KCNIP1

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Kv channel interacting protein 1

PDB rendering based on 1s1e.
Available structures
PDB Ortholog search: PDBe, RCSB
Identifiers
Symbols KCNIP1 ; KCHIP1; VABP
External IDs OMIM604660 MGI1917607 HomoloGene22824 GeneCards: KCNIP1 Gene
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE KCNIP1 221307 at tn.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez 30820 70357
Ensembl ENSG00000182132 ENSMUSG00000053519
UniProt Q9NZI2 Q9JJ57
RefSeq (mRNA) NM_001034837 NM_001190885
RefSeq (protein) NP_001030009 NP_001177814
Location (UCSC) Chr 5:
169.78 – 170.16 Mb
Chr 11:
33.63 – 33.99 Mb
PubMed search [1] [2]

Kv channel-interacting protein 1 also known as KChIP1 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the KCNIP1 gene.12

Function

This gene encodes a member of the family of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel-interacting proteins (KCNIPs, also frequently called "KChIP"), which belong to the recoverin branch of the EF-hand superfamily.3 Members of the KCNIP family are small calcium binding proteins. They all have EF-hand-like domains, and differ from each other in the N-terminus. They are integral subunit components of native Kv4 channel complexes. They may regulate A-type currents, and hence neuronal excitability, in response to changes in intracellular calcium. Alternative splicing results in multiple transcript variant encoding different isoforms.2

References

  1. ^ An WF, Bowlby MR, Betty M, Cao J, Ling HP, Mendoza G, Hinson JW, Mattsson KI, Strassle BW, Trimmer JS, Rhodes KJ (Feb 2000). "Modulation of A-type potassium channels by a family of calcium sensors". Nature 403 (6769): 553–556. doi:10.1038/35000592. PMID 10676964. 
  2. ^ a b "Entrez Gene: KCNIP1 Kv channel interacting protein 1". 
  3. ^ Burgoyne RD (2007). "Neuronal calcium sensor proteins: generating diversity in neuronal Ca2+ signalling". Nat. Rev. Neurosci. 8 (3): 182–193. doi:10.1038/nrn2093. PMC 1887812. PMID 17311005. 

See also

Further reading

External links

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.








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