List of Democratic National Conventions

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

This is a list of Democratic National Conventions. These conventions are the presidential nominating conventions of the Democratic Party of the United States. Click on the year to take you to the corresponding article about the convention. (Conventions whose nominees won the subsequent presidential election are tinted in light blue.)

Date1 Location Permanent Chairman Platform
2
Ballots1 Presidential Nominee
[acceptance speech]2
Vice Presidential Nominee
May 21–23, 1832 The Athenaeum and Warfield's Church, Baltimore Robert Lucas of Ohio (none)
1
Pres. Andrew Jackson of Tennessee1 Martin Van Buren of New York
May 20–22, 1835 Fourth Presbyterian Church, Baltimore Andrew Stevenson of Virginia (none)
1
Vice Pres. Martin Van Buren of New York Richard M. Johnson of Kentucky
May 5–6, 1840 The Assembly Rooms, Baltimore William Carroll of Tennessee 1840
platform
1
Pres. Martin Van Buren of New York None2
May 27–29, 1844 Odd Fellows Hall, Baltimore Hendrick Bradley Wright of Pennsylvania 1844
platform
9
James K. Polk of Tennessee George M. Dallas of Pennsylvania3
May 22–25, 1848 Universalist Church, Baltimore Andrew Stevenson of Virginia 1848
platform
4
Lewis Cass of Michigan William O. Butler of Kentucky
June 1–5, 1852 Maryland Institute, Baltimore John W. Davis of Indiana 1852
platform
49
Franklin Pierce of New Hampshire William R. King of Alabama
June 2–6, 1856 Smith and Nixon's Hall, Cincinnati John Elliot Ward of Georgia 1856
platform
17
James Buchanan of Pennsylvania John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky
April 23-May 3, 1860 South Carolina Institute Hall, Charleston Caleb Cushing of Massachusetts (see below)
57
none (deadlocked) none (deadlocked)
June 18–23, 1860 Front Street Theater, Baltimore Caleb Cushing 4
David Tod of Ohio
1860 N.D.
platform
2
Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois5 Herschel V. Johnson of Georgia5 6
August 29–31, 1864 The Amphitheatre, Chicago Horatio Seymour of New York 1864
platform
1
George B. McClellan of New Jersey George H. Pendleton of Ohio
July 4–9, 1868 Tammany Hall, New York Horatio Seymour of New York 1868
platform
22
Horatio Seymour of New York Francis P. Blair, Jr. of Missouri
July 9–10, 1872 7 Ford's Grand Opera House, Baltimore James R. Doolittle of Wisconsin 1872
platform
1
Horace Greeley of
New York 7
B. Gratz Brown of Missouri 7
June 27–29, 1876 Merchant's Exchange Building, St. Louis John A. McClernand of Illinois 1876
platform
2
Samuel J. Tilden of New York Thomas A. Hendricks of Indiana
June 22–24, 1880 Cincinnati Music Hall John W. Stevenson of Kentucky 1880
platform
2
Winfield S. Hancock of Pennsylvania William H. English of Indiana
July 8–11, 1884 Interstate Exposition Building, Chicago William F. Vilas of Wisconsin 1884
platform
2
Grover Cleveland of New York Thomas A. Hendricks of Indiana
June 5–7, 1888 Exposition Building, St. Louis Patrick A. Collins of Massachusetts 1888
platform
1
Pres. Grover Cleveland of New York Allen G. Thurman of Ohio
June 21–23, 1892 Wigwam, Chicago William Lyne Wilson of West Virginia 1892
platform
1
ex-Pres. Grover Cleveland of New York Adlai E. Stevenson I of Illinois
July 7–11, 1896 8 Chicago Coliseum Stephen M. White of California 1896
platform
about 5 William Jennings Bryan of Nebraska 9 Arthur Sewall of Maine
July 4–6, 1900 Convention Hall, Kansas City James D. Richardson of Tennessee 1900
platform
1
William Jennings Bryan of Nebraska ex-Vice Pres. Adlai E. Stevenson I of Illinois
July 6–9, 1904 St. Louis Coliseum Champ Clark of Missouri 1904
platform
1
Alton B. Parker of New York Henry G. Davis of West Virginia
July 7–10, 1908 Denver Arena Auditorium Henry D. Clayton of Alabama 1908
platform
1
William Jennings Bryan of Nebraska John W. Kern of Indiana
June 25-July 2, 1912 Fifth Regiment Armory, Baltimore Ollie M. James of Kentucky 1912
platform
46
Woodrow Wilson of New Jersey Thomas R. Marshall of Indiana
June 14–16, 1916 Convention Hall, St. Louis Ollie M. James of Kentucky 1916
platform
1
Pres. Woodrow Wilson of New Jersey (speech) Vice Pres. Thomas R. Marshall of Indiana
June 28-July 6, 1920 Civic Auditorium, San Francisco Joseph T. Robinson of Arkansas 1920
platform
43
James M. Cox of Ohio Franklin D. Roosevelt of New York
June 24-July 9, 1924 Madison Square Garden, New York Thomas J. Walsh of Montana 1924
platform
103
John W. Davis of New York Charles W. Bryan of Nebraska
June 26–29, 1928 Sam Houston Hall, Houston Joseph T. Robinson of Arkansas 1928
platform
1
Alfred E. Smith of New York (speech) Joseph T. Robinson of Arkansas
June 27-July 2, 1932 Chicago Stadium Thomas J. Walsh of Montana 1932
platform
4
Franklin D. Roosevelt of New York (speech) John Nance Garner of Texas
June 23–27, 1936 Convention Hall, Philadelphia Joseph T. Robinson of Arkansas 1936
platform
Acclamation Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt of New York (speech) Vice Pres. John Nance Garner of Texas
July 15–18, 1940 Chicago Stadium Alben W. Barkley of Kentucky 1940
platform
1
Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt of New York (speech) Henry A. Wallace of Iowa
July 19–21, 1944 Chicago Stadium Samuel D. Jackson of Indiana 1944
platform
1
Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt of New York (speech) Harry S. Truman of Missouri
July 12–14, 1948 10 Convention Hall, Philadelphia Sam Rayburn of Texas 1948
platform
1
Pres. Harry S. Truman of Missouri (speech) Alben W. Barkley of Kentucky
July 21–26, 1952 International Amphitheatre, Chicago Sam Rayburn of Texas 1952
platform
3
Adlai E. Stevenson of Illinois (speech) John J. Sparkman of Alabama
August 13–17, 1956 International Amphitheatre, Chicago Sam Rayburn of Texas 1956
platform
1
Adlai E. Stevenson of Illinois (speech) Estes Kefauver of Tennessee
July 11–15, 1960 Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena and Memorial Coliseum Leroy Collins of Florida 1960
platform
1
John F. Kennedy of Massachusetts (speech) Lyndon B. Johnson of Texas
August 24–27, 1964 Convention Center, Atlantic City John W. McCormack of Massachusetts 1964
platform
Acclamation Pres. Lyndon B. Johnson of Texas (speech) Hubert Humphrey of Minnesota
August 26–29, 1968 International Amphitheatre, Chicago Carl Albert of Oklahoma 1968
platform
1
V.P. Hubert Humphrey of Minnesota (speech) Edmund S. Muskie of Maine
July 10–13, 1972 Miami Beach Convention Center Lawrence F. O'Brien of Massachusetts 1972
platform
1
George S. McGovern of South Dakota (speech) Thomas F. Eagleton of Missouri 11
July 12–15, 1976 Madison Square Garden, New York Lindy Boggs of Louisiana 1976
platform
1
Jimmy Carter of Georgia (speech) Walter Mondale of Minnesota
August 11–14, 1980 Madison Square Garden, New York Tip O'Neill of Massachusetts 1980
platform
1
Pres. Jimmy Carter of Georgia (speech) Vice Pres. Walter Mondale of Minnesota
July 16–19, 1984 Moscone Center, San Francisco Martha Layne Collins of Kentucky 1984
platform
1
ex-V.P. Walter Mondale of Minnesota (speech) Geraldine A. Ferraro of New York
July 18–21, 1988 The Omni, Atlanta James C. Wright of Texas 1988
platform
1
Michael S. Dukakis of Massachusetts (speech) Lloyd M. Bentsen, Jr. of Texas
July 13–16, 1992 Madison Square Garden, New York Ann Richards of Texas 1992
platform
1
William J. Clinton of Arkansas (speech) Albert A. Gore, Jr. of Tennessee
August 26–29, 1996 United Center, Chicago Richard Gephardt of Missouri and Tom Daschle of South Dakota 1996
platform
Acclamation Pres. William J. Clinton of Arkansas (speech) Vice Pres. Albert A. Gore, Jr. of Tennessee
August 14–17, 2000 Staples Center, Los Angeles Terry McAuliffe of New York 2000
platform
Acclamation Vice Pres. Albert A. Gore, Jr. of Tennessee (speech) Joseph I. Lieberman of Connecticut
July 26–29, 2004 FleetCenter, Boston Bill Richardson of New Mexico 2004
platform
1
John F. Kerry of Massachusetts (speech) John R. Edwards of North Carolina
August 25–28, 2008 Pepsi Center and Invesco Field, Denver Nancy Pelosi of California 2008
platform
1/Acclamation Barack H. Obama of Illinois (speech) Joseph R. Biden of Delaware
September 4–6, 2012 Time Warner Cable Arena, Charlotte Antonio Villaraigosa of California 2012
platform
1/Acclamation Pres. Barack H. Obama of Illinois (speech) Vice Pres. Joseph R. Biden of Delaware

Footnotes

1 [1832] A resolution endorsing "the repeated nominations which he [Jackson] has received in various parts of the Union" was passed by the convention.
2 [1840] A resolution stating "that the convention deem it expedient at the present time not to choose between the individuals in nomination, but to leave the decision to their Republican fellow-citizens in the several states" was passed by the convention. Most Van Buren electors voted for Richard Mentor Johnson of Kentucky for the vice presidency; others voted for Littleton Waller Tazewell of Virginia and James K. Polk of Tennessee in the election of 1840.
3 [1844] Silas Wright of New York was first nominated and he declined the nomination.
4 [1860 June] Caleb Cushing resigned as permanent chairman.
5 [1860 June] Douglas and Johnson were chosen as the candidates of the Front Street Theater convention after most of the Southern delegations walked out. The convention bolters soon formed their own convention, located at the Maryland Institute, also in Baltimore, on June 28, 1860. At their convention Caleb Cushing again served as permanent chairman and John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky was nominated for the presidency and Joseph Lane of Oregon was nominated for the vice presidency. (1860 Southern Democratic platform)
6 [1860 June] Benjamin Fitzpatrick of Alabama was first nominated but he declined the nomination.
7 [1872] Greeley and B. Gratz Brown had already been endorsed by the Liberal Republican Party, meeting on May 1 in Cincinnati. A dissident group of Straight-Out Democrats, meeting in Louisville, Kentucky on September 3, nominated Charles O'Conor of New York for President and John Quincy Adams II of Massachusetts for Vice President, but both men declined the nomination.3
8 [1896] "Gold" Democrats opposed to the Free Silver plank of the 1896 platform and to Wm J. Bryan's candidacy convened as the National Democratic Party in Indianapolis on September 2, and nominated John M. Palmer of Illinois for President and former Governor Simon Bolivar Buckner of Kentucky for Vice President.
9 [1896] Bryan was later nominated for President in St. Louis, together with Thomas E. Watson of Georgia for Vice President, by the National Silver Republican Party meeting on July 22, and by the People's Party (Populists) meeting on July 25.4
10 [1948] Breakaway delegations left the Philadelphia Convention for conventions of the Progressive and States Rights Democratic Parties. The Progressives, meeting on July 23, also in Philadelphia, nominated former Vice President Henry A. Wallace of Iowa for President and Senator Glen H. Taylor of Idaho for Vice President. (1948 Progressive Party platform) ¶ The States' Rights Democrats (or "Dixiecrats"), meeting in Birmingham, Alabama on July 17, nominated Governors J. Strom Thurmond of South Carolina for President and Fielding Wright of Mississippi for Vice President. (1948 States' Rights Democratic platform)5
11 [1972] Eagleton withdrew his candidacy after the convention and was replaced by R. Sargent Shriver, Jr. of Maryland.

Keynote speakers

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Thompson (ed.), Margaret C. (1983). Presidential Elections Since 1789. Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly. p. 65. ISBN 0-87187-268-4. 
  2. ^ a b American Presidency Project, University of California, Santa Barbara, at http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/platforms.php (retrieved February 3, 2012)
  3. ^ Tim Taylor, The Book of Presidents, Arno Press, New York, 1972, page 215. ISBN 0-405-00226-2
  4. ^ Tim Taylor, The Book of Presidents, Arno Press, New York, 1972, page 283.
  5. ^ Tim Taylor, The Book of Presidents, Arno Press, New York, 1972, page 470.
  6. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=58112
  7. ^ a b http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/politics/documents/Past_Democratic_Keynote_Speakers.html
  8. ^ http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp--rv/politics/documents/Past_Democratic_Keynote_Speakers.html
  9. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=58234
  10. ^ http://partners.nytimes.com/library/politics/camp/200629convention-dem-ra.html
  11. ^ Hail to the Chief
  12. ^ http://partners.nytimes.com/library/politics/camp/280627convention-dem-ra.html
  13. ^ http://partners.nytimes.com/library/politics/camp/320628convention-dem-ra.html
  14. ^ http://partners.nytimes.com/library/politics/camp/360625convention-dem-ra.html
  15. ^ http://partners.nytimes.com/library/politics/camp/400716convention-dem-ra.html
  16. ^ http://partners.nytimes.com/library/politics/camp/440720convention-dem-ra.html
  17. ^ a b c http://www.loc.gov/rr/main/democratic_conventions.pdf
  18. ^ http://partners.nytimes.com/library/politics/camp/520722convention-dem-ra.html
  19. ^ http://partners.nytimes.com/library/politics/camp/560814convention-dem-ra.html
  20. ^ Goldstein, Richard (July 17, 2000). "John Pastore, Prominent Figure in Rhode Island Politics for Three Decades, Dies at 93". The New York Times. Retrieved May 8, 2010. 
  21. ^ Time magazine, "200 Faces for the Future," 1974
  22. ^ "http://partners.nytimes.com/library/politics/camp/760713convention-dem-ra.html"







Creative Commons License