San Lorenzo, California

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San Lorenzo
CDP
Location in Alameda County and the state of California
Location in Alameda County and the state of California
Coordinates: 37°40′52″N 122°07′28″W / 37.68111°N 122.12444°W / 37.68111; -122.12444Coordinates: 37°40′52″N 122°07′28″W / 37.68111°N 122.12444°W / 37.68111; -122.12444
Country  United States
State  California
County Alameda
Government
 • State Senate Ellen Corbett (D)1
 • State Assembly Bill Quirk (D)2
 • U. S. Congress Eric Swalwell (D)3
Area4
 • Total 2.770 sq mi (7.174 km2)
 • Land 2.763 sq mi (7.157 km2)
 • Water 0.007 sq mi (0.017 km2)  0.24%
Elevation5 36 ft (11 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 23,452
 • Density 8,487.9/sq mi (3,276.8/km2)
Time zone Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code 94580
Area code(s) 510
FIPS code 06-68112
GNIS feature IDs 232433, 1659583, 2409260

San Lorenzo (formerly, Lorenzo), also known as San Lorenzo Village is a census-designated place (CDP) in Alameda County, California, United States. The population was 23,452 at the 2010 census.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.8 square miles (7.3 km2), of which, 2.8 square miles (7.3 km2) is land and 0.24% is water. San Lorenzo Creek runs partly through the town. It is located between the incorporated cities of San Leandro to the north and Hayward to the south.

Demographics

2010

The 2010 United States Census6 reported that 23,452 people, 7,425 households, and 5,792 families resided in the CDP. The population density was 8,487.9 people per square mile (3,276.8/km²). There were 7,674 housing units at an average density of 2,770.4 per square mile (1,069.7/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 47.4% White (32.4% non-Hispanic), 4.8% African American (4.5% non-Hispanic), 1.0% Native American, 21.6% Asian, 0.8% Pacific Islander, 17.9% from other races, and 6.5% from two or more races. 37.7% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.

The Census reported that 99.7% of the population lived in households and 0.3% lived in non-institutionalized group quarters.

There were 7,425 households out of which 40.0% had children under the age of 18 living in them, 56.7% were opposite-sex married couples living together, 14.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 6.6% had a male householder with no wife present. 5.1% of households were unmarried opposite-sex partnerships and 0.7% were same-sex married couples or partnerships. 17.3% of households were made up of individuals and 9.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.15 and the average family size was 3.54.

The population was spread out with 24.2% under the age of 18, 9.4% aged 18 to 24, 26.9% aged 25 to 44, 26.8% aged 45 to 64, and 12.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37.9 years. For every 100 females there were 95.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.9 males.

There were 7,674 housing units of which 75.0% were owner-occupied and 25.0% were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 1.1%; the rental vacancy rate was 4.1%. 73.0% of the population lived in owner-occupied housing units and 26.7% lived in rental housing units.

2000

As of the census7 of 2000, there were 21,898 people, 7,500 households, and 5,677 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 7,893.4 people per square mile (3,052.3/km²). There were 7,609 housing units at an average density of 2,742.7 per square mile (1,060.6/km²).

There were 7,500 households, out of which 34.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.1% were married couples living together, 12.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.3% were non-families. 19.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.92 and the average family size was 3.34.

In the CDP the population was spread out with 25.2% under the age of 18, 8.0% from 18 to 24, 29.5% from 25 to 44, 21.3% from 45 to 64, and 16.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 94.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.3 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $66,170, and the median income for a family was $71,787. Males had a median income of $53,626 versus $39,531 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $21,922. About 3.7% of families and 5.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.4% of those under age 18 and 4.2% of those age 65 or over.

Government

San Lorenzo is an unincorporated community and thus is governed directly by the County of Alameda. The area is policed by the Alameda County Sheriff's Office.

History

San Lorenzo, California. Fruit and vegetable stand on highway operated by Filipino.

San Lorenzo is located on the route of El Camino Viejo on land of the former Rancho San Lorenzo a Mexican land grant given to Guillermo Castro in 1841, and the former Rancho San Leandro, granted to José Joaquin Estudillo in 1842.8

Early residents during the California Gold Rush era lived here as squatters along the border between Rancho San Lorenzo and Rancho San Leandro.9 The informal name given to the area was Squatterville.10

The first post office opened in San Lorenzo in 1854.11

Many of the early inhabitants have been laid to rest in San Lorenzo Pioneer Cemetery, including Moses Wicks, who brought oysters to San Leandro Bay (by boat around the cape) from Patchogue, Long Island.citation needed. The cemetery is maintained by the county and the Hayward Area Historical Society.

San Lorenzo was mostly farmland, a significant center of production of fruit and flowers, from the mid-19th century to the mid-20th century.

In 1944, under contract to the U.S. Navy, David D. Bohannon's Greenwood Company began construction of San Lorenzo Village, a tract of two- and three-bedroom homes for workers in the East Bay's war industries. San Lorenzo Village was one of the nation's first planned communities, with parcels designated for schools, churches, parks, and several retail centers. Bohannon's pioneering pre-cutting techniques, referred to as the "California method," were used in later developments, such as the more famous Levittown, Pennsylvania. Home construction continued into the 1950s to accommodate the region's booming population.

Public education

San Lorenzo is served by the San Lorenzo Unified School District, established in 1865.

References

  1. ^ "Senators". State of California. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Members Assembly". State of California. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  3. ^ "California's 15th Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. Retrieved March 13, 2013. 
  4. ^ U.S. Census
  5. ^ "San Lorenzo". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. 
  6. ^ All data are derived from the United States Census Bureau reports from the 2010 United States Census, and are accessible on-line here. The data on unmarried partnerships and same-sex married couples are from the Census report DEC_10_SF1_PCT15. All other housing and population data are from Census report DEC_10_DP_DPDP1. Both reports are viewable online or downloadable in a zip file containing a comma-delimited data file. The area data, from which densities are calculated, are available on-line here. Percentage totals may not add to 100% due to rounding. The Census Bureau defines families as a household containing one or more people related to the householder by birth, opposite-sex marriage, or adoption. People living in group quarters are tabulated by the Census Bureau as neither owners nor renters. For further details, see the text files accompanying the data files containing the Census reports mentioned above.
  7. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  8. ^ Ogden Hoffman, 1862, Reports of Land Cases Determined in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California, Numa Hubert, San Francisco
  9. ^ [1]
  10. ^ [2]
  11. ^ Durham, David L. (1998). California's Geographic Names: A Gazetteer of Historic and Modern Names of the State. Quill Driver Books. p. 696. ISBN 9781884995149. 

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