List of people born in Ukraine

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List of Ukrainians

This is a list of individuals who were born and lived in territories currently in Ukraine, both ethnic Ukrainians and those of other ethnicities. Throughout Eastern European history, Ukrainian lands were ethnically and culturally diverse, with a number of other ethnic groups living among the Ukrainians. Originally united with Belarus and Muscovy under the state of Kievan Rus', a schism took place after the Mongol invasion, as the Muscovite lands stayed under Mongol/Tatar rule for another century and Ruthenian (Ukrainian/Belarusian) lands were taken over by the ascendant Duchy of Lithuania, as it helped Ruthenians drive out the Mongol invaders. During this time a language separate from Old East Slavic evolved on the territory of the progenitor Russian principality Muscovy, while a Ruthenian language continued evolving on the territory of central Kievan Rus' (Ukraine and Belarus), whose people were known as the Ruthenians. While Muscovy stayed under Mongol control for over a hundred years, it absorbed much Mongol vocabulary, thus separating modern Russian from modern Belarussian and Ukrainian. Lithuania's unification with Poland into the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth further added a Polonization factor to most of Ruthenian lands. In the 1930s, the Holodomor and the Stalinist purges decimated the Ukrainian population in eastern Ukraine. As ethnic Russians were brought into areas depopulated of Ukrainians, this led to increased Russification in the east of Ukraine.

Although Ukrainians have always been the largest ethnic group in Ukraine, ethnic Ruthenians were mostly a rural people and often became the minority in the cities and towns that we growing on their ethnic territory. For example, due to the imperialistic anti-Ukrainian policies of the Russian Empire and Moscow's Communists, Kyiv by the 1920s was approximately 1/3 Jewish and 1/3 Russian, with the remaining third constituting ethnic Ukrainians, Poles, and Germans. In dictator-ruled Poland between the World Wars, similar anti-Ukrainian policies were implemented. For instance, a similar demographic situation emerged in Lviv (then occupied by militaristic dictator-ruled Poland) where the population was dominated by Poles and Jews. However, during the Second World War, the Jewish population of Ukraine was virtually eliminated by the Holocaust instigated by the Nazi Germany, as well as due to Jews fleeing the German invasion, mostly eastward towards Russia. Although many Jews returned to Ukraine after the war and some moved there from other Republics (due to educational and career opportunities in Ukraine), ethnic Jews never regained their proportion of the pre-War population in Ukraine. The majority of the remaining Jews left for the United States, Israel and Germany in the decades immediately prior and after the fall of the Soviet Union.

Contents

Academics

Archeologists

Biologists/physicians

Chemists

Computer scientists

  • Ihor Partola - founding father of Ukrainian Computer Science
  • Oles' Pluschak - developer and inventor of the first Ukrainian computer (1947, Ivano-Frankivsk Computing Center)
  • Vuyko Ohten' - creator of the first Ukrainian programming language, LibertaUkrainica (1949, Lviv Ivan Franko Ukrainian University)

Doctors & surgeons

Economists

Engineers

Geographers

Historians

Mathematicians

Main article Ukrainian mathematicians

Philosophers

Physicists

Other academics

Arts

Architects

Painters

Sculptors

Performing arts

Actors/Actresses

Choreographers and dancers

Professional dancer & choreographer, Adabel Guerrero of Ukrainian descent.

Film and theatre directors

Models

Musicians

The group of Ukrainian musicians.

Bandurists

Composers

Pianists

Organists

Strings

Conductors

Other

Singers

Opera

Pop singers and artists

Other performing artists

Literary arts

Writers

Poets

Business

Astronauts

Many cosmonauts of the Soviet Union and modern Russia were ethnic Ukrainians or come from Ukraine. See Category:Ukrainian cosmonauts for the full list.

Cossack Hetmans

Military figures

Intelligence

Politicians

Ukrainian politicians

Zionists and Israeli politicians

Bolsheviks and Soviet politicians

Soviet dissidents

Russian politicians

Polish politicians

Austrian politicians

Belgian politicians

Bulgarian politicians

Czechoslovak politicians

German politicians

Italian politicians

French politicians

American politicians

Canadian politicians

Chinese politicians

Crimean Tatar politicians

Religious leaders and theologians

Orthodox Christian

Greek Catholic

Roman Catholic

Jewish

Others

Sport

Archery

Basketball

Boxing

Chess

Fencing

Figure skating

Football (soccer)

Gymnastics

Ice hockey

Swimming

  • Yana Klochkova, swimmer (4 Olympic golds)
  • Lenny Krayzelburg, swimmer (now U.S. citizen); 4-time Olympic champion (100 m backstroke, 200-m backstroke, twice 4x100-m medley relay); 3-time world champion (100 m and 200-m backstroke, 4×100-m medley) and 2-time silver (4×100-m medley, 50-m backstroke); 3 world records (50-, 100-, and 200-m backstroke)
  • Maxim Podoprigora, Olympic swimmer

Tennis

Track & field

Weightlifting

Wrestling

Other athletes

Philanthropists

Other

See also

References

  1. ^ "Welcome to Ukraine". Wumag.kiev.ua. September 23, 2007. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 
  2. ^ "Khvoika, Vikentii". Encyclopediaofukraine.com. November 2, 1914. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 
  3. ^ "Наукова та громадська діяльність Ярослава Пастернака (1913–1969 рр.) – Автореферат". Avtoreferat.net. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 
  4. ^ a b c d e "Normanist theory". Encyclopediaofukraine.com. October 24, 1975. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 
  5. ^ "Bibliography, Pt II: 1914–1939". Web.ku.edu. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 
  6. ^ "Myron Korduba". Open Library. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 
  7. ^ "The Odessa Numismatics Museum". Museum.com.ua. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 
  8. ^ "Emigre Archival Ucrainica Retrieved: Prague, Kyiv, and Moscow". Archives.gov.ua. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 
  9. ^ HURI [huri@fas.harvard.edu]. "HURI Faculty and Staff". Huri.harvard.edu. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 
  10. ^ "Dr. Myron Hlynka, Queueing Theorist". Web2.uwindsor.ca. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 
  11. ^ "Amazon profile of Vitaly Chernetsky". Retrieved February 23, 2011. 
  12. ^ "Jarek Kubicki, помошник Радника Волі США на Украйин". jarek-kubicki-1.livejournal.com. Retrieved August 2, 2011. 
  13. ^ "Mission of Ukraine to European Communities – Publications". Ukraine-eu.mfa.gov.ua. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 
  14. ^ [file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/komputronik/Moje%20dokumenty/Video.doc The Vatican and Ukraine at the time shaping the Versailles System in 1918–1921]
  15. ^ "The 18th Maccabiah–Maccabiah Chai". JCC. Retrieved June 3, 2010. 
  16. ^ Beverley Smith, Dan Diamond (1997). A Year in Figure Skating. McClelland & Stewart. ISBN 0-7710-2755-9. Retrieved July 1, 2010. 
  17. ^ Peshkhatzki, Motti (June 9, 2006). "דינמו קייב לבית"ר: 220 אלף דולר על אנדריי אוברמקו" (in Hebrew). Retrieved July 6, 2008. 
  18. ^ "Jews in Sports: Table Tennis". Jewish Virtual Library. Retrieved May 25, 2010. 
  19. ^ "19-year-old Jewish Prodigy Bound for the NRL". Bulldogs Rugby League Club. May 9, 2007. Retrieved September 28, 2010. 







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