Pope Dionysius

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Pope Saint
Dionysius
Seeon-Seebruck, Kloster Seeon 23.JPG
Papacy began 22 July 259
Papacy ended 26 December 268
Predecessor Sixtus II
Successor Felix I
Personal details
Birth name Dionysius
Born ???
Greece ?
Died 26 December 268(268-12-26)
Rome, Roman Empire
Sainthood
Feast day 26 December

Pope Dionysius (died 26 December 268) was the Bishop of Rome or Pope from 22 July 259 to his death in 268.1

He may have been born in Magna Græcia, but this has not been verified. Dionysius was elected pope in 259, after the martyrdom of Sixtus II in 258. The Holy See had been vacant for nearly a year due to difficulty in electing a new pope during the violent persecution which Christians faced.1 When the persecution had begun to subside, Dionysius was raised to the office of Bishop of Rome. Emperor Valerian I, who had led the persecution, was captured and killed by the King of Persia in 260. The new emperor, Gallienus, issued an edict of toleration, restoring the churches, cemeteries and other properties it had held, leading to the nearly 40-year "Little Peace of the Church".2 To the new pope fell the task of reorganizing the Roman church, which had fallen into great disorder. On the protest of some of the faithful at Alexandria, he demanded from the bishop of Alexandria, also called Dionysius, explanations concerning his doctrine regarding the relation of God to the Logos, which was satisfied.1

Pope Dionysius sent large sums of money to the churches of Cappadocia, which had been devastated by the marauding Goths, to rebuild and to ransom those held captive. He brought order to the Church and procured a peace after Emperor Gallienus issued an edict of toleration which was to last until 303. He died on 26 December 268.1

In art, he is portrayed in papal vestments, along with a book.1

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Kirsch, Johann Peter (1909). "Pope St. Dionysius" in The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 5. New York: Robert Appleton Company.
  2. ^ Eusebius, Historia Ecclesiastica, 7.13; translated by G.A. Williamson, Eusebius: The History of the Church (Harmonsworth: Penguin, 1965), p. 299

External links

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Sixtus II
Bishop of Rome
Pope

259–268
Succeeded by
Felix I







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