United States House of Representatives elections in Illinois, 2010

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Illinois's congressional districts in 2010

Elections were held on November 2, 2010, to determine Illinois's 19 members of the United States House of Representatives. Representatives were elected for two-year terms to serve in the 112th United States Congress from January 3, 2011 until January 3, 2013. Primary elections were held on February 2, 2010.1

Of the 19 elections, the 10th, 11th, 14th and 17th districts were rated as competitive by CQ Politics2 and The Rothenberg Political Report;3 while the 8th, 10th, 11th, 14th and 17th districts were rated as competitive by The Cook Political Report4 and Sabato's Crystal Ball.56789 Of Illinois's 19 U.S. Representatives, 14 were re-elected;10 of those who were not, one (Mark Kirk of the 10th district) did not seek re-election, while four (Melissa Bean of the 8th district, Debbie Halvorson of the 11th district, Bill Foster of the 14th district and Phil Hare of the 17th district) unsuccessfully sought re-election.11

In total, eleven Republicans and eight Democrats were elected.10 A total of 3,696,159 votes were cast, of which 1,876,316 (51 percent) were for Democratic candidates, 1,720,016 (47 percent) were for Republican candidates, 95,348 (3 percent) were for Green Party candidates, 4,428 (0.1 percent) were for independent candidates and 51 (0.001 percent) were for write-in candidates.12

Contents

District 1

Bobby Rush, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 1st district in 2010

In 2010 the 1st district included parts of Blue Island, Chicago, Oak Forest, Orland Park and Tinley Park.13 The district's population was 63 percent black, 26 percent white and 8 percent Hispanic (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 83 percent were high school graduates and 21 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $42,727.14 In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 87 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 13 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.13

Democrat Bobby Rush, who took office in 1993, was the incumbent. Rush was re-elected with 86 percent of the vote in 2008.13 In 2010 his opponent in the general election was Republican nominee Ray Wardingley, a retired entertainer. Green Party nominee Jeff Adams also ran.15 Harold Bailey, a manager for the Chicago Park District; Joanne Guillemette, an attorney; and Fred Smith, a program director at Maryville Academy, also sought the Democratic nomination.16 Adams was unopposed for the Green nomination.14

Rush raised $532,447 and spent $555,188.17 Rush was re-elected with 80 percent of the vote to Wardingley's 16 percent.18(p39) Rush was again re-elected in 2012.19

Democratic primary results

Illinois's 1st district Democratic primary, February 2, 201020(p47)
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bobby Rush (incumbent) 68,585 79.70%
Democratic Joanne Guillemette 8,035 9.34%
Democratic Fred Smith 5,203 6.05%
Democratic Harold Bailey 4,232 4.92%
Totals 86,055 100.00%

General election results

Illinois's 1st district general election, November 2, 201018(p39)
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bobby Rush (incumbent) 148,170 80.36%
Republican Ray Wardingley 29,253 15.87%
Green Jeff Adams 6,963 3.78%
Totals 184,386 100.00%

External links

District 2

Jesse Jackson, Jr., who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 2nd district

The 2nd district included Calumet City, Chicago Heights and part of Chicago.21 The district's population was 68 percent black, 18 percent white and 13 percent Hispanic (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 83 percent were high school graduates and 21 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $45,930.22 In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 90 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 10 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.21

Democrat Jesse Jackson, Jr., who took office in 1995, was the incumbent. Jackson was re-elected with 89 percent of the vote in 2008.21 In 2010 Jackson's opponent in the general election was Republican nominee Isaac Hayes, an associate minister at the Apostolic Church of God.23 Green Party nominee Anthony Williams also ran.24 Jackson and Hayes were unopposed in their respective primaries. Michael Mayden also sought the Green nomination.22

Jackson raised $795,723 and spent $1,032,506. Hayes raised $74,664 and spent $62,282.25 Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Jackson a 100 percent chance of winning, and projected that he would receive 77 percent of the vote to Hayes's 20 percent.26

On election day Jackson was re-elected with 81 percent of the vote to Hayes's 14 percent, while Williams received 6 percent.18(p39) Jackson was again re-elected in November 2012,27 but resigned from Congress the same month following ethics investigations and a diagnosis of mental illness.28 He was succeeded by Robin Kelly.29

Green primary results

Illinois's 2nd district Green primary, February 2, 201020(p47)
Party Candidate Votes %
Green Anthony Williams 128 59.81%
Green Michael Mayden 86 40.19%
Totals 214 100.00%

General election results

Illinois's 2nd district general election, November 2, 201018(p39)
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jesse Jackson, Jr. (incumbent) 150,666 80.52%
Republican Isaac Hayes 25,883 13.83%
Green Anthony Williams 10,564 5.65%
Totals 187,113 100.00%

External links

District 3

Dan Lipinski, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 3rd district

The 3rd district included Oak Lawn and parts of Berwyn and Chicago.30 The district's population was 58 percent white, 31 percent Hispanic and 6 percent black (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 81 percent were high school graduates and 23 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $56,296.31 In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 64 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 35 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.30

Democrat Dan Lipinski, who took office in 2005, was the incumbent. Lipinski was re-elected with 73 percent of the vote in 2008.30 In 2010 Lipinski's opponent in the general election was Republican nominee Michael A. Bendas, a retired Colonel in the U.S. Army Reserve.32 Green Party nominee Laurel Lambert Schmidt, a peace activist, also ran.33 Jorge Mujica, a community activist and former journalist, also sought the Democratic nomination.34 Bendas and Lambert Schmidt were unopposed in their respective primaries.31

Lipinski raised $752,199 and spent $455,329. Bendas raised $28,807 and spent $39,962.35 Mujica raised $12,668 and spent the same amount.36

Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Lipinski a 100 percent chance of winning, and projected that he would receive 67 percent of the vote to Bendas's 30 percent.37 On election day Lipinski was re-elected with 70 percent of the vote to Bendas's 24 percent.18(p40) Lipinski was again re-elected in 2012.38

Democratic primary results

Illinois's 3rd district Democratic primary, February 2, 201020(p48)
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dan Lipinski (incumbent) 57,684 77.89%
Democratic Jorge Mujica 16,372 22.11%
Totals 74,056 100.00%

General election results

Illinois's 3rd district general election, November 2, 201018(p40)
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dan Lipinski (incumbent) 116,120 69.69%
Republican Michael A. Bendas 40,479 24.29%
Green Laurel Lambert Schmidt 10,028 6.02%
Totals 166,627 100.00%

External links

District 4

Luis Gutiérrez, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 4th district

The 4th district included parts of Chicago, Cicero and Melrose Park.39 The district's population was 72 percent Hispanic, 19 percent white and 5 percent black (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 62 percent were high school graduates and 20 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $42,018.40 In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 85 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 13 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.39

Democrat Luis Gutiérrez, who took office in 1993, was the incumbent. Gutiérrez was re-elected with 81 percent of the vote in 2008.39 In 2010 Gutiérrez's opponent in the general election was Republican nominee Israel Vasquez, the chief executive officer of Wham Inc.41 Green Party nominee Robert J. Burns, a software architect, also ran.42 Gutiérrez and Burns were unopposed in their respective primaries.40

Gutiérrez raised $512,939 and spent $378,842.43 Gutiérrez was re-elected with 77 percent of the vote to Vasquez's 14 percent, while Burns received 8 percent.18(p40) Gutiérrez was again re-elected in 2012.44

General election results

Illinois's 4th district general election, November 2, 201018(p40)
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Luis Gutiérrez (incumbent) 63,273 77.36%
Republican Israel Vasquez 11,711 14.32%
Green Robert J. Burns 6,808 8.32%
Totals 81,792 100.00%

External links

District 5

Mike Quigley, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 5th district

The 5th district included parts of Chicago and Elmwood Park.45 The district's population was 60 percent white, 28 percent Hispanic and 7 percent Asian (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 83 percent were high school graduates and 37 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $60,427.46 In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 73 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 26 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.45

Democrat Mike Quigley, who took office in 2009, was the incumbent. Quigley was elected in a special election in April 2009 with 70 percent of the vote.47 In 2010 Quigley's opponent in the general election was Republican nominee David Ratowitz, an attorney and activist.48 Green Party nominee Matthew Reichel also ran. Quigley was unopposed in the Democratic primary.46 Ashvin Lad, a biomedical engineer;49 and Rosanna Pulido, an activist and lobbyist,50 also sought the Republican nomination. Terrence Gilhooly46 and Andrew Williams, who ran with the intention of highlighting the issue of campaign finance,51 also sought the Green nomination.

Quigley raised $1,301,374 and spent $1,087,121. Ratowitz raised $64,276 and spent the same amount.52 Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Quigley a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 69 percent of the vote to Ratowitz's 29 percent.53 On election day Quigley was re-elected with 71 percent of the vote to Ratowitz's 25 percent.18(p41) Quigley was again re-elected in 2012.54

Republican primary results

Illinois's 5th district Republican primary, February 2, 201020(p48)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David Ratowitz 5,689 39.64%
Republican Rosanna Pulido 4,722 32.90%
Republican Ashvin Lad 3,942 27.46%
Totals 14,353 100.00%

Green primary results

Illinois's 5th district Green primary, February 2, 201020(p48)
Party Candidate Votes %
Green Matthew Reichel 193 46.17%
Green Andrew Williams 137 32.78%
Green Terrence Gilhooly 88 21.05%
Totals 418 100.00%

General election results

Illinois's 5th district general election, November 2, 201018(p41)
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mike Quigley (incumbent) 108,360 70.62%
Republican David Ratowitz 38,935 25.38%
Green Matt Reichel 6,140 4.00%
Totals 153,435 100.00%

External links

District 6

Peter Roskam, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 6th district

The 6th district included Addison, Carol Stream, Lombard and parts of Elmhurst, Streamwood and Wheaton.55 The district's population was 68 percent white, 17 percent Hispanic and 10 percent Asian (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 89 percent were high school graduates and 36 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $71,058.56 In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 56 percent of its vote to Democratic Party nominee Barack Obama and 43 percent to Republican Party nominee John McCain.55

Republican Peter Roskam, who took office in 2007, was the incumbent. Roskam was re-elected in 2008 with 58 percent of the vote.55 In 2010 Roskam's opponent in the general election was Democratic nominee Ben Lowe, a local organizer and environmentalist.57 Roskam and Lowe were unopposed in their respective primaries.56

Roskam raised $2,381,858 and spent $1,251,223. Lowe raised $66,632 and spent $63,300.58 Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Roskam a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 63 percent of the vote to Lowe's 35 percent.59 On election day Roskam was re-elected with 64 percent of the vote to Lowe's 36 percent.18(p41) Roskam was again re-elected in 2012.60

General election results

Illinois's 6th district general election, November 2, 201018(p41)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Peter Roskam (incumbent) 114,456 63.65%
Democratic Ben Lowe 65,379 36.35%
Totals 179,835 100.00%

External links

District 7

Danny K. Davis, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 7th district

The 7th district included Oak Park and parts of Chicago and Maywood.61 The district's population was 54 percent black, 31 percent white, 8 percent Hispanic and 5 percent Asian (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 83 percent were high school graduates and 38 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $51,179.62 In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 88 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 12 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.61

Democrat Danny K. Davis, who took office in 1997, was the incumbent. Davis was re-elected in 2008 with 85 percent of the vote.61 Davis said in July 2009 that he would run for the presidency of the Cook County Board of Commissioners;63 however later that month Davis said he was prepared to seek re-election to Congress instead;64 and in November 2009 Davis announced he would seek re-election.65

In 2010 Davis's opponent in the general election was Republican nominee Mark Weiman, a dentist.66 Clarence Clemons, who has worked with Mayor of Chicago Eugene Sawyer and state representative Shirley Jones, ran as an independent candidate.67 James Ascot, a businessman and real estate agent; Sharon Denise Dixon, a member of the Chicago City Council; and Darlena Williams-Burnett, the chief deputy for the Cook County Recorder of Deeds, also sought the Democratic nomination.68 State representatives Annazette Collins and La Shawn K. Ford; Marshall Hatch, a community activist; and Rickey Hendon, a member of the Illinois Senate, had planned to run in the Democratic primary but abandoned their campaigns following Davis's announcement that he would seek re-election.69

Davis raised $593,861 and spent $864,982.70 Ascot raised $57,653 and spent the same amount.71 Dixon raised $35,533 and spent $22,979.72 Williams-Burnett raised $96,437 and spent $95,712.73 Hatch raised $20,218 and spent $12,683.74

Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Davis a 100 percent chance of winning, and projected that he would receive 78 percent of the vote to Weiman's 19 percent.75 On election day Davis was re-elected with 82 percent of the vote to Weiman's 16 percent.18(p42) Davis was again re-elected in 2012.76

Democratic primary results

Illinois's 7th district Democratic primary, February 2, 201020(p49)
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Danny K. Davis 52,728 66.77%
Democratic Sharon Denise Dixon 10,851 13.74%
Democratic Darlena Williams-Burnett 10,173 12.88%
Democratic James Ascot 5,221 6.61%
Totals 78,973 100.00%

General election results

Illinois's 7th district general election, November 2, 201018(p42)
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Danny K. Davis (incumbent) 149,846 81.50%
Republican Mark Weiman 29,575 16.09%
Independent Clarence Clemons 4,428 2.41%
Totals 183,849 100.00%

External links

District 8

Joe Walsh, who was elected as the U.S. Representative for the 8th district
Melissa Bean, who unsuccessfully sought re-election in the 8th district
Dirk Beveridge, who also ran in the Republican primary in the 8th district

The 8th district included parts of Hoffman Estates, Palatine and Schaumburg.77 The district's population was 71 percent white, 16 percent Hispanic and 8 percent Asian (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 90 percent were high school graduates and 36 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $75,522.78 In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 56 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 43 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.77 In 2010 the district had a Cook Partisan Voting Index of R+1.4

Democrat Melissa Bean, who took office in 2005, was the incumbent. Bean was re-elected in 2008 with 61 percent of the vote.77 In 2010 Bean's opponent in the general election was Republican nominee Joe Walsh, a venture capitalist.79 Green Party nominee Bill Scheurer, a businessman, also ran.80

Jonathan Farnick, a computer consultant who ran as a write-in candidate, also sought the Democratic nomination.81 Dirk Beveridge, a business owner; John Dawson, a former member of the Crystal Lake High School District 155 school board; Chris Geissler, a manager with a consulting firm; Greg Jacobs, a retired deputy in the Cook County Sheriff's Office; and Maria Rodriguez, the mayor of Long Grove, also sought the Republican nomination.82 Scheurer was unopposed in the Green primary.78

In March 2010 Walsh acknowledged having owned a condominium which went into foreclosure in 2008 and from which he was evicted in 2009. Walsh said the "experience helped [him] gain a better appreciation for the very real economic anxieties felt by 8th District families".83 Walsh came under further scrutiny in May 2010 after an email was sent to supporters by two former campaign aides questioning his veracity with regard to his personal income and campaign finances. Pat Brady, the chair of the Illinois Republican Party, said "questions have been raised and [Walsh] needs to provide satisfactory answers to those questions."84 Walsh was also sued by his former campaign manager for allegedly unpaid compensation, and was penalized by the U.S. House for failing to file disclosure reports. Later in May, Brady and other party leaders met with Walsh to determine his viability as a nominee. Following the meeting Brady said Walsh "is our nominee and we support him", while Walsh's campaign manager said "everything is moving forward".85

Bean raised $2,292,879 and spent $2,451,348. Walsh raised $624,694 and spent $602,803.86 Beveridge raised $232,669 and spent $231,639.87 Geissler raised $36,572 and spent $32,788.88 Rodriguez raised $132,347 and spent the same amount.89

In a poll of 827 likely voters, conducted by We Ask America (WAA) on February 18, 2010, Bean and Walsh had the support of 38 percent of respondents apiece, while 4 percent supported Scheurer and 20 percent were unsure.90 A poll of 1,381 registered voters, conducted by WAA on September 28, 2010, found Bean and Walsh tied again, with the support of 41 percent of respondents each.91 In WAA a poll of 773 likely voters conducted on October 31, 2010, 49 percent of respondents supported Walsh, while 46 percent favored Bean and Scheurer had the support of 6 percent.92

Sabato's Crystal Ball rated the race as "Likely Democratic", citing Bean's fundraising advantage and the district's 2008 presidential vote.5 In October 2010 The Cook Political Report rated the race as "Likely Democratic".4 Prior to the election FiveThirtyEights forecast gave Bean an 88 percent chance of winning, and projected that she would receive 53 percent of the vote to Walsh's 46 percent.91

On election day Walsh was elected with 48.5 percent of the vote to Bean's 48.3 percent.18(p42) Walsh declared victory the next day.93 The final votes were tallied on November 16; Bean conceded that night.94 In 2013 RealClearPolitics named the result as one of the "top 10 upsets" of the 2010 elections.95 Walsh unsuccessfully sought re-election in 2012.96

Democratic primary results

Illinois's 8th district Democratic primary, February 2, 201020(p50)
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Melissa Bean (incumbent) 25,000 99.90%
Democratic Jonathan Farnick 25 0.10%
Totals 25,025 100.00%

Republican primary results

Illinois's 8th district Republican primary, February 2, 201020(p50)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Joe Walsh 16,162 34.16%
Republican Dirk Beveridge 11,708 24.75%
Republican Maria Rodriguez 9.803 20.72%
Republican Chris Geissler 4,267 9.02%
Republican John Dawson 3,921 8.29%
Republican Greg Jacobs 1,445 3.05%
Totals 47,306 100.00%

General election results

Illinois's 8th district general election, November 2, 201018(p42)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Joe Walsh 98,115 48.47%
Democratic Melissa Bean (incumbent) 97,825 48.32%
Green Bill Scheurer 6,495 3.21%
Totals 202,435 100.0%

External links

Campaign websites

Further reading

District 9

Jan Schakowsky, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 9th district
Joel Pollak, who also ran in the 9th district

The 9th district included Evanston, Niles, Park Ridge, Skokie and parts of Chicago and Des Plaines.97 The district's population was 62 percent white, 13 percent Asian, 12 percent Hispanic and 10 percent black (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 87 percent were high school graduates and 43 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $56,413.98 In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 72 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 26 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.97

Democrat Jan Schakowsky, who took office in 1999, was the incumbent. Schakowsky was re-elected in 2008 with 75 percent of the vote.97 In June 2009 Schakowsky announced she would seek re-election rather than running for the U.S. Senate.99 In 2010 Schakowsky's opponent in the general election was Republican nominee Joel Pollak, a journalist and author.100 Green Party nominee Simon Ribeiro, a schoolteacher,101 also ran.98 Schakowsky and Pollak were unopposed in their respective primaries.98 Morris Shanfield, a retired journalist and peace activist, also sought the Green nomination.101

Schakowsky raised $1,520,106 and spent $1,633,678. Pollak raised $677,066 and spent $703,272.102 A poll of 945 likely voters, conducted by Magellan Data and Mapping Strategies on October 12, 2010 and released by Pollak's campaign, 48 percent of respondents supported Schakowsky while 30 percent favored Pollak.103

Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Schakowsky a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that she would receive 64 percent of the vote to Pollak's 32 percent.104 On election day Schakowsky was re-elected with 66 percent of the vote to Pollak's 31 percent.18(p43) Schakowsky was again re-elected in 2012.105

Green primary results

Illinois's 9th district Green primary, February 2, 201020(p50)
Party Candidate Votes %
Green Simon Ribeiro 191 56.51%
Green Morris Shanfield 147 43.49%
Totals 337 100.00%

General election results

Illinois's 10th district general election, November 2, 201018(p43)
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jan Schakowsky (incumbent) 117,553 66.34%
Republican Joel Pollak 55,182 31.14%
Green Simon Ribeiro 4,472 2.52%
Totals 177,207 100.00%

External links

District 10

Robert Dold, who was elected as the U.S. Representative for the 10th district

The 10th district included Buffalo Grove and parts of Arlington Heights and Waukegan.106 The district's population was 71 percent white, 15 percent Hispanic, 8 percent Asian and 5 percent black (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 90 percent were high school graduates and 51 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $85,468.107 In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 61 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 38 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.106 In 2010 the district had a Cook Partisan Voting Index of D+6.4

Republican Mark Kirk, who took office in 2001, was the incumbent. Kirk was re-elected in 2008 with 53 percent of the vote.106 In 2010 Kirk ran for the U.S. Senate rather than seeking re-election.108 The candidates in the general election were Republican nominee Robert Dold, who at the time ran his family business; and Democratic nominee Dan Seals, a social worker.109

Elizabeth Coulson, a member of the Illinois House of Representatives; Arie Friedman, a pediatrician; Dick Green, a businessman; and Paul Hamann, an options trader, also sought the Republican nomination.110 William Cadigan, an attorney, ended his campaign for the Republican nomination in December 2009.111 Julie Hamos, a member of the state House of Representatives; and Elliot Richardson, an attorney, also sought the Democratic nomination.112 In a poll of the Democratic primary by Anzalone Liszt Research for Seals's campaign, the results of which were published in August 2009, 63 percent of respondents supported Seals, while 8 percent favored Hamos and 2 percent chose Richardson.113 Michael Bond, a member of the Illinois Senate;114 and Milton Sumption, a businessman115 ended their respective campaigns for the Democratic nomination in December 2009. Susan Garrett, also a Democratic member of the state Senate, said in the same month that she had decided not to run.116 Richard B. Mayers, an unemployed admitted anti-Semite, sought the Green Party nomination117 but was removed from the ballot in November 2009 after failing to submit enough valid signatures.118

Dold raised $2,985,088 and spent $2,903,831. Seals raised $2,935,284 and spent $2,941,677.119 Coulson raised $525,640 and spent the same amount.120 Friedman raised $53,114 and spent $52,991.121 Green raised $628,020 and spent the same amount.122 Hamann raised $4,697 and spent the same amount.123 Cadigan raised $58,835 and spent the same amount.124 Hamos raised $1,243,678 and spent the same amount.125 Richardson raised $342,255 and spent $351,395.126 Bond raised $86,644 and spent the same amount.127 Sumption raised $38,602 and spent the same amount.128

In a poll of 878 likely voters, conducted on February 18, 2010 by We Ask America (WAA), Seals led with 40 percent to Dold's 37 percent while Mayers received the support of 2 percent.90 A poll by Anzalone Liszt Research, conducted between May 12 and 17, 2010 with a sample of 502 likely voters, found Seals leading with 46 percent to Dold's 38 percent.129 In a WAA poll of 1,015 registered voters, conducted on August 4, 2010, 43 percent of respondents supported Seals while 40 percent favored Dold and 17 percent chose another candidate or were undecided.130 A poll of 500 likely voters, conducted by Anzalone Liszt between August 30 and September 2, 2010, Seals led with 49 percent to Dold's 36 percent.131 In a poll of 405 likely voters, conducted by The Hill between October 2 and 7, 2010, 49 percent of respondents intended to vote for Seals, while 37 percent supported Dold and 11 percent were undecided.132 A poll of 1,148 likely voters, conducted by WAA on October 15, 2010, found Dold leading with 50 percent to Seals's 39 percent, while 11 percent were undecided.133 In a WAA poll of 861 likely voters, conducted on October 31, 2010, Dold led with 54 percent to Seals's 46 percent.92

Sabato's Crystal Ball rated the race as "Leans Democratic" in September 2010.6 In October 2010 The Cook Political Report rated the race as "Lean Democratic"4 and CQ Politics rated the race as "Leans Democratic".2 In November 2010 The Rothenberg Political Report rated the race as "Toss-up/Tilt Democrat".3 Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Seals a 68 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 52 percent of the vote to Dold's 48 percent.134

On election day Dold was elected with 51 percent of the vote to Seals's 49 percent.18(p43) In May 2011 Seals was appointed as the assistant director of the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity.135 Dold unsuccessfully sought re-election in 2012 and is running again in 2014.136

Republican primary results

Illinois's 10th district Republican primary, February 2, 201020(p51)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert Dold 19,691 38.03%
Republican Elizabeth Coulson 16,149 31.19%
Republican Dick Green 7,595 14.67%
Republican Arie Friedman 7,260 14.02%
Republican Paul Hamann 1,078 2.08%
Totals 51,773 100.00%

Democratic primary results

Illinois's 10th district Democratic primary, February 2, 201020(p51)
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dan Seals 25,490 48.22%
Democratic Julie Hamos 24,531 46.41%
Democratic Elliot Richardson 2,838 5.37%
Totals 52,859 100.00%

General election results

Illinois's 10th district general election, November 2, 201018(p43)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert Dold 109,941 51.08%
Democratic Dan Seals 105,290 48.92%
Write-in Author C. Brumfield 1 0.00%
Totals 215,232 100.00%

External links

District 11

Adam Kinzinger, who was elected as the U.S. Representative for the 11th district
Debbie Halvorson, who unsuccessfully sought re-election in the 11th district

The 11th district included Kankakee and parts of Bloomington, Joliet and Normal.137 The district's population was 79 percent white, 10 percent Hispanic and 8 percent black (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 88 percent were high school graduates and 21 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $58,652.138 In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 53 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 45 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.137 In 2010 the district had a Cook Partisan Voting Index of R+1.4

Democrat Debbie Halvorson, who took office in 2009, was the incumbent. Halvorson was elected with 58 percent of the vote in 2008.137 In 2010 Halvorson's opponent in the general election was Republican nominee Adam Kinzinger, a pilot with the Air National Guard.139 Halvorson was unopposed in the Democratic primary.138 David McAloon, the television and media producer for Family Harvest Church; Henry Meers Jr., a real estate investor; and Darrel Miller, a self-employed farmer, also sought the Republican nomination.140 Dave White ended his campaign for the Republican nomination in January 2010, though his name remained on the primary ballot.141

Halvorson raised $2,695,432 and spent $2,502,037. Kinzinger raised $1,881,629 and spent $1,827,192.142 McAloon raised $6,208 and spent $6,301.143 Meers raised $13,799 and spent $12,896.144

In a poll of 804 likely voters, conducted on February 18, 2010 by We Ask America (WAA), 42 percent of respondents supported Kinzinger while 30 percent favored Halvorson and 27 percent were unsure.90 A poll by Public Opinion Strategies (POS) for Kinzinger's campaign, the results of which were published in March 2010, found Kinzinger leading with 44 percent to Halvorson's 38 percent, while 16 percent were undecided.145 In a WAA poll of 1,015 registered voters, conducted on August 4, 2010, Kinzinger led with 52 percent to Halvorson's 32 percent, while 17 percent supported other candidates or were unsure.130 A POS poll of 400 likely voters, the results of which were released in August 2010, found Kinzinger leading with 51 percent to Halvorson's 40 percent.146 In a poll by The Hill and ANGA, conducted between September 28 and 30, 2010, with a sample of 401 likely voters, 49 percent of respondents backed Kinzinger, while 31 percent supported Halvorson and 18 percent remained undecided.147 A poll of 500 likely voters, conducted by Anzalone Liszt Research between October 5 and 7, 2010, found Kinzinger leading with 45 percent to Halvorson's 41 percent.148 A WAA poll of 828 likely voters, conducted on October 31, found Kinzinger leading with 55 percent to Halvorson's 45 percent.92

Sabato's Crystal Ball rated the race as "Leans Republican" in October 2010, citing polling data and Kinzinger's assistance from "the national Republican cavalry".7 The same month, The Cook Political Report rated the race as "Lean Republican"4 and CQ Politics rated the race as "Likely Republican".2 In November 2010 The Rothenberg Political Report rated the race as "Republican Favored".3 Prior to the election FiveThirtyEights forecast gave Kinzinger a 93 percent chance of winning, and projected that he would receive 55 percent of the vote to Halvorson's 45 percent.149

On election day Kinzinger was elected with 57 percent of the vote to Halvorson's 43 percent.18(p44) Kinzinger was re-elected in 2012.150 Halvorson unsuccessfully sought the Democratic nomination in a 2013 special election in the 2nd district.151

Republican primary results

Illinois's 11th district Republican primary, February 2, 201020(p52)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Adam Kinzinger 32,233 63.67%
Republican Dave White 5,257 10.38%
Republican David McAloon 4,880 9.64%
Republican Henry Meers Jr. 4,555 9.00%
Republican Darrel Miller 3,701 7.31%
Totals 50,626 100.00%

General election results

Illinois's 10th district general election, November 2, 201018(p44)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Adam Kinzinger 129,108 57.35%
Democratic Debbie Halvorson (incumbent) 96,019 42.65%
Totals 225,127 100.00%

Further reading

  • Hall, William K. (2011). "Illinois District 11 Race (Kinzinger v. Halvorson): A Freshman Incumbent Does Not Survive the Tsunami". In Foreman, Sean D.; Dewhirst, Robert. The Roads to Congress 2010 (Lanham, Maryland: Lexington Books). pp. 41–54. 

External links

District 12

Jerry Costello, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 12th district

The 12th district included Belleville, Carbondale, East St. Louis, Granite City, O'Fallon and part of Alton.152 The district's population was 78 percent white and 16 percent black (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 86 percent were high school graduates and 20 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $42,808.153 In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 56 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 43 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.152

Democrat Jerry Costello, who took office in 1988, was the incumbent. Costello was re-elected in 2008 with 71 percent of the vote.152 In 2010 Costello's opponent in the general election was Teri Newman, who previously ran a limousine service business.154 Green Party nominee Rodger Jennings also ran. Costello and Jennings were unopposed in their respective party primaries.153 Theresa Kormos, a nurse, also sought the Republican nomination.155

Costello raised $1,351,182 and spent $1,420,274. Jennings raised $445 and spent $110.156 Kormos raised $13,474 and spent the same amount.157

Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Costello a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 64 percent of the vote to Newman's 33 percent.158 On election day Costello was re-elected with 60 percent of the vote to Newman's 37 percent.18(p45) Costello retired rather than seeking re-election in 2012.159

Republican primary results

Illinois's 12th district Republican primary, February 2, 201020(p53)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Teri Newman 14,995 52.60%
Republican Theresa Kormos 13,510 47.40%
Totals 28,505 100.00%

General election results

Illinois's 12th district general election, November 2, 201018(p45)
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jerry Costello (incumbent) 121,272 59.83%
Republican Teri Newman 74,046 36.53%
Green Rodger Jennings 7,387 3.64%
Totals 202,705 100.00%

External links

District 13

Judy Biggert, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 13th district

The 13th district included Bolingbrook and parts of Aurora and Naperville.160 The district's population was 74 percent white, 10 percent Hispanic, 8 percent Asian and 6 percent black (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 93 percent were high school graduates and 46 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $84,132.161 In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 54 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 44 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.160

Republican Judy Biggert, who took office in 1999, was the incumbent. Biggert was re-elected in 2008 with 54 percent of the vote.160 In 2010 Biggert's opponent in the general election was Democratic nominee Scott Harper, an adjunct professor at North Central College and former business owner.162 Biggert and Harper were unopposed in their respective party primaries.161

Biggert raised $1,584,517 and spent $1,236,454. Harper raised $648,365 and spent $616,389.163 In a poll of 400 likely voters, conducted by the Global Strategy Group for Harper's campaign between June 28 and 30, 2010, 55 percent of respondents supported Biggert while 29 percent favored Harper.164 In a poll by Linda DiVall and Randall Gutermuth for Biggert's campaign, conducted on July 27 and 28, 2010, with a sample size of 400, Biggert led with 61 percent to Harper's 28 percent, while 10 percent were undecided.165

Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Biggert a 99 percent chance of winning and projected that she would receive 59 percent of the vote to Harper's 39 percent.166 On election day Biggert was re-elected with 64 percent of the vote to Harper's 36 percent.18(p45) Biggert unsuccessfully sought re-election in 2012.167

General election results

Illinois's 13th district general election, November 2, 201018(p45)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Judy Biggert (incumbent) 152,132 63.81%
Democratic Scott Harper 86,281 36.19%
Totals 238,413 100.00%

External links

District 14

Randy Hultgren, who was elected as the U.S. Representative for the 14th district
Bill Foster, who unsuccessfully sought re-election in the 14th district

The 14th district included Carpentersville, DeKalb and parts of Aurora and Elgin.168 The district's population was 74 percent white, 10 percent Hispanic, 8 percent Asian and 6 percent black (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 93 percent were high school graduates and 46 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $84,132.169 In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 55 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 44 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.168 In 2010 the district had a Cook Partisan Voting Index of R+1.4

Democrat Bill Foster, who was first elected in a March 2008 special election, was the incumbent. Foster was re-elected in November 2008 with 58 percent of the vote.168 In 2010 Foster's opponent in the general election was Republican nominee Randy Hultgren, a member of the Illinois Senate.170 Green Party nominee Daniel J Kairis, a substitute teacher,171 and Doug Marks, who ran as a write-in Libertarian Party candidate,172 also ran.

Bobby G. Rose also sought the Democratic nomination as a write-in candidate.173 Ethan Hastert, a lawyer and the son of former Speaker of the House Dennis Hastert, also sought the Republican nomination.174 Jim Purcell, a businessman, sought the Republican nomination but ended his campaign in December 2009.175 Jeff Danklefsen, who identified himself as "just a regular guy";176 and Mark Vargas, who worked for the United States Department of Defense,177 both ended their campaigns for the Republican nomination the same month.178 Bill Cross, a former Aurora alderman, ended his campaign for the Republican nomination in October 2009.179 Kairis was unopposed in the Green primary.169

Foster raised $3,804,082 and spent $3,737,519. Hultgren raised $1,581,719 and spent $1,552,578.180 Hastert raised $623,686 and spent the same amount.181 Purcell raised $42,200 and spent $39,384.182 Danklefsen raised $10,268 and spent $9,118.183 Vargas raised $8,460 and spent $9,421.184

In a poll of 817 likely voters, conducted by We Ask America (WAA) on February 18, 2010, 38 percent of respondents supported Hultgren while 36 percent favored Foster, 5 percent chose Kairis and 21 percent were undecided.90 A poll of 300 likely voters, conducted by the Tarrance Group for Hultgren's campaign on May 3 and 4, 2010, found Hultgren leading with 45 percent to Foster's 44 percent.185 A WAA poll of 1,028 registered voters, conducted on August 4, 2010, found Hultgren leading with 44 percent to Foster's 37 percent while 19 percent were undecided.130 In a poll of 400 likely voters, conducted by the Tarrance Group for Hultgren's campaign on October 3 and 4, 44 percent of respondents backed Hultgren, 38 percent chose Foster, 4 percent supported Kairis and 16 percent were undecided.186 In a poll of 400 likely voters, conducted by the Benenson Strategy Group between October 4 and 6, 2010, Foster led with 48 percent to Hultgren's 38 percent.187 A poll of 406 likely voters, conducted by Penn Schoen Berland between October 9 and 12, 2010, found Hultgren leading with 43 percent to Foster's 42 percent, while 12 percent were undecided.188 In a poll of 784 likely voters, conducted by WAA on October 31, Hultgren led with 50 percent while Foster received 45 percent and Kairis received 4 percent.92

Sabato's Crystal Ball rated the race as "Leans Republican".8 In October 2010 The Cook Political Report rated the race as a "toss up"4 and CQ Politics rated the race as a "tossup".2 In November 2010 The Rothenberg Political Report rated the race as "Toss-up/Tilt Republican".3 Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Hultgren a 52 percent chance of winning and projected that he and Foster would each receive 49 percent of the vote.189

On election day Hultgren was elected with 51 percent of the vote to Foster's 45 percent.18(p46) Hultgren was re-elected in 2012.190 The same year, Foster was elected in the 11th district.167

Democratic primary results

Illinois's 14th district Democratic primary, February 2, 201020(p54)
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bill Foster (incumbent) 25,446 100.00%
Democratic Bobby G. Rose 1 0.00%
Totals 25,447 100.00%

Republican primary results

Illinois's 14th district Republican primary, February 2, 201020(p54)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Randy Hultgren 34,833 54.71%
Republican Ethan Hastert 28,840 45.29%
Totals 63,673 100.00%

General election results

Illinois's 14th district general election, November 2, 201018(p46)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Randy Hultgren 112,369 51.31%
Democratic Bill Foster 98,645 45.04%
Green Daniel J Kairis 7,949 3.63%
Write-in Doug Marks 50 0.02%
Totals 190,139 100%

Further reading

  • Ashley, Jeffrey; Whitney, Joshua (2011). "Illinois District 14 Race (Hultgren v. Foster): A National Referendum Against the President and Incumbents". In Foreman, Sean D.; Dewhirst, Robert. The Roads to Congress 2010 (Lanham, Maryland: Lexington Books). pp. 25–40. 

External links

District 15

Tim Johnson, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 15th district
David Gill, who also ran in the 15th district

The 14th district included Champaign, Charleston, Danville, Mattoon, Urbana and parts of Bloomington and Normal.191 The district's population was 86 percent white and 6 percent black (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 89 percent were high school graduates and 27 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $46,218.192 In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 50 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 48 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.191

Republican Tim Johnson, who took office in 2001, was the incumbent. Johnson was re-elected in 2008 with 64 percent of the vote.191 In 2010 Johnson's opponent in the general election was Democratic nominee David Gill, who was also the Democratic nominee in 2004 and 2006.193 Johnson and Gill were unopposed in their respective party primaries.192

Johnson raised $342,063 and spent $270,407. Gill raised $145,099 and spent $142,417.194 Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Johnson a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 63 percent of the vote to Gill's 35 percent.195 On election day Johnson was re-elected with 64 percent of the vote to Gill's 36 percent.18(p47) In 2012 Johnson retired rather than seeking re-election,196 while Gill again ran unsuccessfully as the Democratic nominee.197

General election results

Illinois's 15th district general election, November 2, 201018(p47)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tim Johnson (incumbent) 136,915 64.32%
Democratic David Gill 75,948 35.68%
Totals 212,863 100.00%

External links

District 16

Don Manzullo, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 16th district
George Gaulrapp, who also ran in the 16th district

The 16th district included Lake in the Hills, Rockford and part of Crystal Lake.198 The district's population was 81 percent white, 10 percent Hispanic and 6 percent black (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 87 percent were high school graduates and 24 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $56,748.199 In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 53 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 46 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.198

Republican Don Manzullo, who took office in 1993, was the incumbent. Manzullo was re-elected in 2008 with 61 percent of the vote.198 In 2010 Manzullo's opponent in the general election was Democratic nominee George Gaulrapp, the mayor of Freeport.200 Green Party nominee Terry Campbell also ran. Manzullo, Gaulrapp and Campbell were all unopposed in their primaries.199

Manzullo raised $1,160,685 and spent $1,133,360. Gaulrapp raised $73,357 and spent $66,924.201 Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Manzullo a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 65 percent of the vote to Gaulrapp's 33 percent.202 On election day Manzullo was re-elected with 65 percent of the vote to Gaulrapp's 31 percent.18(p48) Manzullo unsuccessfully sought re-election in 2012.203

General election results

Illinois's 16th district general election, November 2, 201018(p48)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Don Manzullo (incumbent) 138,299 65.00%
Democratic George Gaulrapp 66,037 31.04%
Green Terry Campbell 8,425 3.96%
Totals 212,761 100.00%

External links

District 17

Bobby Schilling, who was elected as the U.S. Representative for the 17th district
Phil Hare, who unsuccessfully sought re-election in the 17th district

The 17th district included Moline, Quincy, Rock Island and part of Decatur.204 The district's population was 85 percent white, 8 percent black and 5 percent Hispanic (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 85 percent were high school graduates and 18 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $41,128.205 In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 56 percent of its vote to Democratic Party nominee Barack Obama and 42 percent to Republican Party nominee John McCain.204 In 2010 the district had a Cook Partisan Voting Index of D+3.4

Democrat Phil Hare, who took office in 2007, was the incumbent. Hare was re-elected unopposed in 2008.204 In 2010 Hare's opponent in the general election was Republican nominee Bobby Schilling, a restaurant owner.206 Green Party nominee Roger K. Davis, a former guard at Stateville Correctional Center, also ran.207 Hare, Schilling and Davis were all unopposed in their primaries.205 Hare raised $1,364,578 and spent $1,759,078. Schilling raised $1,103,009 and spent $1,093,250.208

In a poll of 1,056 likely voters, conducted on February 18, 2010 by We Ask America (WAA), 39 percent of respondents supported Hare, while 32 percent favored Schilling, 4 percent chose Davis, and 26 percent were unsure.90 In a poll of 715 likely voters, conducted by Magellan Strategies for Schilling's campaign on July 12, 2010, Schilling led with 45 percent to Hare's 32 percent while 23 percent were undecided.209 A poll by Public Opinion Strategies (POS), the results of which were published in August 2010, found Hare leading with 33 percent to Schilling's 31 percent, while Davis had the support of 7 percent and 30 percent were undecided.210 A WAA poll of 1,250 likely voters, conducted on September 8, 2010, found 41 percent of respondents supported Schilling, while 38 percent backed Hare, 4 percent chose Davis and 17 percent were undecided.211 In a poll by the Tarrance Group for the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC), conducted between September 23 and 25, 2010, Schilling led with 44 percent to Hare's 43 percent.212 A POS poll of 400 likely voters, conducted on September 26 and 27, 2010, found Hare leading with 38 percent to Schilling's 37 percent.213 In a poll conducted for the NRCC, the results of which were published in October 2010, Schilling led with 44 percent to Hare's 41 percent.214 A poll of 417 likely voters, conducted by Penn Schoen Berland between October 12 and 14, 2010, found Schilling leading with 45 percent to Hare's 38 percent, while 14 percent were undecided.188 In a WAA poll of 1,103 likely voters, conducted on October 31, 2010, 52 percent of respondents supported Schilling, while 44 percent favored Hare and 4 percent backed Davis.92

Sabato's Crystal Ball rated the race as "Leans Republican".9 In October 2010, The Cook Political Report rated the race as a "toss up"4 and CQ Politics rated the race as a "tossup".2 In November 2010 The Rothenberg Political Report rated the race as "Toss-up/Tilt Republican".3 Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Schilling a 63 percent chance of winning, and projected that he would receive 50 percent of the vote to Hare's 48 percent.215 On election day Schilling was elected with 53 percent of the vote to Hare's 43 percent.18(p49) Schilling unsuccessfully sought re-election in 2012.216

General election results

Illinois's 17th district general election, November 2, 201018(p49)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bobby Schilling 104,583 52.58%
Democratic Phil Hare 85,454 42.96%
Green Roger K. Davis 8,861 4.46%
Totals 198,898 100.00%

External links

District 18

Aaron Schock, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 18th district

The 18th district included East Peoria, Pekin, Peoria and part of Springfield.217 The district's population was 88 percent white and 7 percent black (see Race and ethnicity in the United States); 89 percent were high school graduates and 24 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $50,932.218 In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 50 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 48 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.217

Republican Aaron Schock, who took office in 2009, was the incumbent. Schock was elected in 2008 with 59 percent of the vote.217 In 2010 Schock's opponent in the general election was Deirdre "DK" Hirner, the former director of the Illinois Environmental Regulatory Group. Green Party nominee Sheldon Schafer, the vice president and director of the Lakeview Museum, also ran.219 Schock and Schafer were unopposed in their respective party primaries.218 Carl Ray, a former capital and capacity planner (see Capital planning and Capacity planning) with Caterpillar Inc., also sought the Democratic nomination.219

Schock raised $2,300,387 and spent $1,303,848. Hirner raised $135,859 and spent the same amount. Schafer raised $4,055 and spent $4,059.220 Ray raised $2,860 and spent $2,990.221

Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Schock a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 66 percent of the vote to Hirner's 31 percent.222 On election day Schock was re-elected with 69 percent of the vote to Hirner's 26 percent, while Schafer received 5 percent.18(p50) Schock was again re-elected in 2012.223

Democratic primary results

Illinois's 18th district Democratic primary, February 2, 201020(p58)
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Deirdre "DK" Hirner 13,683 54.19%
Democratic Carl Ray 11,566 45.81%
Totals 25,249 100.00%

General election results

Illinois's 18th district general election, November 2, 201018(p50)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Aaron Schock 152,868 69.12%
Democratic Deirdre "DK" Hirner 57,046 25.79%
Green Sheldon Schafer 11,256 5.09%
Totals 221,170 100.00%

External links

District 19

John Shimkus, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 19th district

The 19th district included parts of Collinsville, Edwardsville and Springfield.224 The district's population was 93 percent white (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 87 percent were high school graduates and 21 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $48,654.225 In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 54 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 44 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.224

Republican John Shimkus, who took office in 1997, was the incumbent. Shimkus was re-elected in 2008 with 65 percent of the vote.224 In 2010 Shimkus's opponent in the general election was Democratic nominee Tim Bagwell, an information technology specialist who also ran in 2004.226 Michael Firsching, a veterinarian, also sought the Republican nomination.227 Bagwell was unopposed in the Democratic primary.228

Shimkus raised $1,845,128 and spent $1,852,867. Bagwell raised $17,763 and spent $17,649.229 Firsching raised $537 and spent no money.230

Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Shimkus a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 69 percent of the vote to Bagwell's 29 percent.231 On election day Shimkus was re-elected with 71 percent of the vote to Bagwell's 29 percent.18(p51) Shimkus was again re-elected in 2012.232

Republican primary results

Illinois's 19th district Republican primary, February 2, 201020(p59)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Shimkus (incumbent) 48,680 85.34%
Democratic Michael Firsching 8,363 14.66%
Totals 57,043 100.00%

General election results

Illinois's 19th district general election, November 2, 201018(p51)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Shimkus 166,166 71.22%
Democratic Tim Bagwell 67,132 28.78%
Totals 233,298 100.00%

External links

See also

References

  1. ^ "2010 General Primary and General Election". Illinois State Board of Elections. Retrieved January 31, 2014. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "Race Ratings Chart: House". CQ Politics. Archived from the original on October 28, 2010. Retrieved January 20, 2014. 
  3. ^ a b c d e "House Ratings". The Rothenberg Political Report. November 1, 2010. Retrieved January 20, 2014. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "2010 competitive House race chart". The Cook Political Report. October 26, 2010. Archived from the original on October 28, 2010. Retrieved February 1, 2014. 
  5. ^ a b "Illinois (08) House 2010". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved February 1, 2014. 
  6. ^ a b "Illinois (10) House 2010". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved February 1, 2014. 
  7. ^ a b "Illinois (11) House 2010". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved February 1, 2014. 
  8. ^ a b "Illinois (14) House 2010". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved February 1, 2014. 
  9. ^ a b "Illinois (17) House 2010". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved February 1, 2014. 
  10. ^ a b "Illinois". The New York Times. Retrieved February 1, 2014. 
  11. ^ Stewart, Russ (August 9, 2013). "Missing voters key to GOP 2014 comeback". Nadig Newspapers. Retrieved February 1, 2014. 
  12. ^ Haas, Karen L. (June 3, 2011). "Statistics of the congressional election of November 2, 2010". Clerk of the United States House of Representatives. p. 17. Retrieved February 1, 2014. 
  13. ^ a b c "Illinois – 1st District". Roll Call. Retrieved February 1, 2014. 
  14. ^ a b "Illinois 1st District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved February 6, 2014. 
  15. ^ Stevens, Susan S. (October 29, 2010). "Local Congressional elections see three-candidate races". The Gazette. Retrieved February 1, 2014. 
  16. ^ Stevens, Susan S. (January 28, 2010). "Incumbent Rush Challenged by Three in 1st District (Bronzeville)". The Gazette. Retrieved February 1, 2014. 
  17. ^ "Illinois District 01 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved February 1, 2014. 
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al "General Election of November 2, 2010". Illinois State Board of Elections. Retrieved February 1, 2014. 
  19. ^ Feldheim, Ben (November 7, 2012). "Bobby Rush Wins 11th Term in Congress". Orland Park Patch. Retrieved February 1, 2014. 
  20. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q "Official vote". Illinois State Board of Elections. Retrieved February 1, 2014. 
  21. ^ a b c "Illinois – 2nd District". Roll Call. Retrieved February 2, 2014. 
  22. ^ a b "Illinois 2nd District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved February 2, 2014. 
  23. ^ Kass, John (September 26, 2010). "He's not that Isaac Hayes, and people are starting to notice". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved February 2, 2014. 
  24. ^ "Jackson prevails in re-election bid". The Times of Northwest Indiana. November 2, 2010. Retrieved February 2, 2014. 
  25. ^ "Illinois District 02 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved February 2, 2014. 
  26. ^ "Illinois 2nd District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved February 2, 2014. 
  27. ^ Ure, Laurie (November 6, 2012). "Jesse Jackson Jr. wins re-election". CNN. Retrieved February 2, 2014. 
  28. ^ Skiba, Katherine; Pearson, Rick (November 22, 2012). "Jesse Jackson Jr. resigns from Congress, acknowledges federal probe". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved February 2, 2014. 
  29. ^ "Robin Kelly coasts to victory in special election to replace former Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr.". Daily News. April 10, 2013. Retrieved February 2, 2014. 
  30. ^ a b c "Illinois – 3rd District". Roll Call. Retrieved February 2, 2014. 
  31. ^ a b "Illinois 3rd District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved February 6, 2014. 
  32. ^ "Michael A Bendas, U.S. House of Representatives 3rd Dist.". abc7chicago.com. Retrieved February 4, 2014. 
  33. ^ "Green Party challenger knocks Lipinski's health care vote". Riverside Brookfield Landmark. March 30, 2010. Retrieved February 4, 2014. 
  34. ^ "Mujica Challenges Incumbent Lipinski in 3rd District (Bridgeport)". The Gazette. January 28, 2010. Retrieved February 4, 2014. 
  35. ^ "Illinois District 03 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved February 4, 2014. 
  36. ^ "Jorge Mujica (D)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved February 4, 2014. 
  37. ^ "Illinois 3rd District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved February 4, 2014. 
  38. ^ "Rep. Dan Lipinski wins 3rd District Congressional race for U.S. House". FOX 32 News. November 6, 2012. Retrieved February 4, 2014. 
  39. ^ a b c "Illinois – 4th District". Roll Call. Retrieved February 4, 2014. 
  40. ^ a b "Illinois 4th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved February 6, 2014. 
  41. ^ "Israel Vasquez". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved February 4, 2014. 
  42. ^ "Robert J. Burns". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved February 4, 2014. 
  43. ^ "Illinois District 04 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved February 7, 2014. 
  44. ^ "Rep. Luis Gutierrez wins 4th District Congressional race for U.S. House". Fox 32 News. November 6, 2012. Retrieved February 7, 2014. 
  45. ^ a b "Illinois – 5th District". Roll Call. Retrieved February 7, 2014. 
  46. ^ a b c "Illinois 5th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved February 7, 2014. 
  47. ^ McCormick, John (April 8, 2009). "5th Congressional District: Mike Quigley wins election to Congress". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved February 7, 2014. 
  48. ^ "David Ratowitz, Candidate for U.S. House of Representatives, IL-5". abc7chicago.com. Retrieved February 7, 2014. 
  49. ^ "Ashvin Lad". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved February 7, 2014. 
  50. ^ "Rosanna Pulido". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved February 7, 2014. 
  51. ^ "Andrew Williams". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved February 7, 2014. 
  52. ^ "Illinois District 05 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved February 7, 2014. 
  53. ^ "Illinois 5th District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved February 7, 2014. 
  54. ^ "Illinois Congressional District 5 election results". NBC News.com. Retrieved February 7, 2014. 
  55. ^ a b c "Illinois – 6th District". Roll Call. Retrieved February 14, 2014. 
  56. ^ a b "Illinois 6th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved February 14, 2014. 
  57. ^ "Racial Profiling: Ben Lowe, Half-Chinese Democrat For Congress, Frisked For 'Looking Hispanic'". The Huffington Post. July 7, 2010. Retrieved February 14, 2014. 
  58. ^ "Illinois District 06 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved February 14, 2014. 
  59. ^ "Illinois 6th District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved February 14, 2014. 
  60. ^ Pyke, Marni (November 7, 2012). "Roskam keeps his 6th District seat". Daily Herald. Retrieved February 23, 2014. 
  61. ^ a b c "Illinois – 7th District". Roll Call. Retrieved February 14, 2014. 
  62. ^ "Illinois 7th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 21, 2014. 
  63. ^ Marin, Carol (July 16, 2009). "Have we moved past politics of race?". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on July 22, 2009. Retrieved February 23, 2014. 
  64. ^ Toeplitz, Shira (September 29, 2009). "7th District Democrats Wait on Davis Decision in Illinois". Roll Call. Retrieved February 23, 2014. 
  65. ^ "Congressman Davis drops run for Cook County president". Chicago Tribune. November 9, 2009. Retrieved February 14, 2014. 
  66. ^ Klockars, Karl (October 29, 2010). "AustinTalks sits down with congressional candidate Mark Weiman". AustinTalks. Retrieved February 14, 2010. 
  67. ^ "Clarence Clemons". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved February 23, 2014. 
  68. ^ Stevens, Susan S. (January 28, 2010). "Davis, Dixon, Williams-Burnett, Ascot Vie for 7th District Seat". The Gazette. Retrieved February 23, 2014. 
  69. ^ Thomas, Charles (November 9, 2009). "Man of His Word". abc7chicago.com. Retrieved February 23, 2014. 
  70. ^ "Illinois District 07 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved February 23, 2014. 
  71. ^ "James Ascot (D)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved February 23, 2014. 
  72. ^ "Sharon Denise Dixon (D)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved February 23, 2014. 
  73. ^ "Darlena Williams-Burnett (D)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved February 23, 2014. 
  74. ^ "Marshall Hatch (D)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved February 23, 2014. 
  75. ^ "Illinois 7th District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved February 23, 2014. 
  76. ^ "Rep. Danny Davis wins 7th District Congressional race for U.S. House". FOX 32 News. November 6, 2012. Retrieved February 24, 2014. 
  77. ^ a b c "Illinois – 8th District". Roll Call. Retrieved February 24, 2014. 
  78. ^ a b "Illinois 8th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved February 26, 2014. 
  79. ^ "For the U.S. House". Chicago Tribune. October 7, 2010. p. 2. Retrieved February 26, 2014. 
  80. ^ "Bill Scheurer". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved February 26, 2014. 
  81. ^ Lissau, Russell (January 5, 2010). "Woodstock's Jonathan Farnick running as write-in for 8th District". Daily Herald. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  82. ^ Lissau, Russell (January 31, 2010). "Six Republicans running to battle Melissa Bean in 8th Congressional". Daily Herald. Retrieved February 26, 2014. 
  83. ^ Lissau, Russell (March 3, 2010). "8th Dist. challenger lost condo to foreclosure". Daily Herald. Retrieved February 28, 2014. 
  84. ^ Pearson, Rick (May 3, 2010). "Bean’s GOP opponent getting renewed scrutiny from party leaders". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved February 28, 2014. 
  85. ^ Ryan, Joseph; Lissau, Russell (May 6, 2010). "GOP bosses sit down with Walsh, but don't ask him to step aside". Daily Herald. Retrieved February 28, 2014. 
  86. ^ "Illinois District 08 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved February 26, 2014. 
  87. ^ "Dirk Beveridge (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved February 26, 2014. 
  88. ^ "Christopher Todd Geissler (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved February 26, 2014. 
  89. ^ "Maria Rodriguez (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved February 26, 2014. 
  90. ^ a b c d e "Illinois: an early compilation of key districts". We Ask America. March 18, 2010. Retrieved February 26, 2014. 
  91. ^ a b "Illinois 8th District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  92. ^ a b c d e "As goes Illinois...". We Ask America. November 1, 2010. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  93. ^ Peterson, Eric (November 3, 2010). "Walsh claims victory with all precincts counted". Daily Herald. Retrieved February 28, 2014. 
  94. ^ Hinkel, Dan; Skiba, Katherine (November 16, 2010). "Bean concedes to Walsh in 8th District". Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on November 18, 2010. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  95. ^ "Top 10 Upsets of 2010". RealClearPolitics. October 24, 2013. p. 5. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  96. ^ Howley, Kerry (November 6, 2012). "Tammy Duckworth Wins in Illinois, as Does Gerrymandering and Deadbeat-Dad Shaming". Slate. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  97. ^ a b c "Illinois – 9th district". Roll Call. Retrieved February 28, 2014. 
  98. ^ a b c "Illinois 9th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 5, 2014. 
  99. ^ Toeplitz, Shira (June 8, 2009). "Schakowsky Nixes Senate Bid". Roll Call. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  100. ^ Warren, Michael (September 3, 2010). "Pollak v. Schakowsky". The Weekly Standard. Retrieved February 28, 2014. 
  101. ^ a b Krishnamurthy, Madhu (January 31, 2010). "9th Congressional Greens: Get U.S. out of Middle East". Daily Herald. Retrieved March 5, 2014. 
  102. ^ "Illinois District 09 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 5, 2014. 
  103. ^ "New poll shows Schakowsky below 50%". Joel Pollak for Congress. October 14, 2010. Archived from the original on October 14, 2010. Retrieved March 5, 2014. 
  104. ^ "Illinois 9th District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  105. ^ "Rep. Jan Schakowsky wins 9th District Congressional race for U.S. House". FOX 32 News. November 6, 2012. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  106. ^ a b c "Illinois – 10th District". Roll Call. Retrieved March 14, 2014. 
  107. ^ "Illinois 10th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 21, 2014. 
  108. ^ Cillizza, Chris (July 8, 2009). "Kirk Will Run For Illinois Senate". The Washington Post. Retrieved March 14, 2014. 
  109. ^ Schulte, Sarah (October 22, 2010). "Seals, Dold battle for 10th District". abc7chicago.com. Retrieved March 14, 2014. 
  110. ^ Garvey, Georgia (January 15, 2010). "10th District Republican primary". Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on January 17, 2010. Retrieved March 14, 2014. 
  111. ^ "William Cadigan Drops Out of 10th Congressional District GOP Race, Lack of Funding Decision". Arlington Cardinal. December 17, 2009. Retrieved March 14, 2014. 
  112. ^ Garvey, Georgia (January 15, 2010). "10th District Democratic primary". Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on January 27, 2010. Retrieved March 14, 2014. 
  113. ^ Cillizza, Chris (August 10, 2009). "Morning Fix: Dodd Rises Again (Or Not)". The Washington Post. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  114. ^ Lissau, Russell (July 31, 2009). "Bond drops out of 10th Congressional District race". Daily Herald. Retrieved March 14, 2014. 
  115. ^ Stiefel, Lynne (December 4, 2009). "Democrat drops out of congressional race; 1 out in 17th House". Lake Villa Review. Retrieved March 14, 2014. 
  116. ^ Toeplitz, Shira (July 21, 2009). "GOP Faces Uphill Battle to Hold Moderate Kirk's Seat". Roll Call. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  117. ^ Lissau, Russell (November 19, 2009). "Green Party challenges 10th Dist. candidate's petitions". Daily Herald. Retrieved March 14, 2014. 
  118. ^ Lissau, Russell (December 17, 2009). "Anti-Semite booted from ballot in 10th District race". Daily Herald. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  119. ^ "Illinois District 10 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 14, 2014. 
  120. ^ "Elizabeth Coulson (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 14, 2014. 
  121. ^ "Arie Friedman (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 14, 2014. 
  122. ^ "Richard Cronkhite Green (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 14, 2014. 
  123. ^ "Paul Hamann (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 14, 2014. 
  124. ^ "William J. Cadigan (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 14, 2014. 
  125. ^ "Julie Hamos (D)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 14, 2014. 
  126. ^ "Elliot Richardson (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 14, 2014. 
  127. ^ "Michael Bond (D)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 14, 2014. 
  128. ^ "Milton J. Sumption (D)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 14, 2014. 
  129. ^ Liszt, Jeff; Stryker, Brian (May 24, 2010). "Summary of General Election Polling Results in Illinois CD-10". Anzalone Liszt Research. Archived from the original on July 14, 2012. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  130. ^ a b c "Adventures in Blago-land". We Ask America. August 20, 2010. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  131. ^ Liszt, Jeff; Stryker, Brian (September 7, 2010). "Summary of General Election Polling Results in Illinois CD-10". Anzalone Liszt Research. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  132. ^ Goodin, Emily; Miller, Sean J.; D'Aprile, Shane (October 13, 2010). "THE HILL POLL: A district-by-district analysis of results and interactive map". The Hill. Archived from the original on October 15, 2010. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  133. ^ "We're baaack". We Ask America. October 15, 2010. Retrieved March 15, 2010. 
  134. ^ "Illinois 10th District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  135. ^ "Losing candidate Dan Seals appointed to Illinois job". Rockford Register Star. May 10, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  136. ^ Skiba, Katherine (May 8, 2013). "Bob Dold wants his House seat back". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  137. ^ a b c "Illinois – 11th district". Roll Call. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  138. ^ a b "Illinois 11th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  139. ^ Schorsch, Kirsten (October 19, 2010). "Kinzinger out to recapture 11th District seat for GOP". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  140. ^ Farrell, Michael (January 28, 2010). "Four seek chance to face Halvorson in November". Morris Daily Herald. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  141. ^ Riopell, Mike (January 18, 2010). "GOP candidate drops out of local congressional race". The Pantagraph. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  142. ^ "Illinois District 11 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  143. ^ "David McAloon (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  144. ^ "Henry W. Meers Jr (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  145. ^ "Opponent's Poll: Halvorson In Competitive Race". Roll Call. March 23, 2010. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  146. ^ Pallasch, Abdon M. (August 10, 2010). "Kinzinger poll puts him in front". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on August 18, 2010. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  147. ^ D'Aprile, Shane (October 6, 2010). "District by district – Illinois". The Hill. Archived from the original on October 9, 2010. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  148. ^ "Dem poll: Halvorson closes gap". The Times of Northwest Indiana. October 19, 2010. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  149. ^ "Illinois 11th District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  150. ^ Sweeny, Chuck (November 7, 2012). "Election 2012: Adam Kinzinger retains 16th U.S. House seat". Rockford Register Star. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  151. ^ Yaccino, Steven (February 26, 2013). "Candidate Who Backs Gun Control Wins Race". The New York Times. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  152. ^ a b c "Illinois – 12th District". Roll Call. Retrieved March 16, 2014. 
  153. ^ a b "Illinois 12th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 16, 2014. 
  154. ^ Fitzgerald, Scott (October 15, 2010). "Fiery Newman ready to face Jerry Costello". The Southern Illinoisan. Retrieved March 16, 2014. 
  155. ^ Erickson, Kurt (January 25, 2010). "Two vie to take on Costello in 12th district". The Southern Illinoisan. Retrieved March 16, 2014. 
  156. ^ "Illinois District 12 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 16, 2014. 
  157. ^ "Theresa Kormos (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 16, 2014. 
  158. ^ "Illinois 12th District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved March 16, 2014. 
  159. ^ Miller, Joshua (October 4, 2011). "Jerry Costello to Retire in 2012". Roll Call. Retrieved March 16, 2014. 
  160. ^ a b c "Illinois – 13th district". Roll Call. Retrieved March 16, 2014. 
  161. ^ a b "Illinois 13th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 16, 2014. 
  162. ^ Leventis Lourgos, Angie (October 22, 2010). "Democrat wages a repeat challenge against Biggert". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved March 16, 2014. 
  163. ^ "Illinois District 13 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 16, 2014. 
  164. ^ Sweet, Lynn (July 29, 2010). "Democrat Scott Harper Illinois House 13 campaign sees promise in poll.". Chicago Sun-Times. Retrieved March 17, 2014. 
  165. ^ Sweet, Lynn (July 29, 2010). "Rep. Judy Biggert Illinois House 13th district poll puts her in lead". Chicago Sun-Times. Retrieved March 17, 2014. 
  166. ^ "Illinois 13th District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved March 17, 2014. 
  167. ^ a b "Judy Biggert Concedes Race To Bill Foster". CBS Chicago. November 6, 2012. Retrieved March 17, 2014. 
  168. ^ a b c "Illinois – 14th District". Roll Call. Retrieved March 17, 2014. 
  169. ^ a b "Illinois 14th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 17, 2014. 
  170. ^ Fuller, James (February 2, 2010). "Hastert's son loses race to Hultgren". Daily Herald. Retrieved March 17, 2014. 
  171. ^ "Daniel J Kairis". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved March 17, 2014. 
  172. ^ Scott, Tony (October 21, 2010). "Congressional candidates debate at forum". Ledger-Sentinel. Retrieved March 18, 2014. 
  173. ^ "Write-in candidates". Daily Herald. February 2, 2010. Retrieved March 18, 2014. 
  174. ^ Saulny, Susan (January 31, 2010). "In Illinois Campaign, Republicans Squabble Amid Attempt to Regain a House Seat". The New York Times. Retrieved March 17, 2014. 
  175. ^ Blake, Aaron (December 3, 2009). "Candidate drops out, citing need to take down Hastert". The Hill. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  176. ^ Stockinger, Josh (July 2, 2009). "Geneva man eyes Foster seat.". Daily Herald. Retrieved March 18, 2014. 
  177. ^ Sarkauskas, Susan (August 26, 2009). "Elgin man running for 14th Congressional spot". Daily Herald. Retrieved March 18, 2014. 
  178. ^ Fuller, James (December 9, 2009). "Republican Vargas drops out of 14th Congressional District race". Daily Herald. Retrieved March 18, 2014. 
  179. ^ "Republican Withdraws From Ill. House Race". National Journal. October 22, 2009. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  180. ^ "Illinois District 14 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 18, 2014. 
  181. ^ "Ethan Hastert (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 18, 2014. 
  182. ^ "James (Jim) Purcell (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 18, 2014. 
  183. ^ "Jeff Danklefsen (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 18, 2014. 
  184. ^ "Mark Vargas (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 18, 2014. 
  185. ^ "IL14: Hultgren Even With Foster in Own Poll". The Rothenberg Political Report. May 5, 2010. Retrieved March 18, 2014. 
  186. ^ Miller, Tricia (October 6, 2010). "Hultgren Poll Shows Him Leading Foster in Illinois". Roll Call. Retrieved March 18, 2014. 
  187. ^ "More District by District Polls Show Democrats Well-Positioned for November". Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. October 11, 2010. Retrieved March 18, 2014. 
  188. ^ a b "District by district – Illinois". The Hill. October 19, 2010. Archived from the original on October 24, 2010. Retrieved March 18, 2014. 
  189. ^ "Illinois 14th District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved March 18, 2014. 
  190. ^ Chinwah, Larissa (November 7, 2014). "U.S. Rep. Hultgren wins in 14th". Daily Herald. Retrieved March 18, 2014. 
  191. ^ a b c "Illinois – 15th District". Roll Call. Retrieved March 18, 2014. 
  192. ^ a b "Illinois 15th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 18, 2014. 
  193. ^ Kaccich, Tom (November 1, 2010). "Third Gill-Johnson race has old, new issues". The News-Gazette. Retrieved March 18, 2014. 
  194. ^ "Illinois District 15 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  195. ^ "Illinois 15th District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  196. ^ Toeplitz, Shira (April 4, 2012). "Illinois’ Timothy Johnson to Retire". Roll Call. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  197. ^ "Democrat David Gill concedes 13th District congressional race to Republican Rodney Davis". Daily Illini. November 9, 2012. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  198. ^ a b c "Illinois – 16th District". Roll Call. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  199. ^ a b "Illinois 16th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  200. ^ "Q&A with Manzullo and Gaulrapp, 16th Congressional District". Daily Herald. October 27, 2010. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  201. ^ "Illinois District 16 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 21, 2014. 
  202. ^ "Illinois 16th District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved March 21, 2014. 
  203. ^ Isenstadt, Alex; Catanese, David (March 21, 2012). "Adam Kinzinger topples Don Manzullo in Illinois". Politico. Retrieved March 21, 2014. 
  204. ^ a b c "Illinois – 17th District". Roll Call. Retrieved March 21, 2014. 
  205. ^ a b "Illinois 17th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 21, 2014. 
  206. ^ Lowe, Kenneth (March 11, 2010). "Republican newcomer Bobby Schilling challening Democrat Phil Hare for Congress". Herald & Review. Retrieved March 21, 2014. 
  207. ^ Sood, Kiran (March 31, 2010). "Quincy man has eye on Hare's seat". SaukValley.com. Retrieved March 21, 2014. 
  208. ^ "Illinois District 17 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 21, 2014. 
  209. ^ Geraghty, Jim (July 20, 2010). "GOP's Schilling Leads Democrat Incumbent Phil Hare, 45-32". National Review. Retrieved March 21, 2014. 
  210. ^ Geraghty, Jim (August 3, 2010). "Bobby Schilling Within 2 of Phil Hare in Illinois 17th District". National Review. Retrieved March 21, 2014. 
  211. ^ "By request: Illinois CD 17". We Ask America. September 8, 2010. Retrieved March 21, 2014. 
  212. ^ Jacobs, Jeremy P. (September 29, 2010). "Starting Lineup: Midwest Trouble For House Dems". National Journal. Archived from the original on October 3, 2010. Retrieved March 21, 2014. 
  213. ^ Geraghty, Jim (October 6, 2010). "Goodbye, Phil Hare: GOP's Bobby Schilling Raises $375K in a Quarter". National Review. Retrieved March 22, 2014. 
  214. ^ Cillizza, Chris (October 19, 2010). "Democratic outside group launches Washington, West Virginia ads". The Washington Post. Retrieved March 22, 2014. 
  215. ^ "Illinois 17th District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved March 22, 2014. 
  216. ^ "Election 2012: Cheri Bustos tops Bobby Schilling in 17th District". Rockford Register Star. November 7, 2012. Retrieved March 22, 2014. 
  217. ^ a b c "Illinois – 18th District". Roll Call. Retrieved March 22, 2014. 
  218. ^ a b "Illinois 18th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 22, 2014. 
  219. ^ a b McDonald, Karen (February 3, 2010). "Hirner bests Ray in 18th Congressional District race". Journal Star. Retrieved March 22, 2014. 
  220. ^ "Illinois District 18 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 22, 2014. 
  221. ^ "Carl Douglas Ray (D)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 22, 2014. 
  222. ^ "Illinois 18th District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved March 22, 2014. 
  223. ^ Husar, Edward (November 6, 2012). "Schock captures 74 percent of vote, eager to begin third term in Congress". Quincy Herald-Whig. Retrieved March 22, 2014. 
  224. ^ a b c "Illinois – 19th district". Roll Call. Retrieved March 22, 2014. 
  225. ^ "Illinois 19th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 22, 2014. 
  226. ^ Lowe, Kenneth (October 22, 2010). "Shimkus, Bagwell split distinctly on issues in race for 19th Congressional District seat". Herald & Review. Retrieved March 22, 2014. 
  227. ^ Schoenburg, Bernard (January 29, 2010). "Veterinarian challenging Shimkus for Congress". The State Journal-Register. Retrieved March 22, 2014. 
  228. ^ Ryden, Kevin (February 1, 2010). "Olney resident makes another run for Congress, runs unopposed in primary". Olney Daily Mail. Retrieved March 22, 2014. 
  229. ^ "Illinois District 19 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 22, 2014. 
  230. ^ "Michael Firsching (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved March 23, 2014. 
  231. ^ "Illinois 19th District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved March 23, 2014. 
  232. ^ "Rep. John Shimkus wins 15th District Congressional race for U.S. House". Fox 5. November 6, 2012. Retrieved March 23, 2014. 







Creative Commons License