UFCU Disch–Falk Field

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UFCU Disch-Falk Field
"The Disch"
Disch falk field 2008.jpg
Location Austin, Texas
Opened February 17, 1975
Closed Open
Demolished N/A
Owner University of Texas
Operator University of Texas
Surface AstroTurf 1975 to 2007
FieldTurf 2008 to present
Construction cost $21MM (2008 Renovation)
Architect DLR Group (2008 Renovation)
Capacity 6,756
Field dimensions Left field - 340 ft (103.5 m)
Center field - 400 ft (122 m)
Right field - 325 ft (99 m)
Tenants
Texas Longhorns (NCAA) (1975-present)

UFCU Disch–Falk Field is the baseball stadium of the University of Texas at Austin. It's been home to Texas Longhorns baseball since it opened February 17, 1975. On that day, the eventual NCAA national champion Longhorns swept a doubleheader from St. Mary's by scores of 4-0 and 11-0. It replaced Clark Field as the home of the Longhorns.

The stadium is named for former Longhorns coaches Billy Disch and Bibb Falk. Beginning August 1, 2006, the name of the stadium was changed to UFCU Disch–Falk Field, following a sponsorship deal with a local credit union, University Federal Credit Union.

Stadium Facts

  • Geographic coordinates: 30.280°N 97.726°W.
  • Capacity: The facility seats more than 6,500 spectators, with chairbacks on more than 5,000 seats and covered seating throughout most of the stands.
  • Surface: The entire playing surface, excluding the pitcher's mound, is FieldTurf installed in 2008.
  • Field dimensions: 340 feet down the left field line, 325 down the right field line and 400 to center field.

Attendance

In 2013, the Longhorns ranked 6th among Division I baseball programs in attendance, averaging 5,793 per home game.1

In 2012, college baseball writer Eric Sorenson ranked the stadium as the fifth best big game atmosphere in Division I baseball.2

Changes to Disch-Falk

Renovation

The new exterior facade after completion of the renovation.

In July 2005, the University announced an $18 million renovation project for Disch-Falk Field. Construction began in late 2006. The Longhorns played their 2007 season at the stadium during the renovation, although a few early season games and the NCAA Regional Tournament were moved to the nearby Dell Diamond. Completed for the 2008 season, the renovated Disch-Falk field was designed by architectural firm DLR Group. The renovations included:

  • 107 premium seats added increasing capacity to 6,756
  • 17 new suites
  • lowering of the seating bowl six feet to field level
  • complete replacement of the seating bowl
  • expanded concourse
  • new team merchandise store
  • new full-service ticket office
  • expanded concessions and restrooms
  • enhanced media services spaces
  • new lighting and sound systems
  • dugouts moved closer to the field
  • new bullpens
  • new weight training facility
  • new team training areas
  • new team meeting room
  • new coaches offices
  • replacement of AstroTurf surface with FieldTurf. [1] 3

Scoreboard

During the 2005 season, the scoreboard in left-center field, which was installed in 1989 and upgraded in 1996, was completely dismantled. A new scoreboard with a full-color video screen was erected in its place.

Naming

October 12, 2005, the University announced a $13.1 million gift from University Federal Credit Union as the major gift in the campaign to finance the renovation of the ballpark. In connection with this gift, the name of the stadium changed to UFCU Disch–Falk Field on August 1, 2006.

See also

References

  1. ^ Cutler, Tami (June 11, 2013). "2013 Division I Baseball Attendance - Final Report". Sportswriters.net. NCBWA. Archived from the original on July 20, 2013. Retrieved July 20, 2013. 
  2. ^ Sorenson, Eric (5 October 2012). "Distiller's Dozen - The "Hey, Nice Stadium" Edition". CollegeBaseballToday.com. Archived from the original on 14 December 2012. Retrieved 14 December 2012. 
  3. ^ http://www.news-journal.com/blogs/content/shared-gen/blogs/austin/longhorns/entries/2008/08/15/new_turf_for_ba.html

External links

Coordinates: 30°16′47″N 97°43′35″W / 30.27972°N 97.72639°W / 30.27972; -97.72639








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