United States House of Representatives elections in Kentucky, 2010

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The 2010 congressional elections in Kentucky were held on November 2, 2010, and determined who would represent the Commonwealth of Kentucky in the United States House of Representatives. Kentucky has six seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; the elected served in the 112th Congress from January 3, 2011 until January 3, 2013.

Overview

United States House of Representatives elections in Kentucky, 20101
Party Votes Percentage Seats +/–
Republican 844,369 62.35% 4
Democratic 506,319 37.39% 2
Libertarian 2,029 0.15% 0
Independents 1,581 0.12% 0
Totals 1,354,298 100.00% 6

District 1

United States House of Representatives, Kentucky District 1 map.png

Running for his ninth term in this conservative2 district based in western Kentucky, incumbent Republican Congressman Ed Whitfield faced a trivial challenge from Democratic candidate Charles Hatchett. As expected, Congressman Whitfield was overwhelmingly re-elected to another term in Congress.

Results results

Kentucky's 1st congressional district election, 20101
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ed Whitfield (inc.) 153,840 71.25%
Democratic Charles Kendall Hatchett 62,090 28.75%
Totals 215,930 100.00%
Republican hold

District 2

United States House of Representatives, Kentucky District 2 map.png

Though incumbent Republican Congressman Brett Guthrie was elected by a slim margin in 2008, he did not face a serious challenge in his bid for a second term from Democratic candidate Ed Marksberry. As was expected, Congressman Guthrie was re-elected in a landslide in this conservative2 district based in west-central Kentucky.

Results

Kentucky's 2nd congressional district election, 20101
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Brett Guthrie (inc.) 155,906 67.89%
Democratic Ed Marksberry 73,749 32.11%
Totals 229,655 100.00%
Republican hold

District 3

United States House of Representatives, Kentucky District 3 map.png

Campaign

Two-term Democratic incumbent Congressman John Yarmuth has represented this liberal-leaning2 district based in metro Louisville since he was first elected in 2006. Yarmuth defeated Republican Congresswoman Anne Northup in 2006, and defeated her again in a rematch in 2008, but she declined to run again in 2010. Instead, Congressman Yarmuth faced Republican candidate Todd Lally, an airline pilot and a failed State House candidate.

Lally attacked Yarmuth for being a "liberal follower" of Nancy Pelosi who voted with her "San Francisco agenda 99 percent of the time," charges that Yarmuth called "ignorant and irresponsible."3 The Courier-Journal, the largest newspaper in the district, strongly endorsed Congressman Yarmuth in his bid for re-election,4 and in the end, Yarmuth was able to best Lally by a surprisingly wide margin.

Polling

Poll Source Dates Administered John Yarmuth (D) Tood Lally (R) Undecided
SurveyUSA October 21–25, 2010 50% 46% 1%
Rivercity Polling October 19–23, 2010 41% 37% -
Braun Research October 18–19, 2010 57.9% 31.4% 2.6%
Braun Research September 20–21, 2010 53% 30% 12%
Survey USA August 27–30, 2010 47% 45% 5%
Braun Research August 9–10, 2010 52% 29% 17%
Rivercity Polling June 20–29, 2010 44% 43% -
Cooper & Secrest Associates June 21–23, 2010 58% 32% -

Results

Kentucky's 3rd congressional district election, 20101
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Yarmuth (inc.) 139,940 54.68%
Republican Todd Lally 112,627 44.01%
Libertarian Edward A. Martin 2,029 0.79%
Independent Michael D. Hansen 1,334 0.52%
Totals 255,930 100.00%
Democratic hold

District 4

United States House of Representatives, Kentucky District 4 map.png

Campaign

This conservative2 district based in northern Kentucky, including some of metropolitan Cincinnati, has been represented by Republican Congressman Geoff Davis since he was first elected in 2004. Seeking a fourth term, Congressman Davis faced Democratic candidate John Waltz, an Iraq War veteran in the general election, who was not given much of a chance given the conservative nature of the district. As expected, Davis was overwhelmingly re-elected.

Results

Kentucky's 4th congressional district election, 20101
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Geoff Davis (inc.) 151,813 69.48%
Democratic John Waltz 66,694 30.52%
Totals 218,507 100.00%
Republican hold

District 5

United States House of Representatives, Kentucky District 5 map.png

Campaign

Republican Congressman Hal Rogers, the dean of the Kentucky congressional delegation, has represented this conservative2 district based in eastern Kentucky, faced Democratic candidate Jim Holbert in his bid for a sixteenth term. Holbert had previously run against Congressman Rogers in 2008 as an independent candidate and generated a lot of buzz from the online liberal community as a "progressive Democrat" running in a conservative district.5 However, Holbert was defeated by Rogers in a landslide for the second time in the general election.

Results

Kentucky's 5th congressional district election, 20101
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Hal Rogers (inc.) 151,019 77.42%
Democratic Jim Holbert 44,034 22.58%
Totals 195,053 100.00%
Republican hold

District 6

United States House of Representatives, Kentucky District 6 map.png

Campaign

This conservative2 district based around the Lexington metropolitan area has been represented by incumbent Democratic Congressman Ben Chandler since he was first elected in a 2004 special election. This year, Chandler faced a serious threat to bid for a fifth term in Congress from Republican attorney Andy Barr.

In the general election, both candidates started releasing television ads in August 2010, with Barr attacking Chandler for being part of "politics as usual" while Chandler countered by proclaiming his independence, saying, "If the Republican Party is going to suggest that I'm a tool of somebody else, there is no basis in fact for that."6 As election day grew nearer, both sides ramped up attacks, with the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee releasing an ads slamming Barr for his criminal record and plans to privatize Social Security.7 Barr, meanwhile, attacked Chandler for supporting gun control, even though Chandler was endorsed in his bid for re-election by the National Rifle Association.8 Polls predicted a tight race, and on election night, those polls were vindicated; no media organization called the race that night because Chandler led Barr by only a few hundred votes.9 It was only a few days later that Chandler was proclaimed the winner.

Polling

Poll Source Dates Administered Ben Chandler (D) Andy Barr (R) Undecided
Braun Research October 20–21, 2010 46.6% 42.3% 11%
Mason-Dixon October 15–19, 2010 48% 44% 8%
Tarrance Group October 4–5, 2010 47% 48% -
Mellman Group September 29–30, 2010 52% 40% -
Braun Research September 21–22, 2010 50.7% 36.5% 12.5%
Tarrance Group September 20–21, 2010 49% 42% 9%
Mellman Group September 13–14, 2010 53% 33% 14%
Grove Insight September 7–9, 2010 52% 38% -
Braun Research July 26–27, 2010 46.1% 32.2% 21%
Tarrance Group May 24–25, 2010 45% 38% 17%

Results

Kentucky's 6th congressional district election, 20101
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ben Chandler (inc.) 119,812 50.08%
Republican Andy Barr 119,164 49.81%
Write-ins 247 0.10%
Totals 239,223 100.00%
Democratic hold

References

External links


Preceded by
2008 elections
United States House elections in Kentucky
2010
Succeeded by
2012 elections







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