Timeline of women's rights (other than voting)

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Laura Bassi. The first female professor in Europe
Dorothea Erxleben. The first female doctor in Germany
Portrait of Elizabeth Blackwell by Joseph Stanley Kozlowski, 1905. Syracuse University Medical School collection.

The timeline signifies the major events in the development of women's rights and issues of gender inequality other than the right to vote. For those rights see Timeline of women's suffrage.

Before the 19th century

1718
  • Russia: Gender segregation is banned1
  • Sweden: Female taxpaying members of the cities' guilds are allowed to vote and stand for election during the age of liberty; this right is banned (for local elections) in 1758 and (general elections) in 17712
  • Province of Pennsylvania (now U.S. state of Pennsylvania): Married women allowed to own and manage property in their own name during the incapacity of their spouse3
1722
  • Russia: Ban against forced marriages 1
1753
  • Russia: Married women granted separate economy 4
1754
1771
  • New York: Husbands must have their wives' consent to sell their property5
1774
  • Maryland: Husbands must have their wives' consent to sell their property5
1776
1778
  • Sweden: Barnamordsplakatet; unmarried women are allowed to leave their home town to give birth anonymously and have the birth registered anonymously, to refrain from answering any questions about the birth and, if they choose to keep their child, to have their unmarried status not mentioned in official documents to avoid social embarrassment.
1779
  • Spain: The guild restrictions which prevented females from holding certain professions are abolished.7
1784
  • Spain: Women are by royal decree allowed to accept any profession compatible with her "sex, dignity and strength".7
1786
  • Russia: Primary and high schools for females 1
1787
  • Massachusetts: The trade profession is opened to unmarried women5
1788
  • France: noble widows are known to have voted to the French States-General in 1788–89 in the absence of a male guardian.
  • United States of America: Female citizens may stand for election for federal offices, though they still could not vote.
1789
  • France is the first country in Europe where it is suggested that women are to be in the Assembly of the Estates, there are several demands to include women in the reforms of the right to vote.
1791
  • France: Equal inheritance rights (abolished in 1804) 8
1792
  • France: Divorce is legalized for both sexes8 (abolished for women in 1804)
  • France: Local women-units of the defense army are founded in several cities; although the military was never officially open to women, about eight thousand women were estimated to have served openly in the French armé in local troops (but not in the battle fields) between 1792 and 1794, but women were officially barred from the armé in 17959
1793
  • France: The question of women's right to vote is discussed in the Parliament of France; women's right to vote is acknowledged as a principle, but it is still put aside with the explanation that the time is not right to make this a reality and is therefore postponed.9

19th century

1800–1860

1809
  • USA, Connecticut: Married women are allowed to execute wills5
1810
  • Sweden: The informal right of an unmarried woman to be declared of legal majority by royal dispensation are officially confirmed by parliament10
1811
  • Austria: Married women are granted separate economy and the right to choose profession11
  • Sweden: Married businesswomen are granted the right to make decisions about their own affairs without their husband's consent 12
1821
  • USA, Maine: Married women allowed to own and manage property in their own name during the incapacity of their spouse3
1827
  • Brazil: The first elementary schools for girls and the profession of school teacher are open13
1829
  • India: Sati is banned.
  • Sweden: Midwives are allowed to use surgical instruments, which are unique in Europe at the time and gives them surgical status14
1833
1835
  • USA, Arkansas: Married women allowed to own (but not control) property in their own name3
  • USA, Massachusetts: Married women allowed to own and manage property in their own name during the incapacity of their spouse3
  • USA, Tennessee: Married women allowed to own and manage property in their own name during the incapacity of their spouse3
1839
1840
  • USA, Texas: Married women allowed to own property in their own name17
  • USA, Maine: Married women allowed to own (but not control) property in their own name3
1841
  • Bulgaria: The first secular girls school makes education and the profession of teacher available for women18
  • USA, Maryland: Married women allowed to own (but not control) property in their own name.3
1842
  • Sweden: Compulsory Elementary school for both sexes 19
  • USA, New Hampshire: Married women allowed to own and manage property in their own name during the incapacity of their spouse3
1843
  • USA, Kentucky: Married women allowed to own and manage property in their own name during the incapacity of their spouse3
1844
  • USA, Maine: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, Maine: Married women granted trade license3
  • USA, Massachusetts: Married Women granted separate economy 20
1845
  • Sweden: Equal inheritance for sons and daughters (in the absence of a will)21
  • USA, New York: Married women granted patent rights3
  • USA, Florida: Married women allowed to own (but not control) property in their own name3
1846
  • Sweden: Trade- and crafts works professions are opened to all unmarried women22
  • USA, Alabama: Married women allowed to own (but not control) property in their own name3
  • USA, Kentucky: Married women allowed to own (but not control) property in their own name3
  • USA, Ohio: Married women allowed to own (but not control) property in their own name3
  • USA, Michigan: Married women allowed to own and manage property in their own name during the incapacity of their spouse3
1847
  • Belgium: Elementary school for both genders
  • Costa Rica: The first high school for girls, and the profession of teacher is open to women23
1848
  • USA, State of New York: Married Women's Property Act grant married women separate economy24
  • USA, Pennsylvania: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, Rhode Island: Married women granted separate economy3
1849
  • USA, Alabama: Married women allowed to own and manage property in their own name during the incapacity of their spouse3
  • USA, Connecticut: Married women allowed to own and manage property in their own name during the incapacity of their spouse3
  • USA: Elizabeth Blackwell becomes the first female medical doctor (1858 also in Great Britain).
  • USA, Missouri: Married women allowed to own (but not control) property in their own name3
  • USA, South Carolina: Married women allowed to own (but not control) property in their own name3
1850
  • France: Elementary education for both sexes, but girls are only allowed to be tutored by teachers from the church11
  • Haiti: The first permanent school for girls25
  • Iceland: Equal inheritance.26
  • USA, California: Married Women's Property Act grant married women separate economy27
  • USA, Wisconsin: Married Women's Property Act grant married women separate economy27
  • USA, Oregon: Unmarried women are allowed to own land11
1851
  • Guatemala: Full citizenship are granted economically independent women (rescinded in 1879)28
  • Canada, New Brunswick : Married women granted separate economy29
1852
  • USA, New Jersey: Married Women granted separate economy 20
  • USA, Indiana: Married women allowed to own (but not control) property in their own name3
  • USA, Wisconsin: Married women allowed to own and manage property in their own name during the incapacity of their spouse3
1853
  • Colombia: Divorce is legalized (rescinded in 1856 and reintroduced in 1992) 15
  • Sweden: The profession of teacher at public primary and elementary schools are opened to both sexes30
1854
  • Norway: Equal inheritance11
  • USA, Massachusetts: grant married women separate economy27
  • Chile: The first public elementary school for girls31
1855
  • Ottoman Empire: Factory work are open to both sexes when the first women are employed at the textile factory at Bursa, at the same time allowing them to mix unveiled with men.32
  • USA, Iowa: University of Iowa becomes the first coeducational public or state university in the United States33
  • USA, Michigan: Married women granted separate economy18
1856
  • USA, Connecticut: Married women granted patent rights3
1857
  • Denmark: Legal majority for unmarried women11
  • Denmark: Trade- and crafts professions are opened to unmarried women34
  • Great Britain: Matrimonial Causes Act 1857 makes divorce possible for both sexes.
  • Netherlands: Elementary education compulsory for both girls and boys 35
  • Spain: Elementary education compulsory for both girls and boys 36
  • USA, Maine: Married women granted the right to control their own earnings 20
  • USA, Oregon: Married women allowed to own (but not control) property in their own name3
  • USA, Oregon: Married women allowed to own and manage property in their own name during the incapacity of their spouse3
1858
  • Ottoman Empire: The first state school for girls is opened; several others schools for girls are opened during the following decades.37
  • Russia: gymnasiums for girls1
  • Sweden: Legal majority for unmarried women (if applied for; automatic legal majority in 1863)21
1859
  • Canada West: Married women granted separate economy 29
  • Denmark: The post of teacher at public schools are opened to women34
  • Russia: Women allowed to audit university lectures (retracted in 1863)1
  • Sweden: The post of college teacher and lower official at public institutions are open to women 38
  • USA, Kansas: Married Women's Property Act grant married women separate economy 27

1860–1899

1860
  • USA, New York: Married women granted the right to control their own earnings20
  • USA, Maryland: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, Maryland: Married women granted the right to control their earnings3
  • USA, Maryland: Married women granted trade license3
  • New Zealand: Married women allowed to own property (extended in 1870)11
  • USA, Massachusetts: Married women granted trade licenses3
1861
  • France: Julie-Victoire Daubié becomes the first female student.
  • Iceland: Legal majority for unmarried women26
  • Russia: The Scientific- and Medical Surgery Academy open laboratories for women (retracted in 1864)1
  • Sweden: The first public institution of higher academic learning for women, Högre lärarinneseminariet, is opened.
  • Sweden: The dentist profession is opened to women39
  • USA: Lucy Hobbs Taylor becomes the first female dentist.
  • USA, Illinois: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, Ohio: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, Illinois: Married women granted control over their earnings3
  • USA, Ohio: Married women granted control over their earnings3
1863
  • Denmark: Colleges open to women22
  • Norway: Legal majority for unmarried women (at the same age as men in 1869)21
  • Sweden: The Post- and telegraph professions are opened to women 40
1864
  • Bohemia: Taxpaying women and women in "learned profession" eligible to the legislative body41
  • Finland: Legal majority for unmarried women.21
  • Haiti: Elementary schools for girls are founded25
  • Sweden: Unmarried women are granted the same rights within trade and commerce as men12
  • Sweden: Husbands are forbidden to abuse their wives.42
  • Sweden: The gymnastics profession is open to women 40
1865
  • Ireland: Married Women's Property (Ireland) Act 1865
  • Italy: Legal majority for unmarried women43
  • Italy: Equal inheritance43
  • Italy: A married woman is allowed to become the legal guardian of her children and their property if abandoned by her husband43
  • Romania: The educational reform grant all Romanians access to education, which, at least formally, gave also females the right to attend school from elementary education to the university.44
  • USA, Louisiana: Married women allowed to own and manage property in their own name during the incapacity of their spouse3
1867
  • Switzerland: Zürich University formally open to women, though they had already been allowed to attend lectures a few years prior45
  • USA, Alabama: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, New Hampshire: Married women granted separate economy3
1868
  • Croatia: The first high school open to females46
  • USA, North Carolina: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, Arkansas: Married women granted trade license3
  • USA, Kansas: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, Kansas: Married women granted trade license3
  • USA, Kansas: Married women granted control over their earnings3
  • USA, South Carolina: Married women allowed to own (but not control) property in their own name3
  • USA, Georgia: Married women allowed to own (but not control) property in their own name3
1869
  • Austria-Hungary: The profession of public school teacher is open to women11
  • Costa Rica: Elementary education compulsory for both girls and boys23
  • Great Britain: Girton College, Cambridge.
  • Ottoman Empire: The law formally introduce compulsory elementary education for both boys and girls.47
  • Russia: University Courses for women are opened, which opens the profession of teacher, law assistant and similar lower academic professions for women (in 1876, the courses are no longer allowed to give exams, and in 1883, all outside of the capital is closed).11
  • Sweden: Women allowed to work in the railway office 40
  • USA: Arabella Mansfield becomes the first woman to enter the practice of law.
  • USA, Minnesota: Married women granted separate economy3
1870
  • Finland: Women allowed to study at the universities by dispensation (dispensation demand dropped in 1901) 48
  • Great Britain: Married Women's Property Act 1870
  • India: Female Infanticide Prevention Act, 1870
  • Mexico: Married women granted separate economy49
  • Ottoman Empire: The Teachers College for Girls are opened in Constantinople to educate women to professional teachers for girls school; the profession of teacher becomes accessible for women and education accessible to girls.50
  • Sweden: Universities open to women (at the same terms as men 1873)21 the first female student is Betty Pettersson.
  • USA, Georgia: Married women granted separate economy 51
  • USA, South Carolina: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, South Carolina: Married women granted trade license3
  • USA, Tennessee: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, Iowa: Married women granted control over their earnings3
1871
  • Japan: Women are allowed to study in the USA (though not yet in Japan itself)52
  • New Zealand: Universities open to women53
  • USA, Mississippi: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, Mississippi: Married women granted trade license3
  • USA, Mississippi: Married women granted control over their earnings3
  • USA, Arizona: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, Arizona: Married women granted trade license3
1872
  • Austria-Hungary: Women allowed to work in the post- and telegraph office11
  • Canada: Dominion Lands Act grant mothers without husbands homestead land.
  • Japan: The geisha as well as the prostituted women are freed from guardianship and granted legal majority and the right to change profession54
  • Japan: Compulsory elementary education for both girls and boys 55
  • Sweden: Women are granted the right to choose marriage partner and arranged marriages are thereby banned (the noblewomen, however, not granted the same right until 1882) 56
  • Switzerland: The universities of Bern and Geneva open to women (Lausanne follow in 1876 and Basel in 1890)45
  • USA, Pennsylvania: Married women granted control over their earnings3
  • USA, California: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, Montana: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, California: Married women granted trade license3
  • USA, California: Married women granted control over their earnings3
  • USA, Wisconsin: Married women granted control over their earnings3
1873
  • Great Britain: Custody of Infants Act 1873; Mothers granted guardianship for children at divorce.
  • USA, Arkansas: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, Kentucky: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, North Carolina: Married women granted control over their earnings3
  • USA, Kentucky: Married women granted trade license3
  • USA, Arkansas: Married women granted control over their earnings3
  • USA, Delaware: Married women granted control over their earnings3
  • USA, Iowa: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, Nevada: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, Iowa: Married women granted trade license3
  • USA, Nevada: Married women granted trade license3
  • USA, Nevada: Married women granted control over their earnings3
1874
  • Netherlands: Aletta Jacobs becomes the first woman allowed to study medicine.
  • Sweden: Married women granted control over their own income21
  • France: First trade union open to women.
  • Japan: The profession of public school teacher is opened to women 57
  • USA, Massachusetts: Married women granted control over their earnings3
  • USA, New Jersey: Married women granted control over their earnings3
  • USA, Rhode Island: Married women granted control over their earnings3
  • USA, New Jersey: Married women granted trade licenses3
  • USA, Colorado: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, Illinois: Married women granted trade license3
  • USA, Minnesota: Married women granted trade license3
  • USA, Montana: Married women granted control over their earnings3
  • USA, Montana: Married women granted trade license3
  • USA, Colorado: Married women granted trade license3
  • USA, Colorado: Married women granted control over their earnings3
1875
  • Denmark: Universities open to women21
  • USA, Delaware: Married women granted separate economy3
1876
  • Great Britain: Universities open to women 58
  • Italy: Universities open to women.59
  • Netherlands:Universities open to women 59
  • USA, New Hampshire: Married women granted trade licenses3
  • USA, Wyoming: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, Wyoming: Married women granted control over their earnings3
  • USA, Wyoming: Married women granted trade license3
1877
  • Chile: Universities open to women 60
  • Italy: Women can serve as witnesses to legal acts43
  • Scotland: Married Women's Property (Scotland) Act 1877.
  • USA, Connecticut: Married women granted control over their earnings3
  • USA, Connecticut: Married women granted trade licenses3
  • USA, Dakota: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, Dakota: Married women granted control over their earnings3
  • USA, Dakota: Married women granted trade license3
1878
  • Austria-Hungary: Women allowed to attend university lectures as guest auditors 61
  • Bulgaria: Elementary education for both sexes62
  • Finland: Equal inheritance21
  • Great Britain: Women can secure a separation on the grounds of cruelty, claim custody of their children and demand spousal and child support. Abused wives granted separation orders63
  • Great Britain: Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford
  • USA, Virginia: Married women granted separate economy3
1879
  • Brazil: Universities open to women13
  • France: Colleges and secondary education open to women11
  • India: The first college open to women, Bethune College.
  • USA, Indiana: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, Indiana: Married women granted control over their earnings3
1880
  • Australia : Universities open to women 64
  • Belgium: The university of Brussels open to women59
  • Canada: Universities open to women.citation needed
  • Denmark: Married women granted the right to control their own income65
  • France: Universities open to women11
  • USA, Oregon: Married women granted trade license3
  • USA, Oregon: Married women granted control over their earnings3
1881
  • France: Women allowed to open a bank account in their own name11
  • Scotland: Married Women's Property (Scotland) Act 1881
  • USA, Vermont: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, Vermont: Married women granted trade license3
  • USA, Nebraska: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, Nebraska: Married women granted trade license3
  • USA, Nebraska: Married women granted control over their earnings3
  • USA, Florida: Married women allowed to own and manage property in their own name during the incapacity of their spouse3
1882
  • Great Britain: Married Women's Property Act 1882
  • France: Compulsory elementary school for both genders 66
  • Nicaragua: The first public secular education institution for women, Colegio de Senoritas, open67
  • Poland: The Flying University provides academic education for women.
1883
  • Belgium: Universities open to women 59
  • Romania: Universities open to women 68
  • Victoria, Australia: Married women granted separate economy 64
1884
  • Switzerland: Legal majority for unmarried women (including widows) 69
  • Norway: Universities open to women21
  • Germany: Legal majority for unmarried women11
  • Mexico: Legal majority for unmarried women and separate economy granted for married women 70
  • Ontario: Married women granted separate economy 71
  • Great Britain: Married Women's Property Act 1884
1885
  • France: Divorce legalized for both women and men 11
1886
  • Costa Rica: A public academic educational institution open to women23
  • France: Married allowed to open a bank account without the consent of her husband72
  • France: Women eligible to education boards73
  • Great Britain: Guardianship of Infants Act 1886
  • Great Britain: Josephine Butler puts a stop to the prostitution reglement.
  • Guatemala: Married women granted separate economy49
  • Korea: The first educational institution for women, Ewha Womans University
1887
  • Costa Rica: Legal majority for married women49
  • Costa Rica: Married women granted separate economy49
  • Mexico: Universities open to women 74
  • USA, Idaho: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, Idaho: Married women granted trade license3
1888
  • Costa Rica: Married women are allowed to be guardians and execute wills23
  • Denmark: Fathers are forced to pay support to illegitimate children65
  • Serbia: Universities open to women48
  • Spain: Women are allowed to private university degrees by dispensation (Universities fully open to women in 1910) 75
  • Norway: Legal majority for married women26
  • Montenegro: Legal majority for unmarried women 46
1889
  • Sweden: Women eligible to boards of public authority such as public school boards, public hospital boards, inspectors, poor care boards and similar positions21
  • USA, State of Washington: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, State of Washington: Married women granted control over their earnings3
  • USA, State of Washington: Married women granted trade license3
1890
1891
  • Germany: Women are allowed to attend university lectures, which makes it possible for individual professors to accept female students if they wish61
  • Portugal: The first medical university degree is granted to a woman 76
  • Switzerland: Secondary schools open to women45
  • Switzerland: Trade unions open to women35
  • USA: Marie Owens hired as a police officer in Chicago.
1893
  • France: Legal majority for unmarried and separated women 72
  • Great Britain: Married Women's Property Act 1893 grants married women control of property acquired during marriage.
1894
  • Poland: Kraków University open to women 77
  • USA, Louisiana: Married women granted trade license3
1895
  • South Carolina in the United States: Separate economy allowed for married women.
  • Upper Canada: Women allowed to work as barristers.citation needed
  • Russia: A Women's medical university are opened, which opens the profession of physician for women11
  • Austria-Hungary : Universities open to women11
  • USA, Utah: Married women granted separate economy3
  • USA, State of Washington: Married women granted control over their earnings3
  • USA, State of Washington: Married women granted trade license3
1896
  • USA : The profession of lawyer opened to both sexes – already in 1869, however, the first American state allowed women to practice law.
1897
  • France: Both married and unmarried women allowed to act as witness in a civil court and are thereby acknowledged as an individual in a juridical sense
1898
  • France: Women eligible to public charity boards78
  • Haiti: The Medical University accept female students in obstetrics25
1899
  • Denmark: Legal majority for married women65
  • Iceland: Legal majority for married women.11

20th century

1900–1939

1900
  • Belgium: Legal majority for unmarried women79
  • Egypt: A school for female teachers is founded in Cairo 80
  • France: Women allowed to practice law78
  • Korea: The post office profession is open to women and thereby open the public work market for women 81
  • Tunisia: The first public elementary school for girls80
  • Japan: The first Women's University 82
  • Baden, Germany: Universities open to women83
  • Sweden: Maternity leave for female industrial workers22
1901
  • Bulgaria: Universities open to women62
  • Cuba: Universities open to women 74
  • Denmark: Maternity leave for all women65
  • Sweden: Women are given four weeks maternity leave.42
1902
  • China: Foot binding is abolished.
  • El Salvador: Married women granted separate economy49
  • El Salvador: Legal majority for married women49
1903
  • Bavaria, Germany: Universities open to women83
  • Sweden: Public medical offices open to women84
1904
  • Mexico: Divorce is legalized.
  • Nicaragua: Married women granted separate economy49
  • Nicaragua: Legal majority for married women49
  • Württemberg, Germany: Universities open to women83
1905
  • Iceland: Educational institutions open to women11
  • Russia: Universities open to women11
1906
  • Finland (to stand for election).
  • Honduras: Married women granted separate economy49
  • Honduras: Legal majority for married women49
  • Honduras: Divorce is legalized 15
  • Korea: The profession of nurse is allowed for women81
  • Nicaragua: Divorce is legalized 15
  • Sweden : Municipal suffrage, since 1862 granted to unmarried women, granted to married women 85
  • Saxony, Germany: Universities open to women83
1907
  • France: Married women given control of their income 86
  • France: Women allowed guardianship of children78
  • Great Britain: Matrimonial Causes Act 1907
  • Japan: Tohoku University, the first (private) coeducational university.
  • Norway (to stand for election).
  • Finland (first female Members of Parliament).
  • Uruguay: Divorce is legalized 87
1908
  • Belgium: Women may act as legal witnesses in court11
  • Denmark: Juridical professions of lower rank open to women34
  • Denmark: Unmarried women are made legal guardian of their children65
  • Ottoman Empire: The Young Turks introduce several reform in favor of gender equality: the professions of doctor, lawyer, and civil servant as well as public places such as restaurants, theatres and lecture halls open to both genders.88
  • Peru: Universities open to women89
  • Prussia, Alsace-Lorraine and Hesse, Germany: Universities open to women83
1909
  • Sweden: Women granted eligibility to municipal councils 85
  • Sweden: The phrase "Swedish man" are removed from the application forms to public offices and women are thereby approved as applicants to most public professions84
  • Mecklenburg, Germany: Universities open to women83
1910
1911
  • Portugal: Civil offices open to women76
  • Portugal: Legal majority for married women 76 (rescinded in 1933)90
  • Portugal: Divorce legalized90
1913
  • Japan: Public universities open to women57
  • Portugal: The first university law degree is granted to a woman76
1914
  • Russia: Married women allowed their own internal passport1
1917
  • Cuba: Married women granted separate economy49
  • Cuba: Legal majority for married women49
  • Netherlands (to stand for election)
  • Mexico: Legal majority for married women49
  • Mexico: Divorce legalized49
1918
  • Cuba: Divorce is legalized 15
  • Nicaragua: The first female obtains a university degree67
  • Soviet Russia: The first Soviet Constitution explicitly declares the equal rights of men and women.
  • Thailand: Universities open to women 91
1919
1920
  • China: The first female students are accepted in the Peking University, soon followed by universities all over China.92
  • Canada (to stand for election, with some restrictions/conditions).
  • Haiti: The apothecary profession open to women25
  • Korea: The profession of telephone operator, as well as several other professions, such as store clerks, are open to women81
  • Portugal: Secondary school open to women76
  • Sweden: Legal majority for married women and equal marriage rights21
1921
  • Belgium (to stand for election).
  • Belgium: The position of mayor, several lower public offices, such as financial adviser, open to women at local level79
  • Thailand: Compulsory elementary education for both girls and boys 91
1922
  • Belgium: The profession of lawyer is open to women11
  • Japan: Women are allowed to be present and political meetings and form political organizations 93
1924
  • Denmark: The first ever female minister in Western Europe is appointed, when Nina Bang is appointed Minister of Education by Thorvald Stauning.
1925
1926
  • Argentina: Married women granted separate economy49
  • Turkey: Women are granted legal majority, are admitted to the universities, and the harems and the veil are abolished.
1927
  • Mexico: Legal majority for married women 15
1928
  • Mexico: Equal marriage law49
1929
  • Haiti: The lawyer profession open to women25
1930
  • Peru: Divorce is legalized 15
1931
  • China: The new Civil Code grant equal inheritance rights, the right for women to choose marriage partner, equal right to divorce and right to control their own property after divorce31
  • Spain: Legal majority for married women (rescinded in 1939)94
  • Spain: Equal right to profession (rescinded in 1939)94
  • Spain: Divorce is legalized(rescinded in 1939)94
1932
  • Bolivia: Divorce is legalized 15
  • Colombia: Legal majority for married women49
  • Colombia: Married women granted separate economy49
  • Romania: Married women granted legal majority.95
1933
  • Colombia: Universities open to women 96
1934
  • Haiti: The physician profession open to women25
  • Turkey (to stand for election)
1935
  • Iran: Women are admitted to Tehran University97
1936
  • Colombia: The national University open to women 98
  • Iran: Reza Shah Pahlavi set the mandatory unveiling of women—a highly controversial policy which nonetheless was significant for the desegregation of women97
  • Peru: Married women granted separate economy49
1937
1938
1939
  • Sweden: Ban against firing a woman for marrying or having children.42

1940–1999

1942
  • Russia: Women formally accepted into the military1
  • Venezuela: Legal majority for married women49
  • Venezuela: Married women granted separate economy49
1945
  • 'British Guiana'-Guyana (to stand for election)
1946
  • Burma: Myanmar (to stand for election)
  • Uruguay: Legal majority for married women49
  • Uruguay: Married women granted separate economy49
1947
  • Sweden: Equal salary for both sexes.42
1948
  • Sweden: Maternity pay.42
1949
  • Ecuador: Legal majority for married women49
1950
  • China: Statute grants women equal right to property, to seek divorce and to inheritance.
1953
  • Mexico (to stand for election)
1958
  • Sweden: Women allowed to become priests21
1960
  • Canada (to stand for election, with no restrictions/conditions)
1961
  • El Salvador (to stand for election)
1962
  • Brazil: Legal majority for married women99
1963
  • Guatemala: Legal majority for married women49
  • Papua New Guinea (to stand for election)
1968
  • Argentina: Legal majority for married women49
1969
  • Portugal: Legal majority for married women90
1970
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo (to stand for election)
  • Ecuador: Married women granted separate economy49
1971
  • Switzerland: Women allowed to elect and vote at federal level100
  • USA: Barring women from practicing law was prohibited in the U.S. in 1971.101
1972
  • Bolivia: Married women granted separate economy49
  • Bolivia: Legal majority for married women49
1973
  • Andorra, San Marino (to stand for election)
  • USA: Roe v. Wade, right to abortion secured
1975
1978
  • 'Rhodesia'-Zimbabwe (to stand for election)
1979
  • Chile: Legal majority for married women49
1980
  • Sweden: Gender discrimination forbidden by law.42
1984
  • Peru: Legal majority for married women49
1986
  • Djibouti (to stand for election)
1991

21st century

2002
2007

See also

References

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