United States House of Representatives elections in Georgia, 2010

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The 2010 House elections in Georgia occurred on November 2, 2010, to elect the members of the State of Georgia's delegation to the United States House of Representatives. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected serve in the 112th Congress from January 3, 2011, until January 3, 2013. Georgia has thirteen seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census.

These elections were held concurrently with the United States Senate elections of 2010 (including one in Georgia), the United States House elections in other states, and various state and local elections.

Overview

The table below shows the total number and percentage of votes, as well as the number of seats gained and lost by each political party in the election for the United States House of Representatives in Georgia. In addition, the voter turnout and the number of votes not valid will be listed below.

United States House of Representatives elections in Georgia, 20101
Party Votes Percentage Seats +/–
Republican 1,513,642 61.7% 8 +1
Democratic 940,347 38.3% 5 -1
Others 3 0.0% 0 +/-0
Valid votes
Invalid or blank votes
Totals 2,453,992 100% 13
Voter turnout

District breakdown

The filing deadline for Democratic and Republican candidates was April 30. Third party candidates had until July 2 and while Independents had until September 7 to qualify for the ballot2 Information concerning major party candidates who have qualified is from the Secretary of State's cite3

District 1

United States House of Representatives, Georgia District 01, 110th Congress.png

Incumbent Republican Jack Kingston has held this district since 1993.

Candidates

Republican
Democratic

District 2

United States House of Representatives, Georgia District 02, 110th Congress.png

Democratic incumbent Sanford Bishop in running for reelection, challenged by Republican nominee state Representative Mike Keown.4

Keown surprised many pundits when he matched the incumbent almost dollar for dollar for fund raising in the second quarter of 2010.5 On September 15, Keown was promoted to the highest tier of the GOP Young Guns Program.6 Obama won this district with 54% in 2008, but in 2004 was much closer (under the 2001 configuration, Bush won this district with 50%, but under the 2005 configuration would have supported Kerry with 51%).78

Candidates

Democratic
Republican

Polling

Poll Source Dates Administered Sanford Bishop (D) Mike Keown (R) Undecided
Landmark Communications October 27, 2010 45.9% 50.2% 3.9%
Landmark Communications October 19, 2010 44.9% 47.2% 7.9%
Lester & Associates October 7–10, 2010 50% 40% 10%
Public Opinion Strategies September 27–28, 2010 47% 46% 7%
Public Opinion Strategies August 2–3, 2010 50% 44% 6%

District 3

United States House of Representatives, Georgia District 03, 110th Congress.png

Republican incumbent Lynn Westmoreland beat Democratic nominee Stephen Camp in 2008.

Frank Saunders (D) and small businessman Alan Weaver (I) will challenge Westmoreland.

Candidates

Republican
Democratic
Independent

District 4

United States House of Representatives, Georgia District 04, 110th Congress.png

Freshman Democratic incumbent Hank Johnson was unopposed on the ballot and easily defeated three write-in challengers in 2008. Johnson was opposed in the Democratic primary by former DeKalb County Executive Vernon Jones and DeKalb County Commissioner Connie Stokes.

Four Republicans sought the seat in the 2010 election cycle: Businesswoman Liz Carter,9 Airport Hangar Manager and Fair Tax advocate Larry Gause,10 Management Consultant Cory Ruth, and publisher Victor Armendariz.

Johnson won renomination with 55% of the vote over Jones with 26% and Stokes with 19%.11 The winner of Democratic primary will be strongly favored to win the election in November over the Republican nominee Liz Carter,1213 in this heavily Democratic Dekalb County based district.

Candidates

Democratic
Republican

Democratic Primary Polling

Poll Source Dates Administered Hank Johnson Vernon Jones Connie Stokes Undecided
Lake Research Partners January 14–20, 2010 47% 19% 12% 15%

District 5

United States House of Representatives, Georgia District 05, 110th Congress.png

Democratic incumbent John Lewis ran unopposed in 2008. Two Republicans, Fenn Little and Kelly Nguyen sought to be Lewis' opponent in November, with Little winning the primary. In addition Tea Party activist Steve Morris is ran as an independent.4

Candidates

Democratic
Republican
Independent

District 6

United States House of Representatives, Georgia District 06, 110th Congress.png

Republican incumbent Tom Price (campaign website) has held this seat since 2005.

Candidates

Tom Price will run unopposed by any Democratic or Republican challengers. Independents and third party candidates have yet to file.3

District 7

United States House of Representatives, Georgia District 07, 110th Congress.png

Republican incumbent John Linder (campaign website) has represented Georgia in Congress since 1993. On February 27, 2010, Linder announced that he would retire.14

Republican State Senator Don Balfour announced his candidacy two days later,15 but would withdraw from the contest on March 18 stating that he had "not been at peace about this decision."16 State Representative Clay Cox, businessman Tom Kirby, and Chief of Staff to John Linder Rob Woodall are currently regarded as the frontrunners in the Republican primary. State Senator David Shafer, former Sandy Springs City Councilman Doug MacGinnitie, Atlanta Brave Pitcher John Smoltz, former Christian Coalition Director and state Party Chairman Ralph Reed, and several Gwinnett County office holders, who were briefly the subjects of speculation to have interest in the race, all declined to run.1718

Iraq war veteran Doug Heckman (D), who lost to Linder in 2008, has filed to make another run.

Woodall, who finished first with 36%, and Jody Hice, who garnered 26% and surprised many pundits with his unexpectedly strong showing, advanced to the August 10 runoff.11 Despite Hice's support from local Tea party groups and also signing the taxpayer protection pledge, which Woodall would not sign (in perference of reforming the Tax code outright),19 Woodall, who was endorsed by Linder, Tom Price of the neighboring Sixth district, and former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee, defeated Hice 56% to 44% in the runoff and will likely succeed Linder in November.20

Candidates

Republican
Democratic

Polling

Republican Primary Polling (Runoff)

Poll Source Dates Administered Rob Woodall Jody Hice Undecided
Landmark Communication August 8, 2010 47.4% 31.8% 20.8%

District 8*

United States House of Representatives, Georgia District 08, 110th Congress.png

Democratic incumbent Jim Marshall in running for reelection, challenged by Republican nominee State Representative Austin Scott.

Earlier, Marshall was thought to have had interest in running for governor or the U.S. Senate.21 Marshall has had tough races more often than not, winning on recounts in 2002 and 2006. However, he won comfortably in 2008 and was thought to be secure. That changed on April 29, when Scott was recruited by Isakson political strategist Heath Garrett to run for this seat instead of running for Governor2223 Scott defeated two other candidates, educator Ken DeLoach and retired U.S. Army Nurse Diane Vann,24 in the Republican primary. Three other Republican candidates who had previously been in the race withdrew. Paul Rish and Angela M. Hicks both dropped out upon Scott's entry into the race while Valerie Meyers withdrew earlier on April 7.4 CNN contributor and Macon city councilman Erick Erickson in an op-ed in the Macon Telegraph in April stated that "Ironically, I have said since he first got elected in 2002 that this would be the year to beat Marshall."25 On September 15, Scott was promoted to the highest tier of the GOP Young Guns Program.6

Candidates

Democratic
Republican

Polling

Poll Source Dates Administered Jim Marshall (D) Austin Scott (R) Undecided
Landmark Communication October 27, 2010 38.7% 52.5% 8.8%
The Hill/ANGA October 19–21, 2010 37% 50% 13%
Landmark Communication October 19, 2010 35.1% 51.4% 13.5%
Mellman Group October 17–19, 2010 47% 44% 9%
American Viewpoint September 26–27, 2010 38% 46% 16%
Grove Insight September 13–15, 2010 48% 36% 16%
American Viewpoint July 27–29, 2010 44% 39% 17%

District 9

United States House of Representatives, Georgia District 09, 110th Congress.png

Republican incumbent Nathan Deal resigned to focus on his campaign for governor.262728 On the Republican side former state Senate Majority Leader Bill Stephens, state Senator Lee Hawkins, state Representatives Tom Graves29 and Bobby Reese, cardiologist Chris Cates, retired neurosurgeon Bert Loftman, Chickamauga city Councilman Steve Tarvin are running.30 Other potential Republican candidates included talk radio host Martha Zoller, state Representative James Mills, state Senator Chip Pearson, state House Speaker David Ralston,31 and former 12th district Congressman and teacher Max Burns.32 However, they all declined.

Among Democratic candidates, Hall County Democratic Party Chairman Mike Freeman was the only declared Democratic candidate, but withdrew due to recent issues concerning his family, but then unexpectedly dropped back in on April 26.33

Marketing Executive Eugene Moon will be running as an independent.34

On the May 11 special election, no candidate received a majority of votes to win outright, so the top two finishing candidates, Graves and Hawkins, will face each other in a run off on June 8.35 Graves defeated Hawkins in the run off to win election to the United States House of Representatives, however he will face Hawkins and the other Republican candidates, with the exception of Bill Stephens who chose not to run in the primary after his poor performance in the special election, who opposed him in the special election, as well as Bobby Reese, who didn't run in the special, in the Primary on July 20.36

Graves and Hawkins, who garnered 49.5% and 27% respectively in the Primary, faced off yet again on August 10.11 In the runoff, Graves, who had the support of local tea party groups and Club for Growth as well as endorsements from former House Speaker Newt Gingrich and Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney, both of which came after his victory in the special election, defeated Hawkins 55.2% to 44.8%.37 Graves will face nominal opposition from Moon, who also ran unsuccessfully in the special election, in November (note: Freeman ran in the special election but did not file to run in the general election).

Candidates

Republican
Independent

District 10

United States House of Representatives, Georgia District 10, 110th Congress.png

Republican incumbent Paul Broun holds this district. He will be challenged by Russell Edwards (D).

Solar Energy Equipment Salesman Cason Sisk (R) and Retired teacher Sandy Untermyer (D) had also announced runs, but ultimately withdrew.4

Candidates

Republican
Democratic

Fundraising

As of June 30, 2010. Source: Federal Election Commission38

Candidate (party) Receipts Disbursements Cash on hand Debt
Paul Broun (R) $1,414,038 $1,310,196 $136,154 $99,000
Russell Edwards (D) $102,349 $20,033 $82,316 $0

District 11

United States House of Representatives, Georgia District 11, 110th Congress.png

Republican incumbent Phil Gingrey (campaign website) represents this district.

Candidates

Gingrey will run unopposed by any Democratic or Republican challengers. Independents and third party candidates have yet to file.3 One publicly recognized grassroots candidate, Jeff Anderson of Acworth, Georgia, has yet to file state paperwork but has been conducting a personal and internet campaign for the 11th District seat since October, 2009. Mr. Anderson, a political newcomer, has cobbled together a small and steadily growing campaign of Republican, Democrat and Independent citizens, but failed to qualify for the general election ballot via petition in July, 2010. His campaign remains active as of August 8, 2010.39

District 12

United States House of Representatives, Georgia District 12, 110th Congress.png

Democratic incumbent John Barrow holds this seat. Former state Senator Regina Thomas will challenge Barrow in the Democratic primary, as she did unsuccessfully in 2008.40

Former Thunderbolt Councilman and current town fire chief Carl Smith, Savannah Republican activist Jeanne Seaver,41 investment adviser Mike Horner, and mechanical services manager Ray McKinney announced that they would challenge Barrow. Other potential Republican candidates included state Representatives Jon Burns and Bob Lane,42 but they both declined.

Barrow again won against former state Senator Regina Thomas in a rematch of their 2008 primary contest 58% to 42%.11 In the Republican primary, McKinney and Smith, who earned 43% and 28% respectively, headed to an August 10 runoff13 in which McKinney defeated Smith 62% to 38%.43

Candidates

Democratic
Republican

Fundraising

As of June 30, 2010. Source: Federal Election Commission44

Candidate (party) Receipts Disbursements Cash on hand Debt
John Barrow (D) $1,344,518 $713,334 $655,422 $0
Ray McKinney (R) $131,867 $35,680 $96,187 $115,000
Carl Smith (R) $57,160 $23,538 $33,621 $22,000

District 13

United States House of Representatives, Georgia District 13, 110th Congress.png

Democratic incumbent David Scott holds this district. Scott will be challenged in the Democratic primary by Michael Frisbee and Mike Murphy.45

A six candidate field for the Republican nomination has emerged with the most notable of them being physician and two time nominee Deborah Honeycutt.

Scott received negative publicity when he vitriolically accused a doctor, Dr. Brian Hill, who questioned him regardly the House Healthcare bill at a townhall meeting of not being a resident of the district. Follow-up questioning by local TV station WXIA-TV's news department interviewed Hill and confirmed that the doctor did live and work in Scott's district.46 However, Frisbee and Murphy have also criticized by some Democratic officials for the fact that they have not been members of the Democratic Party until recently.45 Despite the potential threat of Republican cross over voters aiding his challengers, Scott won renomination with 76% of the vote13 and will be heavily favored over the Republican nominee in November.

Candidates

Democratic
Republican

Fundraising

As of June 30, 2010. Source: Federal Election Commission47

Candidate (party) Receipts Disbursements Cash on hand Debt
David Scott (D) $538,029 $483,361 $57,236 $0
Deborah Honeycutt (R) $183,033 $265,567 $14,562 $7,901
Mike Crane (R) $49,917 $45,874 $4,043 $24,692

Key

* A district that has a PVI of a party that is represented by the opposite party, and applies to an EVEN score

References

  1. ^ "New York Times Election Results 2010". The New York Times. 
  2. ^ "Online Guide to Georgia Politics". Politics1. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  3. ^ a b c "Preliminary List of Candidates on the July 20, 2010 General Primary Election Ballot". Secretary of State of Georgia. May 4, 2010. Retrieved May 4, 2010. 
  4. ^ a b c d e "Georgia 2010 Midterm Election". Thegreenpapers.com. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  5. ^ McArdle, John (July 15, 2010). "Georgia: Keown on Par with Bishop in 2nd quarter Fundraising – The Eye (CQ Politics)". Blogs.cqpolitics.com. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  6. ^ a b http://blogs.cqpolitics.com/eyeon2010/2010/09/nrcc-to-add-18-new-young-guns.html
  7. ^ Member Profile (February 4, 1947). "Profile for Rep. Sanford D. Bishop Jr., Georgia Democrat, Southwest – Albany, part of Columbus and Valdosta suburbs". CQ Politics. Retrieved August 21, 2010. dead link
  8. ^ by: DavidNYC. "Presidential Results by Congressional District, 2000–2008". Swing State Project. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  9. ^ "Liz Carter for Congress". Cartuga.com. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  10. ^ "Hank Johnson draws a challenger. But who is Larry Gause?". http://www.peachpundit.com/. October 13, 2009. Retrieved December 3, 2009. 
  11. ^ a b c d "Graves Forced Into Runoff; Barrow, Johnson Win in Ga. – The Eye (CQ Politics)". Blogs.cqpolitics.com. July 20, 2010. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  12. ^ "Qualified Candidates for the July 20, 2010 Primary Election". Qual.sos.ga.gov. Retrieved June 14, 2010. 
  13. ^ a b c "7/20/2010 – Federal and Statewide". Sos.georgia.gov. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  14. ^ "Georgia: Linder Announces Retirement". http://www.cqpolitics.com/. February 27, 2010. Retrieved March 4, 2010. 
  15. ^ "Balfour First Republican To Enter Race to Succeed Linder". http://www.cqpolitics.com/. March 1, 2010. Retrieved March 4, 2010. 
  16. ^ McArdle, John (March 18, 2010). "Georgia: Balfour Drops Out of Race for Linder's Seat – The Eye (CQ Politics)". Blogs.cqpolitics.com. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  17. ^ McArdle, John (March 2, 2010). "Shafer Decides Against Georgia Race, Others Set to Join – The Eye (CQ Politics)". Blogs.cqpolitics.com. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  18. ^ "Doubling Up on GOP Jockeying in Georgia". http://www.cqpolitics.com/. March 2, 2010. Retrieved March 4, 2010. 
  19. ^ http://blogs.ajc.com/political-insider-jim-galloway/2010/08/03/your-morning-jolt-why-rob-woodall-refused-to-sign-a-pledge-not-to-increase-taxes/
  20. ^ McArdle, John (August 10, 2010). "Georgia: Woodall Wins GOP Nod to Succeed Linder – The Eye (CQ Politics)". Blogs.cqpolitics.com. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  21. ^ Wooten, Jim (May 11, 2008). "GOP ... on road to 2010 Georgia governor's race". The Atlanta Journal Constitution. Retrieved January 15, 2009. 
  22. ^ 3:07 pm April 27, 2010, by Jim Galloway (April 27, 2010). "Isakson strategist: Austin Scott should run against Jim Marshall | Political Insider". Blogs.ajc.com. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  23. ^ 2:04 pm April 29, 2010, by Jim Galloway (April 29, 2010). "The winnowing continues: Austin Scott runs for Congress | Political Insider". Blogs.ajc.com. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  24. ^ "Qualified Candidates for the November 2, 2010 General Election". Qual.sos.ga.gov. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  25. ^ "Erick Erickson: Jim Marshall (D) is Defeatable This Year". Peaches in Regalia. April 23, 2010. Retrieved July 11, 2010. 
  26. ^ "Sources: Deal to Run for Governor in Georgia". Roll Call. 
  27. ^ "Georgia GOP Rep. Nathan Deal leaving House for governor race". Boston Herald. March 1, 2010. Retrieved March 24, 2010. 
  28. ^ Montopoli, Brian (March 4, 2010). "GOP Rep. Nathan Deal Postpones Retirement to Fight Health Bill". CBS News. Retrieved March 24, 2010. 
  29. ^ POSTED: July 30, 2009 10:44 pm (July 30, 2009). "Hawkins will run for Congress". Gainesvilletimes.com. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  30. ^ "Qualified Candidates for Congressional District 9". Georgia Secretary of State. April 29, 2010. Retrieved April 29, 2010. 
  31. ^ "Potential candidates begin eyeing Deal's congressional seat (Archive)". Gainesvilletimes.com. April 29, 2009. Retrieved July 28, 2009. 
  32. ^ "Sources: Deal to Run for Governor in Georgia". Roll Call. April 28, 2009. Retrieved July 28, 2009. 
  33. ^ "Larry J. Sabato's Crystal Ball » STOPPING THE STREAK". Centerforpolitics.org. May 6, 2010. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  34. ^ "Eugene Moon for Congress". 
  35. ^ "5/11/2010 – U.S. Representative, District 9". Sos.georgia.gov. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  36. ^ McArdle, John (June 8, 2010). "Graves Headed to Congress". CQ Politics. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  37. ^ McArdle, John (August 10, 2010). "Graves Defeats Hawkins in Georgia Runoff – The Eye (CQ Politics)". Blogs.cqpolitics.com. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  38. ^ "2010 House and Senate Candidate List". Fec.gov:80. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  39. ^ http://www.jeffanderson2010.com
  40. ^ "Regina Thomas Announces 12th District Congressional Run". savannahtribune.com. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  41. ^ Larry Peterson (September 29, 2009). "Seaver wants to be the GOP standard bearer against Democrat Barrow". Savannah Morning News. Retrieved October 3, 2009. 
  42. ^ "Southern Political Report". Southern Political Report. March 30, 2009. Retrieved July 28, 2009. 
  43. ^ "8/10/2010 – Federal and Statewide". Sos.georgia.gov. August 10, 2010. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  44. ^ "2010 House and Senate Candidate List". Fec.gov:80. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  45. ^ a b Bynum, Russ (June 14, 2010). "Congressmen's rivals add touch of primary drama". Washington Examiner. Retrieved July 3, 2010. 
  46. ^ Carpenter, Amanda. "Georgia Democrat yells at local doctor over health care". Washington Times. Retrieved August 9, 2009. 
  47. ^ "2010 House and Senate Candidate List". Fec.gov:80. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 

External links








Creative Commons License