czechs never got closer, and went on to win the championship and gold medal.6

She continued as an assistant at the 2012 Olympics in London.7

Career statistics

WNBA Career Totals

Year Team G GS MIN FGM FGA FTM FTA 3PTM 3PTA REB AST STL TO BLK PTS
1997 PHX 28 28 874 163 376 94 121 20 65 151 21 37 58 15 440
1998 PHX 30 30 962 228 492 137 195 31 82 219 42 50 89 10 624
1999 PHX 32 32 1,095 163 428 141 177 18 72 184 54 37 87 7 485
2000 PHX 30 30 826 139 316 79 106 19 69 116 45 21 59 29 376
2001 PHX 32 32 858 150 355 71 96 24 70 127 35 31 71 19 395
2002 PHX 31 31 874 166 400 105 131 36 93 116 37 29 61 21 473
2003 LA 33 10 397 40 97 16 21 7 26 55 21 16 9 3 103
Totals 216 193 5,886 1,049 2,464 643 847 155 477 968 255 221 434 104 2,896

WNBA Career Averages

Year Team MIN FG% FT% 3PT% REB AST STL TO BLK PTS
1997 PHX 31.2 .434 .777 .308 5.4 0.8 1.3 2.0 0.5 15.7
1998 PHX 32.1 .463 .703 .378 7.3 1.4 1.7 3.0 0.3 20.8
1999 PHX 34.2 .381 .797 .250 5.8 1.7 1.2 2.7 0.2 15.2
2000 PHX 27.5 .440 .745 .275 3.9 1.5 0.7 2.0 1.0 12.5
2001 PHX 26.8 .423 .740 .343 4.0 1.1 1.0 2.2 0.6 12.3
2002 PHX 28.2 .415 .802 .387 3.7 1.2 0.9 2.0 0.7 15.3
2003 LA 12.0 .412 .762 .269 1.7 0.6 0.5 0.3 0.1 3.1
Totals 27.3 .426 .759 .325 4.5 1.2 1.0 2.0 0.5 13.4

External links

Notes

  1. ^ a b "Games of the XXIVth Olympiad -- 1988". USA Basketball. Retrieved 2009-08-02. 
  2. ^ "WBHOF Inductees". WBHOF. Retrieved 2009-08-01. 
  3. ^ "THIRTEENTH WORLD UNIVERSITY GAMES -- 1985". USA Basketball. Retrieved 3 Nov 2013. 
  4. ^ "TENTH WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP FOR WOMEN -- 1986". USA Basketball. Retrieved 3 June 2010. 
  5. ^ "TENTH PAN AMERICAN GAMES -- 1987". USA Basketball. Retrieved 3 Nov 2013. 
  6. ^ "SIXTEENTH WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP FOR WOMEN -- 2010". USA Basketball. Retrieved 17 May 2013. 
  7. ^ "Doug Bruno, Jennifer Gillom, Marynell Meadors Return To USA Basketball As 2012 U.S. Olympic Team Assistant Coaches". USA Basketball. Jan 20, 2012. Retrieved 20 January 2012. 
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Michael Cooper
Los Angeles Sparks head coach
2010-2011
Succeeded by
Joe Bryant
Preceded by
Don Zierden
Minnesota Lynx Head Coach
2009
Succeeded by
Cheryl Reeve







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