Richard Bond

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Richard Norman Bond is a former Chairman of the Republican National Committee (RNC).

Bond earned a bachelor’s degree in English and Philosophy from Fordham University and a master's degree in Government from Georgetown University.

Bond served in a variety of positions at the Republican National Committee under Presidents Gerald Ford, Ronald Reagan, and George H.W. Bush prior to being elected Chairman in 1992.1 Despite the President’s tough defeat that year, the GOP held their ground in the Senate and gained 10 seats in the House of Representatives - the only time in history House seats have been gained during a presidential loss.citation needed The GOP also held their gubernatorial seats and net gained control of seven additional state legislative chambers.

In addition to his credentials at the RNC, Bond has served five presidential campaigns over the past twenty years, including the management of fifty state operations as national political director in Bush’s successful 1988 presidential campaign.234 Government posts include Deputy Chief of Staff to Vice President Bush, congressional press secretary, and member of the Board of Directors of the Peace Corps.

Bond remains a media spokesman for the Republican Party, commenting on national issues and current political trends, with appearances on network television and radio shows. The author of over forty articles on politics and government, Bond has also lectured at many colleges and universities, and has been quoted in a variety of national news magazines and major newspapers.

References

  1. ^ Tolchin, Martin (February 2, 1992). "New Chairman Installed to 'Invigorate' G.O.P.". The New York Times. 
  2. ^ Weinraub, Bernard (October 13, 1987). "Dole Ties New Hampshire Hopes to Iowa Strength". The New York Times. 
  3. ^ Weinraub, Bernard (February 4, 1988). "Bush Aide Accuses Dole Of Being 'Mean Spirited'". The New York Times. 
  4. ^ Rosenthal, Andrew (December 6, 1991). "Bush Names New Staff Chief and Campaign Team". The New York Times. 









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