United States Senate elections, 2010

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United States Senate elections, 2010
United States
2008 ←
November 2, 2010
→ 2012

34 of the 100 seats of the U.S. Senate, plus 3 two mid-term vacancies
51 seats needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party
  Harry Reid official portrait 2009.jpg Sen Mitch McConnell official.jpg
Leader Harry Reid Mitch McConnell
Party Democratic Republican
Leader's seat Nevada Kentucky
Seats before 57 41
Seats after 51 47
Seat change Decrease 6 Increase 6
Popular vote 29,110,7331 32,680,704
Percentage 44.0% 49.4%
Swing Decrease 7.9% Increase 4.9%

  Third party
 
Party Independent
Seats before 2*
Seats after 2*
Seat change Steady

2010 Senate election results map.svg

  Democratic hold
  Republican gain
  Republican hold

* 2 independents (VT, CT) caucus with the Democrats.


Majority Leader before election

Harry Reid
Democratic

Elected Majority Leader

Harry Reid
Democratic

Elections to the United States Senate were held on November 2, 2010, for 37 of the United States Senate's 100 seats. (A special election on January 19, 2010 in Massachusetts was held earlier in the year.) Thirty-four of the elections were for six-year terms to the Senate's "class three", while the other three elections were special elections for shorter terms. Of the 37 elections, 19 featured incumbent Democrats (7 of whom retired or were defeated in the primary) and 18 featured incumbent Republicans (eight of whom retired or were defeated in the primary).

After the previous elections (in 2008), the Senate was composed of 58 Democrats, 40 Republicans, and 2 independents who caucused with the Democrats.

Republicans won four seats held by retiring Democrats and Republicans defeated two incumbent Democrats, for a total gain of six seats. This was the largest number of Republicans gains since the 1994 elections and also the first time since that election that Republicans successfully defended all of their own seats. This was the fourth consecutive election of "class 3" senators where Democrats failed to gain seats and the third consecutive mid-term election held in a president's first term where Republicans picked up seats.

Despite Republican gains, the Democrats retained a majority of the Senate with 51 seats plus 2 independents who caucused with them, compared to a total of 47 Republican-held seats.

Overview

Retiring senators

Twelve incumbents chose not to run for re-election.

Democrats (6) Republicans (6)

Incumbents seeking re-election

Twenty-five incumbents sought re-election.

Democrats (13) Republicans (12)

Results summary

Shading indicates party with largest share of that line.

Parties Total
Democratic Republican Independent Libertarian Green Constitution Others
Last election (2008) 57 41 2ID 100
Before this election 57 41 2ID 100
Not Up Total 38 23 2ID 63
Class 1 (2006→2012) 22 9 2ID 33
Class 2 (2008→2014) 19A 15 34
Up Total 19 18 37
Class 1 Appointees 2 2
Class 2 Appointees 1 1
Class 3 Appointees 2 2
Class 3 16 18 34
Incumbent
retired
Total 6 6 12
Held by same party 3 6 9
Replaced by other party Decrease 3 Democrats replaced by Increase 3 Republicans IncreaseDecrease 6
Result 3 9 12
Incumbent
ran
Total 13A 12 25
Renominated and won re-election 8A 10 20
Renominated but lost re-election Decrease 2 Democrats replaced by Increase 2 Republicans IncreaseDecrease 2
Lost renomination but won re-election 1 1
Lost renomination but party held 1 1
Lost renomination and party lost Decrease 1 Democrat replaced by Increase 1 Republican IncreaseDecrease 1
Result 10A 15 25
Total held 13A 18 31
Net gain/loss Decrease 6 Increase 6 IncreaseDecrease 6
Total elected 13A 24 37
Nation-wide vote Votes 29,110,733 32,680,704 147,645 755,812 516,517 172,435 2,807,291 66,191,137
Share 43.98% 49.37% 0.22% 1.14% 0.78% 0.26% 4.24% 100%
Result 51 47 2ID 100
End of this Congress 56 42 2ID 100

A Includes two incumbent appointees who won elections to finish their term or to the next full term.

ID The two Independents joined with the Democrats in their caucus.

Source: The Green Papers 2010 U.S. Senate Popular Vote and FEC Total Receipts by Party

Change in composition

Before the elections

I1 I2 D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8
D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11 D10 D9
D19 D20 D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28
D38 D37 D36 D35 D34 D33 D32 D31 D30 D29
D39 D40 D41 D42 D43 D44 D45 D46 D47 D48
Majority→ D49
R41 D57 D56 D55 D54 D53 D52 D51 D50
R40 R39 R38 R37 R36 R35 R34 R33 R32 R31
R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26 R27 R28 R29 R30
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10

After the elections and before the beginning of the 112th Congress

I1 I2 D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8
D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11 D10 D9
D19 D20 D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28
D38 D37 D36 D35 D34 D33 D32 D31 D30 D29
D39 D40 D41 D42 D43 D44 D45 D46 D47 D48
Majority→ D49 O
R41 R42 + D56 D55 D54 D53 D52 D51 D50
R40 R39 R38 R37 R36 R35 R34 R33 R32 R31
R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26 R27 R28 R29 R30
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10
Four senators were elected in special elections to serve through the end of the 111th Congress. Two of those four simultaneously ran in general elections, held contemporaneously with their special elections, and both won so they therefore began new terms with the new class of senators at the beginning of the 112th Congress.
  • R42 + (Illinois seat):
    The Democratic appointee retired and a Republican won (+ Gain).
    The winner was seated November 29, 2010, and began a new term with the following (112th) Congress.
  • D49 O (Delaware seat):
    The Democratic appointee retired and a new Democrat won (O Hold).
    The winner was seated November 15, 2010.
    This term lasted through the end of the following (112th) Congress.
  • D48 (Colorado seat):
    The Democratic appointee ran and was elected (√ Hold).
    The incumbent was already seated, and began a new term with the following (112th) Congress.
  • D47 (New York seat):
    The Democratic appointee ran and was elected (√ Hold).
    The incumbent was already seated.
    This term lasted through the end of the following (112th) Congress.

At the beginning of the 112th Congress

I1 I2 D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8
D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11 D10 D9
D19 D20 D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28
D38 D37 D36 D35 D34 D33 D32 D31 D30 D29
D39 D40 D41 D42 D43 D44 D45 D46 D47 D48
Majority→ D49 O
R41 O R42 + R43 + R44 + R45 + R46 + R47 + D51 O D50 O
R40 O R39 O R38 O R37 O R36 O R35 O R34 R33 R32 R31
R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26 R27 R28 R29 R30
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10
Key:
D# =Democratic
R# =Republican
I# =Independent, caucused with Democrats
√ = Party hold: Incumbent re-elected
O = Party hold: New senator elected from same party
+ = Party gain: New senator elected from different party
No tag = Seat not up for election this year

Summary of contests

Separate election

Date State Incumbent Party Result Candidates
January 19,
2010
Massachusetts
(Class 1: Special2)
Paul Kirk Democratic Appointee retired
Republican gain
Scott Brown (R) 51.9%
Martha Coakley (D) 47.1%
Joseph L. Kennedy (L) 1.0%

November elections

Source: http://elections.nytimes.com/2010/results/senate

State Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history
Alabama Richard Shelby Republican 1986
1992
1998
2004
Incumbent re-elected Richard Shelby (R) 65.3%
William G. Barnes (D) 34.7%
Alaska Lisa Murkowski Republican 2002 (appointed)
2004
Incumbent lost renomination,
but re-elected as write-in candidate
Lisa Murkowski (R) (Write-in) 39.3%
Joe Miller (R) 35.3%
Scott McAdams (D) 23.3%
Arizona John McCain Republican 1986
1992
1998
2004
Incumbent re-elected John McCain (R) 59.2%
Rodney Glassman (D) 34.7%
David Nolan (L) 4.7%
Jerry Joslyn (G) 1.4%
Arkansas Blanche Lincoln Democratic 1998
2004
Incumbent lost re-election
Republican gain
John Boozman (R) 58.0%
Blanche Lincoln (D) 36.9%
Trevor Drown (I) 3.3%
John Gray (G) 1.9%
California Barbara Boxer Democratic 1992
1998
2004
Incumbent re-elected Barbara Boxer (D) 52.1%
Carly Fiorina (R) 42.5%
Gail Lightfoot (L) 1.8%
Marsha Feinland (P&F) 1.3%
Edward Noonan (AIP) 1.3%
Duane Roberts (G) 1.2%
Colorado
(Class 3: Special) and
(Class 3: General)
Michael Bennet Democratic 2009 (appointed) Incumbent elected to finish term
and elected to next full term
Michael Bennet (D) 47.7%
Ken Buck (R) 46.8%
Bob Kinsey (G) 2.2%
Maclyn Stringer (L) 1.3%
Connecticut Christopher Dodd Democratic 1980
1986
1992
1998
2004
Incumbent retired
Democratic hold
Richard Blumenthal (D) 55.1%
Linda McMahon (R) 43.3%
Warren Mosler (I) 1.0%
John Mertens (CfL) 0.6%
Delaware
(Class 2: Special)
Ted Kaufman Democratic 2009 (appointed) Incumbent retired
Democratic hold
(Winner elected to finish term)
Chris Coons (D) 56.6%
Christine O'Donnell (R) 40.0%
Glenn Miller (I) 2.7%
James Rash (L) 0.7%
Florida George LeMieux Republican 2009 (appointed) Incumbent retired
Republican hold
Marco Rubio (R) 48.9%
Charlie Crist (I) 29.7%
Kendrick Meek (D) 20.1%
Alexander Snitker (L) 0.5%
Georgia Johnny Isakson Republican 2004 Incumbent re-elected Johnny Isakson (R) 58.1%
Michael Thurmond (D) 39.2%
Chuck Donovan (L) 2.7%
Hawaii Daniel Inouye Democratic 1962
1968
1974
1980
1986
1992
1998
2004
Incumbent re-elected Daniel Inouye (D) 74.8%
Campbell Cavasso (R) 21.6%
James Brewer (G) 2.1%
Jeff Mallan (L) 0.8%
Idaho Mike Crapo Republican 1998
2004
Incumbent re-elected Mike Crapo (R) 71.1%
Tom Sullivan (D) 25.0%
Randy Bergquist (C) 3.9%
Illinois
(Class 3: Special) and
(Class 3: General)
Roland Burris
Democratic 2009 (appointed) Incumbent retired
Republican gain
(Winner elected to finish term
and elected to next full term)
Mark Kirk (R) 48.2%
Alexi Giannoulias (D) 46.3%
LeAlan Jones (G) 3.2%
Mike Labino (L) 2.4%
Indiana Evan Bayh Democratic 1998
2004
Incumbent retired
Republican gain
Dan Coats (R) 56.4%
Brad Ellsworth (D) 38.1%
Rebecca Sink-Burris (L) 5.4%
Iowa Chuck Grassley Republican 1980
1986
1992
1998
2004
Incumbent re-elected Chuck Grassley (R) 64.5%
Roxanne Conlin (D) 33.2%
John Heiderscheit (L) 2.3%
Kansas Sam Brownback Republican 1996 (special)
1998
2004
Incumbent retired
Republican hold
Jerry Moran (R) 70.3%
Lisa Johnston (D) 26.2%
Michael Dann (L) 2.1%
Joe Bellis (Reform) 1.4%
Kentucky Jim Bunning Republican 1998
2004
Incumbent retired
Republican hold
Rand Paul (R) 55.8%
Jack Conway (D) 44.2%
Louisiana David Vitter Republican 2004 Incumbent re-elected David Vitter (R) 56.6%
Charles Melancon (D) 37.7%
Randall Hayes (L) 1.1%
Michael Brown (I) 0.8%
Maryland Barbara Mikulski Democratic 1986
1992
1998
2004
Incumbent re-elected Barbara Mikulski (D) 61.8%
Eric Wargotz (R) 36.3%
Kenniss Henry (G) 1.1%
Richard Shawver (C) 0.8%
Missouri Kit Bond Republican 1986
1992
1998
2004
Incumbent retired
Republican hold
Roy Blunt (R) 54.3%
Robin Carnahan (D) 40.6%
Jonathan Dine (L) 3.0%
Jerry Beck (C) 2.1%
Nevada Harry Reid Democratic 1986
1992
1998
2004
Incumbent re-elected Harry Reid (D) 50.2%
Sharron Angle (R) 44.6%
None of These Candidates 2.2%
Scott Ashjian (Tea) 0.8%
New Hampshire Judd Gregg Republican 1992
1998
2004
Incumbent retired
Republican hold
Kelly Ayotte (R) 60.2%
Paul Hodes (D) 36.7%
Chris Booth (I) 2.0%
Ken Blevens (L) 1.0%
New York
(Class 1: Special)
Kirsten Gillibrand Democratic 2009 (appointed) Incumbent elected to finish term Kirsten Gillibrand (D) 62.0%
Joseph DioGuardi (R) 35.8%
Cecile Lawrence (G) 0.8
Joseph Huff (I) 0.5%
New York Chuck Schumer Democratic 1998
2004
Incumbent re-elected Chuck Schumer (D) 65.4%
Jay Townsend (R) 33.0%
Colia Clark (G) 1.0%
Randy Credico (L) 0.6%
North Carolina Richard Burr Republican 2004 Incumbent re-elected Richard Burr (R) 55.0%
Elaine Marshall (D) 42.9%
Mike Beitler (L) 2.1%
North Dakota Byron Dorgan Democratic-NPL 1992
1998
2004
Incumbent retired
Republican gain
John Hoeven (R) 76.2%
Tracy Potter (D) 22.2%
Keith Hanson (L) 1.6%
Ohio George Voinovich Republican 1998
2004
Incumbent retired
Republican hold
Rob Portman (R) 57.3%
Lee Fisher (D) 39.0%
Eric Deaton (C) 1.7%
Michael Pryce (I) 1.3%
Oklahoma Tom Coburn Republican 2004 Incumbent re-elected Tom Coburn (R) 70.5%
Jim Rogers (D) 26.1%
Stephen Wallace (I) 2.5%
Ronald Dwyer (I) 0.9%
Oregon Ron Wyden Democratic 1996 (special)
1998
2004
Incumbent re-elected Ron Wyden (D) 57.2%
Jim Huffman (R) 39.4%
Bruce Cronk (W.F.) 1.3%
Marc Delphine (Libertarian) 1.1%
Rick Staggenborg (Progressive) 1.0%
Pennsylvania Arlen Specter Democratic 1980
1986
1992
1998
2004
Incumbent lost renomination
Republican gain
Pat Toomey (R) 51.01%
Joe Sestak (D) 48.99%
South Carolina Jim DeMint Republican 2004 Incumbent re-elected Jim DeMint (R) 62.4%
Alvin Greene (D) 28.2%
Tom Clements (G) 9.4%
South Dakota John Thune Republican 2004 Incumbent re-elected John Thune (R) 100% (Unopposed)
Utah Bob Bennett Republican 1992
1998
2004
Incumbent lost renomination
Republican hold
Mike Lee (R) 61.6%
Sam Granato (D) 32.8%
Scott Bradley (C) 5.7%
Vermont Patrick Leahy Democratic 1974
1980
1986
1992
1998
2004
Incumbent re-elected Patrick Leahy (D) 64.4%
Len Britton (R) 30.9%
Daniel Freilich (I) 1.5%
Cris Ericson (I) 1.1%
Stephen Cain (I) 1.0%
Washington Patty Murray Democratic 1992
1998
2004
Incumbent re-elected Patty Murray (D) 52.4%
Dino Rossi (R) 47.6%
West Virginia
(Class 1: Special)
Carte Goodwin Democratic 2010 (appointed) Incumbent retired
Democratic hold
Joe Manchin (D) 53.5%
John Raese (R) 43.4%
Jesse Johnson (Mountain) 1.9%
Jeff Becker (C) 1.2%
Wisconsin Russ Feingold Democratic 1992
1998
2004
Incumbent lost re-election
Republican gain
Ron Johnson (R) 51.9%
Russ Feingold (D) 47.0%
Rob Taylor (C) 1.1%

Complete list of races

Senate composition as a result of the 2010 elections.
Vote by county (click image for more details)

Note: A special election for a 38th seat was held in Massachusetts on January 19, 2010, and is not otherwise covered in this article.

Of the seats with retiring Democrats, three seats were kept by Democrats, and three were won by Republicans.

Of the seats with Democratic incumbents running for re-election, eight Democrats were re-elected, one appointee was elected to finish her term, and one appointee was elected to the next full term. Two lost re-election. One lost renomination and his seat was subsequently won by a Republican.

Of the seats with retiring Republicans, all six were replaced by Republicans.

Of the seats with Republicans incumbents running for re-election, eleven Republicans won re-election. One Republican lost renomination, but the seat was re-elected as a write-in.

Alabama

Four-term incumbent Republican Richard Shelby, a former Democrat who had switched parties in 1994 when Republicans took control of Congress, was re-elected with 68% of the vote in 2004.3 The Democratic nominee was William Barnes, a lawyer and Vietnam veteran. Shelby won re-election with 65.2% of the vote.

Alaska

Incumbent Republican Lisa Murkowski, who was appointed in 2002 by Governor Frank Murkowski (her father), was elected to a full term in 2004 with 48.6% of the vote,4 sought re-election with fundraising aid from former Governor Sarah Palin.5 In the 2008 Senate election, Democrat Mark Begich beat incumbent Republican Ted Stevens by a narrow margin, due to an ethics scandal. However, despite fundraising for Murkowski, Palin endorsed and supported Joe Miller instead of Murkowski in the Republican primary. Miller defeated Murkowski in the close primary contest.6 Sitka Mayor Scott McAdams ran as the Democrat. Murkowski then ran a write-in campaign against both Miller and McAdams,7 remaining a Republican, not an Independent.8 Murkowski was re-elected with a plurality of approximately 40% of the votes (these results were originally contested by Miller; he dropped his suit in December 2010, however, and Murkowski's victory was certified on December 30, 2010).5

Arizona

2008 Republican presidential nominee and four-term incumbent Republican John McCain had been re-elected with 77% of the vote in 2004.9 In the Republican primary, McCain defeated two opponents: former U.S. Representative J.D. Hayworth and U.S. Navy veteran and businessman Jim Deakin. Rodney Glassman, former Vice-Mayor of Tucson took the Democratic nomination.1011 John McCain won re-election with 58.7% of the vote.

Arkansas

Two-term incumbent Democrat Blanche Lincoln had been re-elected with 56% in 2004.12 Lincoln sought re-election and received a tough primary challenge from Lieutenant Governor Bill Halter13 who raised more than $1 million in his first 48 hours.14 In the primary, Lincoln finished with less than a majority and faced a runoff with Halter. On June 8, Lincoln won the runoff by a 52% to 48% margin.15 In the GOP primary, Congressman John Boozman of Arkansas's 3rd congressional district based in northwest Arkansas won a majority to become the Republican nominee.16 Former Green Beret Trevor Drown ran as a Libertarian,17 and Mayor John Gray of Greenland ran for the Green Party.18 John Boozman won the general election with 57.9% of the vote.

California

Three-term incumbent Democrat Barbara Boxer had been re-elected with 58% in 2004.19 The last time California elected a Republican to the U.S. Senate was in 1988, when Pete Wilson won a second term. He resigned in 1991 upon being elected governor, and the state has since had both its Senate seats occupied by Democrats. Boxer won the Democratic Senate primary on June 8 with 80% and Boxer faced a tough challenge in the general election from Republican businesswoman Carly Fiorina,20 a former Hewlett-Packard CEO who defeated State Assemblyman Chuck DeVore, as well as former Congressman Tom Campbell, for the GOP nomination. Donald J. "Don" Grundmann was nominated by the American Independent Party,21 and Jerry L. Carroll ran as an independent.22 Barbara Boxer won re-election with 52.2% of the vote to Fiorina's 42.2%.

Colorado

Following the resignation of one-term U.S. Senator Ken Salazar (D) to become U.S. Secretary of the Interior,23 Governor Bill Ritter selected Michael Bennet, the former Superintendent of Denver Public Schools, to fill Salazar's seat for the remainder of his term.24 Both Democrats and Republicans had close fights in their primaries, with Bennet winning the Democratic nomination despite his opponent's receiving prominent support from Bill Clinton.25 Andrew Romanoff received the endorsement of former President Bill Clinton while Bennet has been endorsed by President Obama. Weld County District Attorney Ken Buck26 won the GOP nomination over former Lieutenant Governor Jane Norton. Michael Bennet won the general election by a plurality, with 48.1% of the vote.

Connecticut

Five-term incumbent Democrat Christopher Dodd was re-elected with 66% of the vote in 2004.27 Dodd announced, on January 6, 2010, his intention not to run for re-election.28 State Attorney General Richard Blumenthal ran as a Democrat, which was expected to improve the Democrats' chances for keeping the seat in the general election,29 until revelations emerged that he had exaggerated his military record. Former CEO of World Wrestling Entertainment Linda McMahon won the GOP primary.30 Blumenthal won the general election with 55.1% of the vote.

Delaware

Kaufman was appointed to continue Joe Biden's term. In 2008, Biden had been simultaneously re-elected and elected Vice President. Biden began his seventh term on January 3, 2009,31 and he resigned January 15, 2009. Democrat Ted Kaufman, Biden's former chief of staff, was appointed to replace Biden. A special election for the remainder of Biden's term, which expires on January 3, 2015, was held in 2010. Kaufman announced that he would not be a candidate in the special election.32 The seat will be up for election again in 2014 for a full six-year term. Biden's 2008 opponent, Republican Christine O'Donnell, won an upset primary victory on September 14, 2010 against Representative Mike Castle by 6%.33 Joe Biden's son, Beau Biden, the incumbent Delaware Attorney General who returned in 2009 from serving in Iraq with the Delaware National Guard, declined to run for the Democratic nomination,34 New Castle County Executive Chris Coons won the Democratic nomination. Libertarian Jim Rash also ran.35 The race had been leaning Republican until O'Donnell upset Castle in the Republican primary election.36 Chris Coons won the special election with 56.6% of the vote.

Florida

Republican Senator Mel Martinez resigned from this seat on September 9, 2009. Governor Charlie Crist appointed George LeMieux to finish Martinez's term.37 LeMieux did not seek election to the full term in 2010.38 Crist ran against former Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives Marco Rubio for the Republican nomination, but Crist later decided to run as an independent.3940 The initial polls taken after Crist's announcement showed him leading both Rubio and either Democratic candidate. Later polling showed Rubio taking a lead of more than 50%. Rubio beat nine other Republicans for the nomination. Democratic Congressman Kendrick Meek of Florida's 17th congressional district won the Democratic nomination beating several other Democrats including real estate executive Jeff Greene.41 Marco Rubio won the general election with a 48.9% plurality.

Georgia

One-term incumbent Republican Johnny Isakson was elected with 58% of the vote in 2004.42 Isakson won renomination unopposed.43 Labor Commissioner Mike Thurmond was the Democratic nominee. Isakson won re-election with 58.1% of the vote.

Hawaii

Eight-term incumbent Democrat Daniel Inouye had been re-elected with 76% in 200444 and announced he would seek re-election.45 Daniel Inouye won re-election with 75% of the vote.

Idaho

Two-term incumbent Republican Mike Crapo was reelected against only token write-in opposition in 2004.46 The Democratic nominee in 2010 was Tom Sullivan and the Constitution Party nominee was Randy Lynn Bergquist. Crapo won re-election with 71.1% of the vote.

Illinois

Burris was appointed to continue Barack Obama's term, and he did not seek re-election in 2010. The election featured both a special election to finish the term ending January 3, 2011, and a general election to begin that day. Candidates included Democratic State Treasurer Alexi Giannoulias, Republican congressman Mark Kirk, Green party journalist LeAlan Jones and Libertarian Michael Labno.47 Also running as a write-in candidate was Independent Conservative Robert L. "Bob" Zadek. Mark Kirk won the general election with 48.4% of the vote.

Indiana

Evan Bayh, two-term incumbent Democratic senator and former two-term Governor of Indiana, announced that he wouldn't seek re-election.48 U.S. Representative Brad Ellsworth of Indiana's 8th congressional district was the Democratic nominee.49 Lobbyist and former U.S. Senator Dan Coats was the Republican nominee.50 Running under the Libertarian Party was Rebecca Sink-Burris, a former teacher from Bloomington, Indiana. Two independents attempted to make the ballot for the general election: Don Harris51 and Timothy Frye.52 Dan Coats won the general election with 54.6% of the vote.

Iowa

Five-term incumbent Republican Chuck Grassley was re-elected with 70% in 2004. Grassley ran for re-election and was renominated. Former U.S. Attorney Roxanne Conlin53 won the Democratic nomination.54 Grassley won re-election with 64.4% of the vote.

Kansas

Two-term incumbent Republican Sam Brownback retired and ran for Governor of Kansas.55 Republican Jerry Moran of Kansas's 1st congressional district56 narrowly won the GOP primary against Congressman Todd Tiahrt of Kansas's 4th congressional district.57 Baker University Assistant Dean Lisa Johnston was the Democratic nominee and Joe Bellis58 ran as the Reform Party candidate. Jerry Moran won the general election with 70.3% of the vote.

Kentucky

Two-term incumbent Republican Jim Bunning had been narrowly re-elected (51-49%) in 2004 against his Democratic opponent, then-State Senator Daniel Mongiardo.59 Bunning had intended to run for re-election, but state Republican leaders were not supportive.60 On July 27, 2009, Bunning announced that he would retire.61 In the primary elections, Republican physician Rand Paul, son of libertarian-leaning U.S. Representative and 2008 Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul (R-Texas), defeated Kentucky Secretary of State Trey Grayson despite Grayson's support by Kentucky's Senior Senator and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell.6263 Democratic Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway was nominated in his primary over Lieutenant Governor Daniel Mongiardo. Rand Paul won the general election with 55.7% of the vote.

Louisiana

One-term incumbent Republican David Vitter was elected with 51% in 2004,64 overcoming Louisiana's jungle primary system. Vitter sought re-election in 2010,65 despite being involved in a prostitution scandal.66 Congressman Charles Melancon of Louisiana's 3rd congressional district was the Democratic nominee. Vitter won re-election with 56.6% of the vote.

Maryland

Four-term incumbent Democrat Barbara Mikulski had been re-elected with 65% in 2004.67 Mikulski faced nominal competition in her primary and was easily renominated. Eleven Republicans dueled for the nomination including Eric Wargotz, president of the Queen Anne's County Commission,.68 Wargotz won the GOP nomination, joining Richard Shawver (Constitution) and Kenniss Henry (Green). Barbara Mikulski won re-election with 62.2%.

Missouri

Four-term incumbent Republican Kit Bond was re-elected with 56% in 2004, and this time he did not seek re-election.69 Congressman Roy Blunt, the former House Majority Whip from Missouri's 7th congressional district, won the Republican nomination beating 10 other Republicans. Democratic Secretary of State Robin Carnahan beat two other candidates for her party's nomination. Midge Potts70 was the nominee of the Progressive Party of Missouri. The Constitution Party of Missouri had three candidates, and it nominated Jerry Beck.71 The Libertarian Party had two candidates, and it nominated Jonathan Dine.72 Glenn Miller sought election as a write-in candidate.73 Roy Blunt won the general election with 54.3% of the vote.

Nevada

Four-term incumbent and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid was re-elected with 61% in 2004.44 As Reid began his re-election bid,74 he was considered one of the most vulnerable incumbents in the 2010 election cycle. He faced a tough challenge in the general election from former State Assemblywoman Sharron Angle, who received much support and enthusiasm from the Tea Party and who defeated Nevada Republican Party chairperson Sue Lowden for the GOP nomination. Harry Reid won re-election, 50.3% to Angle's 44.5%.

New Hampshire

Three-term incumbent Republican Judd Gregg was re-elected in 2004 with 66%.75 Gregg did not seek re-election in 2010.76 The only Democratic candidate was Congressman Paul Hodes of New Hampshire's 2nd congressional district.77 Republican State Attorney General Kelly Ayotte won the Republican nomination narrowly beating Ovide Lamontagne78 Self-employed realtor and perennial candidate Kenneth Blevens ran as the Libertarian.79 Kelly Ayotte won the general election with 60.2% of the vote.

New York

Two-term incumbent Democrat Chuck Schumer had been re-elected with 71% in 2004.8081 Chuck Schumer won re-election with 66% of the vote.

New York

Incumbent Democrat Kirsten Gillibrand had been appointed on January 23, 2009 by the Governor, after then-Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton resigned to become U.S. Secretary of State.82 The appointment lasted until this special election, the winner of which will serve to the end of the term in January 2013.83 Gillibrand won the primary against attorney Gail Goode by a margin of three-to-one. In the Republican primary, former Congressman Joe DioGuardi 84 beat two strong challengers for the GOP nomination. Kirsten Gillibrand won the special election with 62.0%.

North Carolina

One-term incumbent Republican Richard Burr was elected with 52% in 2004.85 Burr sought re-election and won his party's nomination.86 Secretary of State Elaine Marshall secured the Democratic nomination. Michael Beitler ran as the Libertarian candidate.87 Burr won re-election with 54.8% of the vote.

North Dakota

Incumbent Democrat Byron Dorgan announced on January 5, 2010 that he would not seek re-election in 2010.8889 In 2004, he won with 68%. Independent Ralph Nader received 1.32% in North Dakota. State Senator Tracy Potter was the only Democrat to run for the nomination,90 and he won the Democratic primary election with no competition. Republican former Governor John Hoeven ran91 and won the Republican nomination at the state primary convention on March 22. Keith Hanson ran as a Libertarian.92 John Hoeven won the general election with 76.2% of the vote.

Ohio

Two-term incumbent Republican George Voinovich was re-elected with 64% in 2004. Voinovich did not seek re-election in 2010.9394 Republicans nominated Rob Portman, former Congressman, U.S. Trade Representative, and Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Director and the Democrats nominated Lieutenant Governor Lee Fisher. Eric Deaton, a field service engineer with General Electric, ran as the Constitution Party candidate and Dan La Botz was nominated by the Socialist Party of Ohio, a state-affiliate of the Socialist Party USA.95 Rob Portman won the general election with 57.3%.

Oklahoma

One-term incumbent Republican Tom Coburn was elected with 53% in 2004.96 Coburn announced that he would be running for a second and final term.97 Former Republican Party activist Stephen Wallace challenged Coburn as an independent, and the mysterious Jim Rogers won the Democratic nomination without actually campaigning. Coburn won re-election with 70.64%.

Oregon

Two-term incumbent Democrat Ron Wyden had been re-elected with 64% in 2004. Wyden easily won the Democratic primary nomination, and faced law professor Republican Jim Huffman, in the general election.98 Ron Wyden won re-election with 57.3% of the vote.

Pennsylvania

Five-term incumbent Democrat Arlen Specter had been re-elected in 2004 as a Republican by a 53% to 42% margin.99 On April 28, 2009, Specter announced that he would leave the Republican Party and seek a sixth term in 2010 as a Democrat.100 Based on polling, the 2004 primary results and a smaller, more conservative Pennsylvania Republican primary electorate, Specter judged that he would lose the Republican primary, and since Pennsylvania law would bar him from running as an independent under such circumstances, he switched parties in 2009 in anticipation of this election. He lost the Democratic primary, however, to retired U.S. Navy Rear Admiral and then-U.S. Representative Joe Sestak of Pennsylvania's 7th congressional district, despite Specter's support from the Democratic establishment.101 On the Republican side, former U.S. Representative and former President of the Club for Growth Pat Toomey, who came within 1.7% of defeating Specter in the 2004 GOP primary, easily won the GOP nomination. Pat Toomey won the general election with 51.0% of the vote.

South Carolina

Incumbent Republican Jim DeMint was elected with 54% in 2004.102 DeMint raised $2.2 million for his intended reelection bid.103 DeMint was easily renominated. He stated in July 2009 that the defeat of health care reform would be Obama's Waterloo. In a surprise, unemployed military veteran Alvin Greene won the Democratic primary. Greene reported no fundraising by mid-October and made few campaign appearances. Tom Clements ran as the candidate of the Green Party. DeMint won re-election with 61.48%.

South Dakota

One-term incumbent Republican John Thune was elected with 51% in 2004, ousting former Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle.104 Thune ran unopposed and was re-elected.

Utah

Three-term incumbent Republican Bob Bennett was re-elected with 69% in 2004.105 Bennett lost renomination, and the GOP nominated Mike Lee, who faced Utah Alcoholic Beverage Control Commission Chairman, Democrat Sam Granato, in the general election.106107 Lee won the general election with 61.6% of the vote.

Vermont

Six-term incumbent Democrat Patrick Leahy was re-elected with 71% in 2004.108 Leahy easily fended off a primary challenge and went on to the general election against Republican Len Britton. Leahy won re-election with 64.4% of the vote.

Washington

Three-term incumbent Democrat Patty Murray was re-elected with 55% in 2004.109 Republican Dino Rossi, who narrowly lost the 2004 and 2008 gubernatorial elections, ran as a Republican. Murray and Rossi advanced to the general election, taking the top two spots in the blanket primary. Patty Murray won re-election with 52.4% of the vote.

West Virginia

Senator Robert Byrd (D) died on June 28, 2010. Democratic Governor Joe Manchin appointed Carte Goodwin to serve until the special election. Goodwin announced that he would not run in the special election. Both parties held their primaries on August 28. Manchin ran110 against 95-year old former representative and former Secretary of State Ken Hechler111 and 2008 Senate candidate Sheirl Fletcher.112 Manchin won the primary nomination with over 70% of the Democratic vote. 2006 Republican nominee against Robert Byrd, John Raese ran in the GOP primary.113 State Senator Clark Barnes was another potential candidate. Representative Shelley Moore Capito announced that she would not seek the seat. Raese won the Republican nomination with over 70% of that vote. Jesse Johnson ran as the Mountain Party's nominee. Joe Manchin won the special election with 53.5% of the vote.

Wisconsin

Three-term incumbent Democrat Russ Feingold had been re-elected with 55% in 2004.114 Ron Johnson, a Fox Valley millionaire businessman and political novice, was the Republican nominee. Rob Taylor ran as the Constitution Party nominee.115 Ron Johnson won the general election with 51.9% of the vote.

See also

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