Talk:Fat

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Whats up with these unit conversions? They're off by 1000 fold.

"Fat is one of the three main classes of food and, at approximately 38 kJ (9 Cal) per gram, as compared to sugar with 17 kJ (4 Cal) per gram or ethanol with 29 kJ (7 Cal) per gram, the most concentrated form of metabolic energy available to humans."

Cal = calorie correct? and KJ = kilojoule correct?

If so those calorie numbers are missing a 1000x multiplier.

Google for "convert 38 kilojoule to calorie":

38 kiloJoule = 9 082.21797 calorie


Just different calories. Hardly anybody uses those dinky gram calories or small calories any more. Gene Nygaard 18:55, 20 August 2005 (UTC)

Just put a dam k in front so you get kcal kilo calories. If you wan't to use SI units please do it right and use the correct unit conversions. One calorie is the energi requierd to heat one gram of water one degree celsius. One kcal is therfore the energy requierd to heat one thousand grams, one kilogram or on litre of water one degree celsius (or Kelvin, suit yourself). From wikipedias own calorie article:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calorie

A calorie is a unit of measurement for energy. Calorie is French and derives from the Latin calor (heat). In most fields, it has been replaced by the joule, the SI unit of energy. However, it remains in common use for the amount of food energy.

Definitions for calorie fall into 2 classes: The small calorie or gram calorie approximates the energy needed to increase the temperature of 1 gram of water by 1 °C. This is about 4.184 Joules, and exactly 0.001 large calories. The large calorie or kilogram calorie approximates the energy needed to increase the temperature of 1 kg of water by 1 °C. This is about 4.184 kJ, and exactly 1000 small calories

130.243.153.103 22:34, 18 May 2007 (UTC)
Generally, the distinction is made by the case of the letter c. Calorie = kCal. --Belg4mit (talk) 04:33, 24 August 2008 (UTC)

mention the controversy

"Diet and Fat: A Severe Case of Mistaken Consensus" by JOHN TIERNEY 2007 (New York Times)
"... Gary Taubes ... book meticulously debunking diet myths, “Good Calories, Bad Calories” (Knopf, 2007). The notion that fatty foods shorten your life began as a hypothesis based on dubious assumptions and data; when scientists tried to confirm it they failed repeatedly. The evidence against Häagen-Dazs was nothing like the evidence against Marlboros."
"If the second person isn’t sure of the answer, he’s liable to go along with the first person’s guess. ... Thus begins an “informational cascade” as one person after another assumes that the rest can’t all be wrong."

I think the article should at least mention the controversy, even if the rest of the article clearly shows that one side (or the other) is wrong.

--75.19.73.101 21:29, 24 October 2007 (UTC)

Calories?

I was surprised that there is no mention of calories, e.g. how many calories are in a gram of fat, how many calories one has to burn to lose a pound of fat, etc. --Tmusgrove (talk) 18:52, 27 January 2008 (UTC)

add it yourself then.. it's roughly 9 calories per gram of fat and that figures to about 3500 calories in a pound of fat —Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.179.151.70 (talk) 05:08, 6 July 2008 (UTC)

Please indicate...

I couldn't see here the reason why fat gives more energy that either carbohydrate or protein. Put it, please... -Pika ten10 (talk) 11:45, 3 July 2008 (UTC)

Seems obvious to me it should be because carbohydrates and proteins are already partially oxidized. Although, if you really wanted to, you could work out the energetics yourself; have fun with that. --Belg4mit (talk) 04:37, 24 August 2008 (UTC)

Fats give 9 cals per gram, sugars and amino acids 5 cals per gram. The difference is due to the fact that catabolism of fatty acid liberates more high energy phosphate bonds than does the others.Historygypsy (talk)` —Preceding undated comment added 13:59, 12 January 2010 (UTC).

"Chemically, fats are generally triesters of glycerol and fatty acids."

As opposed to? --Belg4mit (talk) 04:34, 24 August 2008 (UTC)

As opposed to other organic tissues, (i.e. fibrous connective tissue, bone, etc.) In short, fatty acids and triesters of glycerol are the chemical strucutre of fats.--Metalhead94 (talk) 22:47, 11 September 2008 (UTC)

No mention or link of health issues regarding fat in diet

A topic of major importance I would have thought. I came here wanting to find out the upper and lower recommendations for fat consumption, but not mentioned. The article (or a new linked article) could discuss the various types of fat also. Apparantlty there are many different types of fat, not just a few. 78.146.75.5 (talk) 15:41, 18 February 2009 (UTC)

dieting i think shall be entered into this section??? about FAT ????

Dieting is the practice of ingesting food in a regulated fashion to achieve or maintain a controlled weight. In most cases the goal is weight loss in those who are overweight or obese, but some athletes aspire to gain weight (usually in the form of muscle) and diets can also be used to maintain a stable body weight.

Diets to promote weight loss are generally divided into four categories: low-fat, low-carbohydrate, low-calorie, and very low calorie.[1] A meta-analysis of six randomized controlled trials found no difference between the main diet types (low calorie, low carbohydrate, and low fat), with a 2–4 kilogram weight loss in all studies.[1] At two years all diet types cause equal weight loss irrespective of the macronutrients emphasized.[2] —Preceding unsigned comment added by 78.143.200.221 (talk) 09:13, 17 April 2009 (UTC)

Defining Fats

Fats are only found in animals, not in plants. Fats are Cholesterol, Triglyceride and some specialized compounds found only in neurologic tissue.

Lipids is a name that covers all fats plus plant oils and other non water soluble compounds such as fatty acids.

Historygypsy (talk) 13:56, 12 January 2010 (UTC) lecturer organic chemistry (retired)

Huh? What about olive oil, sunflower oil, rapeseed/canola oil, walnut oil, grapeseed oil, palm oil? All commonly referred to as fats. 92.24.182.48 (talk) 16:29, 5 June 2010 (UTC)

Edit request

{{editsemiprotected}}

Attention Moderator: Please append fat article with sub heading "Human Health And Diet" to closely reiterate contents below, sourced from http://lowfatcooking.about.com/od/lowfatbasics/a/fats1004.htm

I have removed the material directly copy-pasted. This is a copyright violation, and should not be posted here. To submit a change, please rewrite the desired material in your own words exactly as you want it to appear.  fetchcomms 03:51, 14 March 2010 (UTC)

Why nothing about the health dangers of over-consumption?

Particularly for saturated fat, fried foods, and so on? 92.15.3.53 (talk) 10:20, 5 June 2010 (UTC)

Edit request from Jm5104, 10 December 2010

{{edit semi-protected}} Hello Chubby...

Jm5104 (talk) 00:55, 10 December 2010 (UTC)

Not done: please be more specific about what needs to be changed. Usb10 Connected? 01:23, 10 December 2010 (UTC)

Edit request

Could we make the substances listed in the list of edible plant and animal fats be linked? i.e. "peanuts" instead of "peanuts." It would greatly help me. Thanks.


Edit request

There is a wrongly constructed sentence. Under Saturated and unsaturated fats, there is the sentence: In unsaturated fats are derived from fatty acids with the formula CnH(2n-1)CO2H. "In unsaturated fats" is a phrase, leaving the verb "are derived" with no subject. I suppose the word "In" should be removed, but these are highly technical articles with no general Edit buttons in them, so I've left the editing to someone in the specialist community that normally deals with editing such articles. Ynotna (talk) 23:06, 20 February 2012 (UTC)

Edit request on 6 August 2013

Text bellow the second image under "Chemical structure":

-All carbon-carbon double bonds have are cis isomers.

+All carbon-carbon double bonds are cis isomers.

Torkel Bjørnson-Langen (talk) 03:18, 6 August 2013 (UTC)

Done RudolfRed (talk) 03:56, 6 August 2013 (UTC)







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