Job skirt

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A job skirt is a conservatively-styled skirt that resembles the style of trousers typical to business casual attire. They exist in both A-line and straight cut, figure hugging styles similar to pencil skirts. Job skirts vary in length, but are most commonly either slightly above or slightly below knee-length. Occasionally, they may be miniskirts or ankle-length.1 There is also significant variation in waistlines, ranging from just above the waist to just below the breasts. Generally a higher waistline is paired with a higher hemline so that the general length of the skirt remains the same. The name "job skirt" is given because they are generally considered acceptable and are often preferred as work wear in positions held frequently by women such as secretaries, teachers and flight attendants. At the same time, job skirts are well liked by women for dress-down occasions outside the workplace although these usually have longer slits to improve mobility during social activity.

Job skirts are usually made of fabrics common to business casual slacks, such as khaki or corduroy, but as denim has become more acceptable in career lines, jean skirts fitting the same description are also viewed as job skirts. Some job skirts come with matching jackets as a suit.2

Job skirts provide an attractive but professional figure that emphasises a thin waist, curved hips and slender legs.

Characteristics

The common characteristics of a job skirt are:

  • Solid color (tan is common)
  • A generally tailored appearance
  • A fitted waistline
  • A front fly, resembling trousers
  • Belt loops
  • Rear pockets (sometimes)
  • Worn with stockings and/or high heels
  • A slit at the back to aid mobility

References








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